Nick Turse
They killed my father and took away his body. We felt so sad and tearful and we ran away. Now my aunty is taking care of me. I don’t know if I should stay here or go back to our village. If we go back, what if Seleka kill us, then what will I become?

Estani Gbeya, an eight year-old orphan from the village of Betoko in Central African Republic.  His mother died of disease a year ago.  His father was shot and killed by a fighter from the Seleka rebel group that staged a coup in the country earlier this year.

BBC News - Central African Republic: Where have all the people gone?

Under pressure, the Obama administration withdrew rules barring young laborers from dangerous work—a decision with grave consequences.
(via Regulations Are Killed, and Kids Die | The Nation)

Under pressure, the Obama administration withdrew rules barring young laborers from dangerous work—a decision with grave consequences.

(via Regulations Are Killed, and Kids Die | The Nation)

 Girls still sent to Kashmir for forced weddings 
According to the United Nations’ news agency, IRIN, “hundreds of cases of forced marriage are thought to take place annually, involving British nationals married against their will in Kashmir, particularly in and around the industrial town of Mirpur.”

Girls still sent to Kashmir for forced weddings 

According to the United Nations’ news agency, IRIN, “hundreds of cases of forced marriage are thought to take place annually, involving British nationals married against their will in Kashmir, particularly in and around the industrial town of Mirpur.”

doctorswithoutborders:


Afghanistan: Treating Child Malnutrition in Helmand “She was vomiting and had diarrhea, and she kept losing weight,” says Mariam of her five-month-old granddaughter Nazia. “Her mother just didn’t have enough milk to feed her. We went to a private clinic but they couldn’t help us, and finally we drove here from our home district of Sangin. Nazia is feeling a little better now.”  Nazia, who still has a distended belly and a clearly visible rib cage, is one of the patients in the MSF herapeutic feeding center in Boost hospital in Lashkargah, the capital of Afghanistan’s Helmand province.  Boost hospital, where MSF has been working since 2009, is one of only two hospitals in all of southern Afghanistan. Helmand is one of the country’s most war-ravaged provinces, and has seen intense fighting over the past decades. It is home to a largely poor, rural population, even if there are signs of a growing middle class in Lashkargah.  MSF opened its feeding center in December 2011 to tackle the chronic problem of malnutrition among children in Helmand. This specialized unit helps children on the verge of starvation gain weight through assisted feeding.  Photo: An MSF staff member examines a child for malnutrition at Boost hospital.  Afghanistan 2012 © Camille Gillardeau

doctorswithoutborders:

Afghanistan: Treating Child Malnutrition in Helmand

“She was vomiting and had diarrhea, and she kept losing weight,” says Mariam of her five-month-old granddaughter Nazia. “Her mother just didn’t have enough milk to feed her. We went to a private clinic but they couldn’t help us, and finally we drove here from our home district of Sangin. Nazia is feeling a little better now.”

Nazia, who still has a distended belly and a clearly visible rib cage, is one of the patients in the MSF herapeutic feeding center in Boost hospital in Lashkargah, the capital of Afghanistan’s Helmand province.

Boost hospital, where MSF has been working since 2009, is one of only two hospitals in all of southern Afghanistan. Helmand is one of the country’s most war-ravaged provinces, and has seen intense fighting over the past decades. It is home to a largely poor, rural population, even if there are signs of a growing middle class in Lashkargah.

MSF opened its feeding center in December 2011 to tackle the chronic problem of malnutrition among children in Helmand. This specialized unit helps children on the verge of starvation gain weight through assisted feeding.

Photo: An MSF staff member examines a child for malnutrition at Boost hospital.

Afghanistan 2012 © Camille Gillardeau

Every single day, 452 women in sub-Saharan Africa die from pregnancy-related causes; that’s 18 women every hour.
killanythingthatmoves:

One of a group of “lime gatherers” in South Vietnam’s Binh Long Province killed in August 1970 by soldiers from the U.S. 25th Infantry Division.  Photo from:

Buy the book:     Also available as an ebook:

killanythingthatmoves:

One of a group of “lime gatherers” in South Vietnam’s Binh Long Province killed in August 1970 by soldiers from the U.S. 25th Infantry Division.  Photo from:

image

Buy the book:
image image image image

Also available as an ebook:
image image image image image

Photographs from the My Lai massacre, March 16, 1968.

The United Nations’ news agency, IRIN, reports on desperate circumstances in the Mbéra refugee camp in eastern Mauritania which is home to 55,000 Malians.  Just under one in five children “is malnourished, and 4.6 percent are severely malnourished - two to three times the national average, according to a just-released November survey by NGO Médecins sans Frontières (MSF).” Children under five “are dying mainly from a combination of malnutrition and malaria, respiratory infections and diarrhoea, according to MSF head in Mauritania Karl Nawezi, who describes the situation as ‘alarming and unacceptable’”.
For the full story (which you’re unlikely to to read about on the front page of any western paper, much less see on the nightly news) go to: IRIN Africa | MAURITANIA: Refugees face “alarming” malnutrition, mortality rates

The United Nations’ news agency, IRIN, reports on desperate circumstances in the Mbéra refugee camp in eastern Mauritania which is home to 55,000 Malians.  Just under one in five children “is malnourished, and 4.6 percent are severely malnourished - two to three times the national average, according to a just-released November survey by NGO Médecins sans Frontières (MSF).”

Children under five “are dying mainly from a combination of malnutrition and malaria, respiratory infections and diarrhoea, according to MSF head in Mauritania Karl Nawezi, who describes the situation as ‘alarming and unacceptable’”.

For the full story (which you’re unlikely to to read about on the front page of any western paper, much less see on the nightly news) go to: IRIN Africa | MAURITANIA: Refugees face “alarming” malnutrition, mortality rates

nickturse:

A child’s drawing of the civil war in Syria. Many children who have stayed in the increasingly ravaged country “face bombardment, food shortages and bitter cold without fuel or school.”
Bradley Secker / For The Washington Post
(via Syrian students learn to adjust - The Washington Post)

nickturse:

A child’s drawing of the civil war in Syria. Many children who have stayed in the increasingly ravaged country “face bombardment, food shortages and bitter cold without fuel or school.”

Bradley Secker / For The Washington Post

(via Syrian students learn to adjust - The Washington Post)

timelightbox:

Dec. 30, 2012. A boy watches men dig graves for future casualties of Syria’s civil conflict at Sheikh Saeed cemetery in Azaz city, north of Aleppo, Syria. (Ahmed Jadallah—Reuters)
See more of the week’s best images at TIME LightBox

timelightbox:

Dec. 30, 2012. A boy watches men dig graves for future casualties of Syria’s civil conflict at Sheikh Saeed cemetery in Azaz city, north of Aleppo, Syria. (Ahmed Jadallah—Reuters)

See more of the week’s best images at TIME LightBox