Nick Turse
Supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi gather in Helwan Area.
© Nameer Galal/NurPhoto/NurPhoto/Corbis

Supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi gather in Helwan Area.

© Nameer Galal/NurPhoto/NurPhoto/Corbis

Most Bedouins from Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula never think to register their marriages. A palm leaf from the father of the bride to the groom is enough to mark the union; families and tribal elders stand witness to the ceremony.

But not having a marriage certificate, or ID card, has many disadvantages. Without proper papers you are cut off from government services. Talal Rashid, 42, has no papers and struggles to get health care for his wife, and education for his children.

One measure of how complicated Egyptian politics has become is that hardly anyone was surprised by the outcome of the constitutional referendum in late December. Amid the largest anti-government protests since the 2011 revolution, and following defections from his own cabinet and supporters, President Mohamed Morsi orchestrated a 64 percent approval vote for a new constitution. It had been hastily drawn up by his political allies and subjected to withering criticism; and there was low voter turnout and widespread indications of tampering. Nonetheless, the result seemed to show that, for all the millions of Egyptians who have lost patience with the new leadership, there are many others who continue to crave stability, even if the price is another authoritarian government.
Yasmine El Rashidi, Egypt: Whose Constitution? (via nybooks)

globalpost:

From Cairo, GlobalPost’s Erin Cunningham said the protests have remained relatively calm. “No major developments around the protests tonight so far. They’re happening, and they’re big. But no clashes,” she wrote on Tuesday night.

She added: “Protestors did tear down at least part of the concrete wall the presidential Republican Guard built several days ago in defense of the palace. They broke through the security cordon this evening (as they’ve done several times), but they did not storm the palace.”

Read more: Gunmen attack Tahrir Square as Cairo braces for rival protests

nbcnews:

Opponents reject Morsi’s calls for dialogue after deadly Cairo clashes
(Photo: Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters)
President Mohamed Morsi on Thursday invited political groups and legal figures to meet for a national dialogue on solutions to Egypt’s political crisis after clashes between his supporters and his foes left seven dead and hundreds wounded.
Read the complete story.

nbcnews:

Opponents reject Morsi’s calls for dialogue after deadly Cairo clashes

(Photo: Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters)

President Mohamed Morsi on Thursday invited political groups and legal figures to meet for a national dialogue on solutions to Egypt’s political crisis after clashes between his supporters and his foes left seven dead and hundreds wounded.

Read the complete story.

pritheworld:

Tanks Around Cairo Palace
Egyptian soldiers have surrounded the presidential palace in Cairo with barbed wire and tanks, after ordering all protesters to leave.
It’s the latest escalation in tensions between Islamist leader Mohammed Morsi and his opponents.
Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent for the Financial Times, who is in Cairo.

pritheworld:

Tanks Around Cairo Palace

Egyptian soldiers have surrounded the presidential palace in Cairo with barbed wire and tanks, after ordering all protesters to leave.

It’s the latest escalation in tensions between Islamist leader Mohammed Morsi and his opponents.

Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent for the Financial Times, who is in Cairo.

pulitzercenter:

Marwa serves as her younger cousin Abdel’s de facto tutor. For youth like Marwa and Abdel, Egypt’s inadequate education system cements the stark social and economic inequalities that were at the very heart of the uprising that packed Tahrir Square. “When will it change” is the question Marwa says she asks herself everyday. Image and caption by Pulitzer Center grantee Lauren E. Bohn. Egypt, 2012. Read the full story here at Pulitzercenter.org: http://bit.ly/PAjNPc.

pulitzercenter:

Marwa serves as her younger cousin Abdel’s de facto tutor. For youth like Marwa and Abdel, Egypt’s inadequate education system cements the stark social and economic inequalities that were at the very heart of the uprising that packed Tahrir Square. “When will it change” is the question Marwa says she asks herself everyday. Image and caption by Pulitzer Center grantee Lauren E. Bohn. Egypt, 2012. Read the full story here at Pulitzercenter.org: http://bit.ly/PAjNPc.

thepoliticalnotebook:

More: Mohammed Morsi wins Egypt’s presidential runoff with a total of 13,230,131 votes. Ahmed Shafiq received 12,347,380 votes. [Al Jazeera’s Egypt Live Blog]

Above: Side-by-side screenshots of Al Jazeera English and Arabic announcing the Muslim Brotherhood’s win over shots of a packed Tahrir Square. 

Protests Erupt in Wake of Official First Round Presidential Election Results

egyptreports:

Protests erupted last night after final results were announced in the country’s first-ever competitive presidential election. The top two candidates in the first round of the race are Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood and Ahmed Shafik, Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister. This is the report that we aired on Democracy Now! today:

thepoliticalnotebook:

So this one time I was published in an ebook and had no idea. Tasbeeh messaged me yesterday to let me know she had just discovered that the two of us had been published in a McSweeney’s/Byliner e-publication this past May called: Now That We Have Tasted Hope: Voices from the Arab Spring.
Several revolutionary song translations from a handful of countries, accompanied by backgrounder information, which I gave McSweeney’s last fall, are published here alongside a number of very cool primary source documents from Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Yemen and Bahrain. My song translations appear in the Libya, Tunisia, Egypt and Syria sections and the whole collection is full of other songs, poems, blog posts, flyers, speech translations and republished essays like Tasbeeh’s. It costs 4.99 to download on Amazon and 3.82 on Google and is available at a few other ebook sellers, if you want to look at the collection. And if you can, you should. It has a quite incredible array of material.
A very important thing I want to note: I contributed several translations to McSweeney’s, including songs by Ramy Essam, Ibn Thabit and Ibrahim Qashoush, but they credited me with the translation of Tunisian singer Amel Mathlouthi’s haunting “Kelmti Horra (My Word is Free).” While I was the one who found the lyrics and wrote the background information for the song, those song lyrics are not, I repeat not, my own. The credit goes to Arab Song Lyrics and Translation, which you should check out for a ton of other songs. My deepest apologies for the mix-up.

thepoliticalnotebook:

So this one time I was published in an ebook and had no idea. Tasbeeh messaged me yesterday to let me know she had just discovered that the two of us had been published in a McSweeney’s/Byliner e-publication this past May called: Now That We Have Tasted Hope: Voices from the Arab Spring.

Several revolutionary song translations from a handful of countries, accompanied by backgrounder information, which I gave McSweeney’s last fall, are published here alongside a number of very cool primary source documents from Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Yemen and Bahrain. My song translations appear in the Libya, Tunisia, Egypt and Syria sections and the whole collection is full of other songs, poems, blog posts, flyers, speech translations and republished essays like Tasbeeh’s. It costs 4.99 to download on Amazon and 3.82 on Google and is available at a few other ebook sellers, if you want to look at the collection. And if you can, you should. It has a quite incredible array of material.

A very important thing I want to note: I contributed several translations to McSweeney’s, including songs by Ramy Essam, Ibn Thabit and Ibrahim Qashoush, but they credited me with the translation of Tunisian singer Amel Mathlouthi’s haunting “Kelmti Horra (My Word is Free).” While I was the one who found the lyrics and wrote the background information for the song, those song lyrics are not, I repeat not, my own. The credit goes to Arab Song Lyrics and Translation, which you should check out for a ton of other songs. My deepest apologies for the mix-up.