Nick Turse

Oct 15

cjchivers:

The Secret Victims of Iraq’s Chemical Arms
Aged shells and warheads. Officers who ordered wounded troops to silence. Substandard medical care (and even denial of treatment) to Iraqis and Americans who were exposed. American-designed mustard shells in the corroded vestiges of Saddam Hussein’s old chemical stockpile.  Honors denied to troops who served in some of the most dangerous jobs of the most recent Iraq War.
On The New York Times: An untold chronicle of the United States’ long and bitter involvement in Iraq.

From 2004 to 2011, American and American-trained Iraqi troops repeatedly encountered, and on at least six occasions were wounded by, chemical weapons remaining from years earlier in Saddam Hussein’s rule.
In all, American troops secretly reported finding roughly 5,000 chemical warheads, shells or aviation bombs, according to interviews with dozens of participants, Iraqi and American officials, and heavily redacted intelligence documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act.

An investigation many months in works, and at last in print. Heres why:  
Reporting was contributed by John Ismay, Duraid Ahmed, Omar al-Jawoshy, Mac William Bishop and Eric Schmitt. Alain Delaquérière contributed research.
Produced by Craig Allen, David Furst, Alicia DeSantis, Sergio Peçanha, Shreeya Sinha, Frank O’Connell, Derek Watkins and Josh Williams.
With editing by Michael Slackman and Matt Purdy, and photographs by Tyler Hicks
ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPH
Leaking 155-mm mustard agent shells among those that wounded five American soldiers near Taji, Iraq in 2008

cjchivers:

The Secret Victims of Iraq’s Chemical Arms

Aged shells and warheads. Officers who ordered wounded troops to silence. Substandard medical care (and even denial of treatment) to Iraqis and Americans who were exposed. American-designed mustard shells in the corroded vestiges of Saddam Hussein’s old chemical stockpile.  Honors denied to troops who served in some of the most dangerous jobs of the most recent Iraq War.

On The New York Times: An untold chronicle of the United States’ long and bitter involvement in Iraq.

From 2004 to 2011, American and American-trained Iraqi troops repeatedly encountered, and on at least six occasions were wounded by, chemical weapons remaining from years earlier in Saddam Hussein’s rule.

In all, American troops secretly reported finding roughly 5,000 chemical warheads, shells or aviation bombs, according to interviews with dozens of participants, Iraqi and American officials, and heavily redacted intelligence documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act.

An investigation many months in works, and at last in print. Heres why:  

Reporting was contributed by John Ismay, Duraid Ahmed, Omar al-Jawoshy, Mac William Bishop and Eric Schmitt. Alain Delaquérière contributed research.

Produced by Craig Allen, David Furst, Alicia DeSantis, Sergio Peçanha, Shreeya Sinha, Frank O’Connell, Derek Watkins and Josh Williams.

With editing by Michael Slackman and Matt Purdy, and photographs by Tyler Hicks

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPH

Leaking 155-mm mustard agent shells among those that wounded five American soldiers near Taji, Iraq in 2008

Oct 06

newyorker:

The photographer Moises Saman captured the assault on Hong Kong protesters on Friday. Take a look at his powerful photos.A pro-democracy protester in Mong Kok, a working-class neighborhood in Hong Kong, on Friday. Photograph by Moises Saman/Magnum

newyorker:

The photographer Moises Saman captured the assault on Hong Kong protesters on Friday. Take a look at his powerful photos.

A pro-democracy protester in Mong Kok, a working-class neighborhood in Hong Kong, on Friday. Photograph by Moises Saman/Magnum

(Source: newyorker.com)

Oct 05

As America’s efforts to “degrade and ultimately destroy” Islamic State militants extend into Syria, Iraq War III has seamlessly morphed into Greater Middle East Battlefield XIV. That is, Syria has become at least the 14th country in the Islamic world that U.S. forces have invaded or occupied or bombed, and in which American soldiers have killed or been killed. And that’s just since 1980.

Let’s tick them off: Iran (1980, 1987-1988), Libya (1981, 1986, 1989, 2011), Lebanon (1983), Kuwait (1991), Iraq (1991-2011, 2014-), Somalia (1992-1993, 2007-), Bosnia (1995), Saudi Arabia (1991, 1996), Afghanistan (1998, 2001-), Sudan (1998), Kosovo (1999), Yemen (2000, 2002-), Pakistan (2004-) and now Syria. Whew.

With our 14th front barely opened, the Pentagon foresees a campaign likely to last for years. Yet even at this early date, this much already seems clear: Even if we win, we lose.

” — Andrew J. Bacevich,Even if we defeat the Islamic State, we’ll still lose the bigger war - The Washington Post

Aug 19

In response to my FOIA request, the U.S. Navy reveals “China’s Grand Design” with just a few slight redactions..

In response to my FOIA request, the U.S. Navy reveals “China’s Grand Design” with just a few slight redactions..

Aug 16

[video]

[video]

Aug 13

theeconomist:

Daily chart: The disparity of attention and casualties among global conflicts

theeconomist:

Daily chart: The disparity of attention and casualties among global conflicts

wired:

Presenting our September cover: Edward Snowden, photographed by Platon. Read our exclusive profile of Snowden here.

wired:

Presenting our September cover: Edward Snowden, photographed by Platon. Read our exclusive profile of Snowden here.

[video]

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Nursing officer Jane (in red) traveled several miles for a home visit in a Central Ugandan village to check on one of her cervical cancer patients. In Jane’s experience cervical cancer screening outreaches that bring health workers into communities are favored by her patients who prefer to be screened close to their homes and with other women in their villages. “For somebody to come up to [the town center], they fear no transport,” Jane said. “They fear what will happen if found positive. But if they come in a big number they feel comforted.” Unfortunately, screening outreaches in Jane’s district are rare because there are no funds to pay for transportation. 

Image and text by Sasha Garrey, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 
Pulitzer Center student fellow, Sasha Garrey is a recent graduate from Boston University. She reports that in Uganda, cervical cancer is the most fatal cancer in women.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Nursing officer Jane (in red) traveled several miles for a home visit in a Central Ugandan village to check on one of her cervical cancer patients. In Jane’s experience cervical cancer screening outreaches that bring health workers into communities are favored by her patients who prefer to be screened close to their homes and with other women in their villages. “For somebody to come up to [the town center], they fear no transport,” Jane said. “They fear what will happen if found positive. But if they come in a big number they feel comforted.” Unfortunately, screening outreaches in Jane’s district are rare because there are no funds to pay for transportation. 

Image and text by Sasha Garrey, via Instagram. Uganda, 2014. 

Pulitzer Center student fellow, Sasha Garrey is a recent graduate from Boston University. She reports that in Uganda, cervical cancer is the most fatal cancer in women.