Nick Turse
Several years ago, while reporting from Vietnam, I headed into the equivalent of a live minefield — a future construction site littered with unexploded ordnance left from what the Vietnamese call the “American War.”  I went there to cover the work of a demining team from Project Renew: a 16-member Vietnamese unit, overseen by Australian explosive ordnance disposal supervisor.
That day, the team disposed of an M-79 round — a 40 mm high-explosive projectile fired from a breach-loading, single-shot U.S. grenade launcher — making the country a little safer.  Having seen kids permanently scarred by old ordnance and having interviewed grieving parents who lost children to old American bombs, it was gratifying to witness the folks from Project Renew in action.
I see that Project Renew, which calls itself  a “humanitarian mine action organization dedicated to cleaning up explosive remnants of war,” now has a Tumblr.  Please consider following them.  They do great work at great risk to shield future generations from the horrors of the past.

Several years ago, while reporting from Vietnam, I headed into the equivalent of a live minefield — a future construction site littered with unexploded ordnance left from what the Vietnamese call the “American War.”  I went there to cover the work of a demining team from Project Renew: a 16-member Vietnamese unit, overseen by Australian explosive ordnance disposal supervisor.

That day, the team disposed of an M-79 round — a 40 mm high-explosive projectile fired from a breach-loading, single-shot U.S. grenade launcher — making the country a little safer.  Having seen kids permanently scarred by old ordnance and having interviewed grieving parents who lost children to old American bombs, it was gratifying to witness the folks from Project Renew in action.

I see that Project Renew, which calls itself  a “humanitarian mine action organization dedicated to cleaning up explosive remnants of war,” now has a Tumblr.  Please consider following them.  They do great work at great risk to shield future generations from the horrors of the past.

bostonreview:

There is growing evidence that the factor most responsible for the relatively poor health in the United States is the vast and rising inequality in wealth and income that we not only tolerate, but resist changing.

\For my second installment of finds from the 48-cent “bargain bin” of NYC’s Strand Book Store, I offer this fantastic Orwell volume.
When he’s at his best, it’s damn hard to find a better writer than the word-artist formerly known as Eric Arthur Blair.  Clear, concise, powerful sentences elegantly woven together — that’s Orwell.  As a writer, it’s always humbling to read him.  But this collection also has unpublished material, like private letters to friends.  And guess what?  The prose is downright pedestrian.  It almost makes you feel better, until you realize that Orwell must have agonized over word choice, sentence construction and edited himself like mad.  So if your sentences are clunkier and are filled with extraneous words and over-worn phrases, it means you must just be lazier than ol’ George was.  Sigh.    
Published by Penguin in 1970, this volume was — due to copyright restrictions — not available for sale in the U.S.  (It retailed for $2.15 in Canada and $1.70 in New Zealand.)  While you may not be able to find this particular edition much anymore, you can find plenty of Orwell selections at The Strand and elsewhere.
If you find yourself in the mood, check out The Strand’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above.  For more on Orwell, check out this page from the BBC.

\For my second installment of finds from the 48-cent “bargain bin” of NYC’s Strand Book Store, I offer this fantastic Orwell volume.

When he’s at his best, it’s damn hard to find a better writer than the word-artist formerly known as Eric Arthur Blair.  Clear, concise, powerful sentences elegantly woven together — that’s Orwell.  As a writer, it’s always humbling to read him.  But this collection also has unpublished material, like private letters to friends.  And guess what?  The prose is downright pedestrian.  It almost makes you feel better, until you realize that Orwell must have agonized over word choice, sentence construction and edited himself like mad.  So if your sentences are clunkier and are filled with extraneous words and over-worn phrases, it means you must just be lazier than ol’ George was.  Sigh.    

Published by Penguin in 1970, this volume was — due to copyright restrictions — not available for sale in the U.S.  (It retailed for $2.15 in Canada and $1.70 in New Zealand.)  While you may not be able to find this particular edition much anymore, you can find plenty of Orwell selections at The Strand and elsewhere.

If you find yourself in the mood, check out The Strand’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above.  For more on Orwell, check out this page from the BBC.

