Nick Turse
Decades After Khmer Rouge’s Rule, 2 Senior Leaders Are Convicted in Cambodia

The chief judge, Nil Nonn, said the court found that there had been “a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population of Cambodia.” The two were convicted of murder and extermination, among other crimes, and sentenced to life in prison.

Decades After Khmer Rouge’s Rule, 2 Senior Leaders Are Convicted in Cambodia

The chief judge, Nil Nonn, said the court found that there had been “a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population of Cambodia.” The two were convicted of murder and extermination, among other crimes, and sentenced to life in prison.

When he raped me, I wasn’t in a position where I could have cried for help. He would have killed me. Later, if I would have reported him, they [Khmer Rouge cadres] would have killed him, but they would have also killed me
Rys Yamlas, a villager who was raped 35 years ago by a Khmer Rouge soldier and recently came forward to give public testimony about the attack.  For the full story, courtesy of IRIN, see “Khmer Rouge sexual violence survivors break silence
It still hurts, but letting the world know about my story makes me feel better.
Rys Yamlas, a villager who was raped 35 years ago by a Khmer Rouge soldier and recently came forward to give public testimony about the attack.  For the full story, courtesy of IRIN, see “Khmer Rouge sexual violence survivors break silence
Khmer Rouge trial nears end, with tarnished legacy - CSMonitor.com
Youk Chhang, a survivor of the Khmer Rouge who now heads the Documentation Center of Cambodia, housing thousands of archival materials, said regardless of its problems, the court served the purpose of moving Cambodia out of the shadow of the Killing Fields.   
“I would not conclude based on the verdicts of Case 002 or 001. We have to go all the way. It’s a long walk for Cambodia since the collapse of the Khmer Rouge. We walked back to the village, we walked back to the some of the towns. We have to walk until the end,” he says.
Youk Chhang, a survivor of the Khmer Rouge who now heads the Documentation Center of Cambodia, housing thousands of archival materials, said regardless of its problems, the court served the purpose of moving Cambodia out of the shadow of the Killing Fields.   
“I would not conclude based on the verdicts of Case 002 or 001. We have to go all the way. It’s a long walk for Cambodia since the collapse of the Khmer Rouge. We walked back to the village, we walked back to the some of the towns. We have to walk until the end,” he says.

Khmer Rouge trial nears end, with tarnished legacy - CSMonitor.com

Youk Chhang, a survivor of the Khmer Rouge who now heads the Documentation Center of Cambodia, housing thousands of archival materials, said regardless of its problems, the court served the purpose of moving Cambodia out of the shadow of the Killing Fields.   

“I would not conclude based on the verdicts of Case 002 or 001. We have to go all the way. It’s a long walk for Cambodia since the collapse of the Khmer Rouge. We walked back to the village, we walked back to the some of the towns. We have to walk until the end,” he says.

Youk Chhang, a survivor of the Khmer Rouge who now heads the Documentation Center of Cambodia, housing thousands of archival materials, said regardless of its problems, the court served the purpose of moving Cambodia out of the shadow of the Killing Fields.   

“I would not conclude based on the verdicts of Case 002 or 001. We have to go all the way. It’s a long walk for Cambodia since the collapse of the Khmer Rouge. We walked back to the village, we walked back to the some of the towns. We have to walk until the end,” he says.

US Bombing of Cambodia during Vietnam War (time-lapse; rate: 4 weeks / second)

liquidnight:

Micheline Dullin
From Cambodge, 1958-1964
[via Le Journal De La Photographie]

Cambodian men continued to be frequently trafficked for labour exploitation purposes according to a report by the International Organization for Migration (IOM).  According to the United Nations’ Inter-Agency Project on Human Trafficking, “thousands of Cambodians are trafficked annually. Cambodia is the sixth most frequent country of origin for trafficking victims after Ukraine, Haiti, Yemen, Laos and Uzbekistan.”
 

Second Cambodian land rights activist Bopha sentenced to three years
Phnom penh, Cambodia. 27th December 2012 — Protester Nget Khun, 72, clashes with riot police after finding out Yorn Bopha was sentenced to three years in jail.  Land rights activist Yorn Bopha, her husband and brothers were convicted of intentional violence and sentenced to three years in prison in Phnom Penh. Yorn Bopha has been declared a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International.
© Erika Pineros/Demotix/Corbis

Second Cambodian land rights activist Bopha sentenced to three years

Phnom penh, Cambodia. 27th December 2012 — Protester Nget Khun, 72, clashes with riot police after finding out Yorn Bopha was sentenced to three years in jail.  Land rights activist Yorn Bopha, her husband and brothers were convicted of intentional violence and sentenced to three years in prison in Phnom Penh. Yorn Bopha has been declared a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International.

© Erika Pineros/Demotix/Corbis

Mother of land rights activist Yorn Bopha collapses in front of a police barricade after finding out her daughter was sentenced to three years in jail. — Land rights activist Yorn Bopha, her husband and brothers were convicted of intentional violence and sentenced to three years in prison in Phnom Penh. Yorn Bopha has been declared a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International.
© Erika Pineros/Demotix/Corbis

Mother of land rights activist Yorn Bopha collapses in front of a police barricade after finding out her daughter was sentenced to three years in jail. — Land rights activist Yorn Bopha, her husband and brothers were convicted of intentional violence and sentenced to three years in prison in Phnom Penh. Yorn Bopha has been declared a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International.

© Erika Pineros/Demotix/Corbis

Paul Vrieze and Neou Vannarin at Global Post report that as “destruction of Cambodia’s tropical forests intensifies, concerned villagers and activists across this poor, small Southeast Asian nation are rising up to defend their country’s precious resources. But by doing so, they are becoming targets for persecution, violence and even killings, by powerful private interests that profit from the timber trade.”
(via Cambodia: shrinking forests breed violence | GlobalPost)

as “destruction of Cambodia’s tropical forests intensifies, concerned villagers and activists across this poor, small Southeast Asian nation are rising up to defend their country’s precious resources. But by doing so, they are becoming targets for persecution, violence and even killings, by powerful private interests that profit from the timber trade.”

(via Cambodia: shrinking forests breed violence | GlobalPost)