Nick Turse

Aug 19

In response to my FOIA request, the U.S. Navy reveals “China’s Grand Design” with just a few slight redactions..

In response to my FOIA request, the U.S. Navy reveals “China’s Grand Design” with just a few slight redactions..

Aug 16

[video]

[video]

Aug 13

theeconomist:

Daily chart: The disparity of attention and casualties among global conflicts

theeconomist:

Daily chart: The disparity of attention and casualties among global conflicts

wired:

Presenting our September cover: Edward Snowden, photographed by Platon. Read our exclusive profile of Snowden here.

wired:

Presenting our September cover: Edward Snowden, photographed by Platon. Read our exclusive profile of Snowden here.

[video]

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Nursing officer Jane (in red) traveled several miles for a home visit in a Central Ugandan village to check on one of her cervical cancer patients. In Jane’s experience cervical cancer screening outreaches that bring health workers into communities are favored by her patients who prefer to be screened close to their homes and with other women in their villages. “For somebody to come up to [the town center], they fear no transport,” Jane said. “They fear what will happen if found positive. But if they come in a big number they feel comforted.” Unfortunately, screening outreaches in Jane’s district are rare because there are no funds to pay for transportation. 

Image and text by Sasha Garrey, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center student fellow, Sasha Garrey is a recent graduate from Boston University. She reports that in Uganda, cervical cancer is the most fatal cancer in women.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Nursing officer Jane (in red) traveled several miles for a home visit in a Central Ugandan village to check on one of her cervical cancer patients. In Jane’s experience cervical cancer screening outreaches that bring health workers into communities are favored by her patients who prefer to be screened close to their homes and with other women in their villages. “For somebody to come up to [the town center], they fear no transport,” Jane said. “They fear what will happen if found positive. But if they come in a big number they feel comforted.” Unfortunately, screening outreaches in Jane’s district are rare because there are no funds to pay for transportation. 

Image and text by Sasha Garrey, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center student fellow, Sasha Garrey is a recent graduate from Boston University. She reports that in Uganda, cervical cancer is the most fatal cancer in women.

Where did the tears come from?

My best guess, strange as it might sound, is that our ancestors were in the habit of punching each other on the nose. Such injuries would have resulted in copious tear production. And there is an independent line of evidence to suggest that they were common. According to recent analysis by David Carrier and Michael Morgan from Utah University, the shape of human facial bones might well have evolved to withstand the physical trauma of frequent punching. Thickly buttressed facial bones are first seen in fossils of Australopithecus, which appeared following our split with chimpanzees. Carrier and Morgan further argue that Australopithecus was our first ancestor whose hand was capable of making a tight fist. So, the reason we weep now may well be that our ancestors discussed their differences by hitting each other in the face. Some of us still do, I suppose.

” — The origin of laughter, smiles and tears – Michael Graziano, professor of neuroscience at Princeton University – Aeon

“About 10 years ago I was walking down the central corridor in my lab at Princeton University when something wet smacked me from behind. I gave a most undignified squawk and ducked with my hands thrown up around my head. Turning around, I saw not one but two of my students — one with a squirt gun, the other with a video camera.” — The origin of laughter, smiles and tears – Michael Graziano – Aeon

(via Outbreaks in America — The Nib — Medium)

(via Outbreaks in America — The Nib — Medium)