Nick Turse
By the mid-1970s,Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s time-sharing system, Octopus, was the world’s most powerful research computer facility. It included four CDC 7600s (each with the power of 5,000 UNIVACs, about 10 million operations per second) and two CDC STARs. The computers were time-shared by users at more than 1,000 remote workstations around the Laboratory, many connected to television monitor display systems.
Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr

By the mid-1970s,Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s time-sharing system, Octopus, was the world’s most powerful research computer facility. It included four CDC 7600s (each with the power of 5,000 UNIVACs, about 10 million operations per second) and two CDC STARs. The computers were time-shared by users at more than 1,000 remote workstations around the Laboratory, many connected to television monitor display systems.

Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr

  1. tide-fashion reblogged this from nickturse
  2. nickturse reblogged this from nickturse