SUBWAY CAR: 08/1973 (NARA)
nickturse:

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. [Entertainment: closeup view of vocalists Joan Baez and Bob Dylan.]: 08/28/1963 (NARA)
Fort Davis, Texas
2013

Fort Davis, Texas

2013

guardian:

Dhaka, Bangladesh: A child dressed as Krishna takes part in Janmashtami celebrations  Photograph: Pavel Rahman/AP

guardian:

Dhaka, Bangladesh: A child dressed as Krishna takes part in Janmashtami celebrations  Photograph: Pavel Rahman/AP

NEW YORK CITY CANYON—TALL BUILDINGS JUT INTO THE AIR; YELLOW CABS AND OTHER VEHICLES CRAWL THROUGH THE CONGESTED STREETS BELOW: 05/1973 (NARA)

NEW YORK CITY CANYON—TALL BUILDINGS JUT INTO THE AIR; YELLOW CABS AND OTHER VEHICLES CRAWL THROUGH THE CONGESTED STREETS BELOW: 05/1973 (NARA)

thepoliticalnotebook:

“I am a war photographer, and I need to start working again." 
Spanish photojournalist Ricardo Garcia Vilanova was recently released from captivity in Syria, along with journalist Javier Espinosa. The pair were imprisoned for six months and were released just last weekend. 
Garcia Vilanova, however, is a freelancer — sent to Syria on spec. He is out seven months of work and all his equipment.
"I am spending time relaxing with my parents and my family,and then I need to find work," he says. "I need to find assignments. Six months without working, that’s not good."
Please consider donating!

thepoliticalnotebook:

I am a war photographer, and I need to start working again.

Spanish photojournalist Ricardo Garcia Vilanova was recently released from captivity in Syria, along with journalist Javier Espinosa. The pair were imprisoned for six months and were released just last weekend. 

Garcia Vilanova, however, is a freelancer — sent to Syria on spec. He is out seven months of work and all his equipment.

"I am spending time relaxing with my parents and my family,and then I need to find work," he says. "I need to find assignments. Six months without working, that’s not good."

Please consider donating!

nickturse:

Like a million other people, the Strand is one of my favorite bookstores in the whole wide world.  The sole survivor of close to 50 book shops on what used to be known as Manhattan’s “Book Row,” it’s one of NYC’s true gems.  If you’re in town, you simply must go. 
While the 18 miles of new, used and rare books within The Strand’s walls are endlessly fascinating, I’m an even bigger fan of the “bargain bin” books outside.  On any given day, you can find a plethora of worthy texts in need of rescue on the $1 and $2 carts that line the sidewalk on East 12th Street.  The pièce de résistance, however, is the collection of 48 cent paperbacks. This one little cart has it all: hideous old novellas by no-name authors, best-sellers from a decade ago, vintage mass market masterpieces — you name it.  There’s no telling what you’ll find and it’s always — ALWAYS — worth a peek.  I’ve decided to share my 48-cent-finds from time to time on Tumblr.  Here’s one that I nabbed a few weeks back, a 1969 edition of Tom Wolfe’s The Pump House Gang — a collection of his essays on 1960s subcultures.  Dig that cover.  For good or for ill, they don’t design them like that anymore.
It looks as though The Pump House Gang may be out of print, but you can always try to search out a copy at The Strand or your local used book store. 
If you find yourself in the mood, check out Strand Book Store’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above. 

nickturse:

Like a million other people, the Strand is one of my favorite bookstores in the whole wide world.  The sole survivor of close to 50 book shops on what used to be known as Manhattan’s “Book Row,” it’s one of NYC’s true gems.  If you’re in town, you simply must go. 

While the 18 miles of new, used and rare books within The Strand’s walls are endlessly fascinating, I’m an even bigger fan of the “bargain bin” books outside.  On any given day, you can find a plethora of worthy texts in need of rescue on the $1 and $2 carts that line the sidewalk on East 12th Street.  The pièce de résistance, however, is the collection of 48 cent paperbacks. This one little cart has it all: hideous old novellas by no-name authors, best-sellers from a decade ago, vintage mass market masterpieces — you name it.  There’s no telling what you’ll find and it’s always — ALWAYS — worth a peek.  I’ve decided to share my 48-cent-finds from time to time on Tumblr.  Here’s one that I nabbed a few weeks back, a 1969 edition of Tom Wolfe’s The Pump House Ganga collection of his essays on 1960s subcultures.  Dig that cover.  For good or for ill, they don’t design them like that anymore.

It looks as though The Pump House Gang may be out of print, but you can always try to search out a copy at The Strand or your local used book store. 

If you find yourself in the mood, check out Strand Book Store’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above.