Nick Turse

Apr 15

Bowery bootblack. New York City.: 06/1910 (NARA)

Bowery bootblack. New York City.: 06/1910 (NARA)

(Source: nickturse)

tamturse:

Art v Math #graffiti

tamturse:

Art v Math #graffiti

(via nickturse)

Drones are “traumatizing an entire generation” in Yemen. Don’t miss Vivian Salama’s powerful piece: “Drones in Yemen: How U.S. Attacks Are Devastating a Nation” in Rolling Stone

Drones are “traumatizing an entire generation” in Yemen. Don’t miss Vivian Salama’s powerful piece: “Drones in Yemen: How U.S. Attacks Are Devastating a Nation” in Rolling Stone

Apr 14

Valentine, Texas,
2013

Valentine, Texas,

2013

An olde mail chute in NYC’s Flatiron Building, home of my publisher: Henry Holt. If you want to know more about the Cutler Manufacturing Company and their high quality mail chutes, take a gander at this 1909 article from The New York Times.

An olde mail chute in NYC’s Flatiron Building, home of my publisher: Henry Holt. If you want to know more about the Cutler Manufacturing Company and their high quality mail chutes, take a gander at this 1909 article from The New York Times.

(Source: nickturse)

A compound in Mali, an airfield in Niger, a string of air bases across the north of the continent and more than two years of “war” in Africa. Read my latest article to know what U.S. officials say behind closed doors about the future of U.S. ops in Africa.

A compound in Mali, an airfield in Niger, a string of air bases across the north of the continent and more than two years of “war” in Africa. Read my latest article to know what U.S. officials say behind closed doors about the future of U.S. ops in Africa.

Apr 13

On the same day that I nabbed Tom Wolfe’s The Pump House Gang from The Strand’s 48 cent “bargain bin,” I picked up the above volume: Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers.  (I guess somebody decided to sell off their whole collection of old Wolfe paperbacks, because there were a few other TW volumes that I didn’t pick up that day.)

It had been many years since I first read “Radical Chic,” Wolfe’s classic “New Journalism” account of the January 4, 1970 party that Maestro and Mrs. Leonard Bernstein threw to raise money for the Black Panthers Defense Fund. 
It had been so many years, in fact, that I realized that in the intervening decade-plus since I first encountered the book, I had met at least two of the people who attended the January 4, 1970 party.  Stranger still, I came to this realization while reading the volume on the subway, en route to the home of one of those people.  Crazy, right?  Maybe I’ll ask her about it one day.
If you’re interested in reading Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers and you can’t find an old edition with one, two, many Tom Wolfes populating the cover, don’t worry.  It’s still in print from Macmillan.  (Full disclosure, they’re my publisher, too.) 

On the same day that I nabbed Tom Wolfe’s The Pump House Gang from The Strand’s 48 cent “bargain bin,” I picked up the above volume: Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers.  (I guess somebody decided to sell off their whole collection of old Wolfe paperbacks, because there were a few other TW volumes that I didn’t pick up that day.)

It had been many years since I first read “Radical Chic,” Wolfe’s classic “New Journalism” account of the January 4, 1970 party that Maestro and Mrs. Leonard Bernstein threw to raise money for the Black Panthers Defense Fund. 

It had been so many years, in fact, that I realized that in the intervening decade-plus since I first encountered the book, I had met at least two of the people who attended the January 4, 1970 party.  Stranger still, I came to this realization while reading the volume on the subway, en route to the home of one of those people.  Crazy, right?  Maybe I’ll ask her about it one day.

If you’re interested in reading Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers and you can’t find an old edition with one, two, many Tom Wolfes populating the cover, don’t worry.  It’s still in print from Macmillan.  (Full disclosure, they’re my publisher, too.) 

(via nickturse)

Did you know the U.S. military had a secret compound in the African nation of Mali? 
Read the full story here.

Did you know the U.S. military had a secret compound in the African nation of Mali? 

Read the full story here.

Several years ago, while reporting from Vietnam, I headed into the equivalent of a live minefield — a future construction site littered with unexploded ordnance left from what the Vietnamese call the “American War.”  I went there to cover the work of a demining team from Project Renew: a 16-member Vietnamese unit, overseen by Australian explosive ordnance disposal supervisor.
That day, the team disposed of an M-79 round — a 40 mm high-explosive projectile fired from a breach-loading, single-shot U.S. grenade launcher — making the country a little safer.  Having seen kids permanently scarred by old ordnance and having interviewed grieving parents who lost children to old American bombs, it was gratifying to witness the folks from Project Renew in action.
I see that Project Renew, which calls itself  a “humanitarian mine action organization dedicated to cleaning up explosive remnants of war,” now has a Tumblr.  Please consider following them.  They do great work at great risk to shield future generations from the horrors of the past.

Several years ago, while reporting from Vietnam, I headed into the equivalent of a live minefield — a future construction site littered with unexploded ordnance left from what the Vietnamese call the “American War.”  I went there to cover the work of a demining team from Project Renew: a 16-member Vietnamese unit, overseen by Australian explosive ordnance disposal supervisor.

That day, the team disposed of an M-79 round — a 40 mm high-explosive projectile fired from a breach-loading, single-shot U.S. grenade launcher — making the country a little safer.  Having seen kids permanently scarred by old ordnance and having interviewed grieving parents who lost children to old American bombs, it was gratifying to witness the folks from Project Renew in action.

I see that Project Renew, which calls itself  a “humanitarian mine action organization dedicated to cleaning up explosive remnants of war,” now has a Tumblr.  Please consider following them.  They do great work at great risk to shield future generations from the horrors of the past.

(via nickturse)

1 in 3 Deaths in America Result from High Inequality -

bostonreview:

There is growing evidence that the factor most responsible for the relatively poor health in the United States is the vast and rising inequality in wealth and income that we not only tolerate, but resist changing.

(via tomdispatch)