Nick Turse
If you want a quick and thorough history of how American war was outsourced to corporations and robots, you’ll want to check out Tom Engelhardt’s “Remotely Piloted War, How Drone War Became the American Way of War.”  
For years, reporters and pundits have fawned over drones as shiny wonder-weapons, but Engelhardt writes, “put drones in a more familiar context, skip the awestruck commentary, and they should have been eerily familiar.”
We should have known that remotely piloted vehicles were heading toward us these last four decades, that they were, in fact, the most natural form of war for the All Volunteer Military (and the demobilized American public that went with it).
To explain, Engelhardt goes back to one of the most momentous, if underrated and little considered, decisions of the “American Century” — the decision, in the wake of Vietnam, to sever the military from potentially unruly draftees and create an all-professional army, while not backing down from the American global mission.  The amateurs, a democratic citizenry, were demobilized, sent home, and sidelined as a new American way of war was launched that would grow ever more remote (as in “remotely piloted aircraft”) from most Americans, while corporations, not citizens, would be mobilized for our new wars.  Read it the rest here.
photo credit: U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Erik Gudmundson

If you want a quick and thorough history of how American war was outsourced to corporations and robots, you’ll want to check out Tom Engelhardt’s “Remotely Piloted War, How Drone War Became the American Way of War.” 

For years, reporters and pundits have fawned over drones as shiny wonder-weapons, but Engelhardt writes, “put drones in a more familiar context, skip the awestruck commentary, and they should have been eerily familiar.”

We should have known that remotely piloted vehicles were heading toward us these last four decades, that they were, in fact, the most natural form of war for the All Volunteer Military (and the demobilized American public that went with it).

To explain, Engelhardt goes back to one of the most momentous, if underrated and little considered, decisions of the “American Century” — the decision, in the wake of Vietnam, to sever the military from potentially unruly draftees and create an all-professional army, while not backing down from the American global mission. The amateurs, a democratic citizenry, were demobilized, sent home, and sidelined as a new American way of war was launched that would grow ever more remote (as in “remotely piloted aircraft”) from most Americans, while corporations, not citizens, would be mobilized for our new wars.  Read it the rest here.

photo credit: U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Erik Gudmundson