Nick Turse
Life of Wonderment Swoon Blurs the Line Between Art and Activism
"Since she began illegally pasting images around the city 15 years ago, Swoon has inspired a lot of wonderment. Born Caledonia Curry, she started her career as a street artist, but quickly leapfrogged to the attention of gallerists and museum curators, which let her expand to installation and performance art, often with an activist, progressive bent. Her intricate paper-cut portraits and cityscapes, often affixed to walls in hardscrabble places, are meant to disintegrate in place, a refrain to the life around them. Meanwhile, her socially minded work has focused on building cultural hubs for far-flung artistically welcoming communities."
Nice to see Callie and her art getting the attention it deserves, courtesy of the NYT…

Life of Wonderment
Swoon Blurs the Line Between Art and Activism

"Since she began illegally pasting images around the city 15 years ago, Swoon has inspired a lot of wonderment. Born Caledonia Curry, she started her career as a street artist, but quickly leapfrogged to the attention of gallerists and museum curators, which let her expand to installation and performance art, often with an activist, progressive bent. Her intricate paper-cut portraits and cityscapes, often affixed to walls in hardscrabble places, are meant to disintegrate in place, a refrain to the life around them. Meanwhile, her socially minded work has focused on building cultural hubs for far-flung artistically welcoming communities."

Nice to see Callie and her art getting the attention it deserves, courtesy of the NYT




You tax dollars at work, America!
Exclusive: U.S. Taxpayers To Spend $400,000 For A Camel Sculpture In Pakistan
Kudos to Brian McFadden for this can’t miss cartoon!

Kudos to Brian McFadden for this can’t miss cartoon!

storyboard:

Wall Dogs: The Midair Muralists Who Paint New York

It’s 8am in Soho, the thermometer reads just above freezing, and the sky is bleak. Taxis splash down the streets; New Yorkers stride with their heads down, leaping over puddles, carelessly bumping into each other. Everyone wants to get out of the cold, out of the rain, into the warmth.

Ten stories above — on a long, skinny platform hanging from the facade of a building at Canal and Mercer in downtown Manhattan — it’s a different story. Climbers’ ropes secured around their torsos, Jason Coatney and Armando Balmaceda stand in a melange of open paint cans and brushes. These two muralists of Colossal Media, the largest hand-painted advertising company in America, are heavily layered in sweatshirts and raincoats. But in this industry, c’est la vie. Paintbrushes in their fingerless-gloved hands, earbuds in their ears — “I like to start out with Miles Davis in the morning,” Coatney smiles, his breath visible in the frigid air — they begin yet another workday in the sky.

Read More

Does Penguin Books know that their mascot is moonlighting as the logo of an air conditioning contractor from Brooklyn?  Or did they let him go because he appears to have let himself go? 

Does Penguin Books know that their mascot is moonlighting as the logo of an air conditioning contractor from Brooklyn?  Or did they let him go because he appears to have let himself go? 

Photo

guardian:

image

Photograph: Zhao Jun/Xinhua Press/Corbis

Dancers of the China Disabled People’s Performing Art Troupe give a performance in Wuhan, China.

You can follow our photo coverage of the day’s events in the UK and around the world here.

Flavorpill presents Penguin Bond, a 2008 series of reprints with “mildly psychedelic, ’60s- and ’70s-retro portraits of each novel’s iconic Bond girl” as designed by Michael Gillette, on the cover.

pulitzercenter:

Tattooing, both permanent and temporary, emerged as a topic in a few recent Pulitzer Center stories. Student fellow Yasmin Bendaas traced the tattoos for her reporting project in Algeria, where the origins of the marks are not clear. Photo by Yasmin Bendaas. Algeria, 2012. Some believe the…

theatlantic:

Syria’s Spray-Can Revolution

Seeing Syria’s children as passive victims of a tyrannical regime, however, underestimates their role in the revolt. If they’ve been victims, they’ve also been protagonists. Think back to how all this began. In March 2011, 10 Syrians between the ages of 9 and 15, inspired by the rebellions in Egypt and Tunisia, daubed The people want to topple the regime! on the walls of a school building in the neglected provincial city of Dara’a. The vicious reaction of the secret police, or mukhabarat — they arrested and, by some accounts, tortured the children — led to popular demonstrations; from these spiraled everything else. This isn’t been a samizdat revolution, sparked by epistles from dissident intellectuals. It was started by the spray cans of schoolchildren, and by other young people who then turned to Facebook and YouTube to get the message out.

Read more. [Image: Amr Dalsh/Reuters]

theatlantic:

Syria’s Spray-Can Revolution

Seeing Syria’s children as passive victims of a tyrannical regime, however, underestimates their role in the revolt. If they’ve been victims, they’ve also been protagonists. Think back to how all this began. In March 2011, 10 Syrians between the ages of 9 and 15, inspired by the rebellions in Egypt and Tunisia, daubed The people want to topple the regime! on the walls of a school building in the neglected provincial city of Dara’a. The vicious reaction of the secret police, or mukhabarat — they arrested and, by some accounts, tortured the children — led to popular demonstrations; from these spiraled everything else. This isn’t been a samizdat revolution, sparked by epistles from dissident intellectuals. It was started by the spray cans of schoolchildren, and by other young people who then turned to Facebook and YouTube to get the message out.

Read more. [Image: Amr Dalsh/Reuters]