Nick Turse

newyorker:

As we near the end of another year marked by the revolutions that continue to roil the Middle East, punctuated at this year-end with the recent conflagration in Gaza, Magnum has published “Magnum Revolution: 65 Years of Fighting for Freedom,” a collection of some of the most powerful photographs of the convulsions of conflict by the agency’s renowned photographers.  Click-through for a selection.

Do you know what a naval blockade means for the people in Gaza? There’s no food for a few days. For example, suppose there’s an attack in Netanya, so they impose a naval blockade for four days on the entire Strip. No seagoing vessel can leave. A Dabur patrol boat is stationed at the entrance to the port, if they try to go out, within seconds the soldiers shoot at the bow and even deploy attack helicopters to scare them. We did a lot of operations with attack helicopters — they don’t shoot much because they prefer to let us deal with that, but they’re there to scare people, they circle over their heads. All of a sudden there’s a Cobra right over your head, stirring up the wind and throwing everything around.
An Israeli Navy veteran talks about an operation off the coast of Gaza, from Oded Na’aman, Is Gaza Outside Israel? | TomDispatch
It was a battalion operation. They spread out over the whole village, took over the school, smashed the locks, the classrooms. One was used as the investigation room for the Shin Bet, one room for detainees, one for the soldiers to rest. We went in house by house, banging on the door at two in the morning. The family’s dying of fear, the girls are peeing in their pants with fear. We go into the house and turn everything upside down.
An Israeli soldier from the Kfir Brigade talks about a 2009 military operation in Nablus district in the West Bank, from Oded Na’aman, Is Gaza Outside Israel? | TomDispatch (via civiliansuffering)
I counted how many bullets I had left — I’d shot ten bullets. The whole thing was terrifying — more and more and more noise. It all took about a second and a half. And then they took out the bodies, carried the bodies. We went to a debriefing. I’ll never forget when they brought the bodies out at the base. We were standing two meters away in a semicircle, the bodies were covered in flies, and we had the debriefing. It was, “Great job, a success. Someone shot the wrong car, and we’ll talk about the rest back on the base.” I was in total shock from all the bullets, from the crazy noise. We saw it on the video, it was all documented on video for the debriefing. I saw all the things that I told you, the people running, the minute of gunfire, I don’t know if it’s twenty seconds or a minute, but it was hundreds of bullets and it was clear that the people had been killed, but the gunfire went on and the soldiers were running from the armored truck. What I saw was a bunch of bloodthirsty guys firing an insane amount of bullets, and at the wrong car, too. The video was just awful, and then the unit commander got up. I’m sure we’ll be hearing a lot from him.
An Israeli Special Forces veteran talks about a “elimination operation” in Gaza, from Oded Na’aman, Is Gaza Outside Israel? | TomDispatch
Do you know what a naval blockade means for the people in Gaza? There’s no food for a few days. For example, suppose there’s an attack in Netanya, so they impose a naval blockade for four days on the entire Strip. No seagoing vessel can leave. A Dabur patrol boat is stationed at the entrance to the port, if they try to go out, within seconds the soldiers shoot at the bow and even deploy attack helicopters to scare them. We did a lot of operations with attack helicopters — they don’t shoot much because they prefer to let us deal with that, but they’re there to scare people, they circle over their heads. All of a sudden there’s a Cobra right over your head, stirring up the wind and throwing everything around.
An Israeli Navy veteran talks about an operation off the coast of Gaza, from Oded Na’aman, Is Gaza Outside Israel? | TomDispatch
It was a battalion operation. They spread out over the whole village, took over the school, smashed the locks, the classrooms. One was used as the investigation room for the Shin Bet, one room for detainees, one for the soldiers to rest. We went in house by house, banging on the door at two in the morning. The family’s dying of fear, the girls are peeing in their pants with fear. We go into the house and turn everything upside down.
An Israeli soldier from the Kfir Brigade talks about a 2009 military operation in Nablus district in the West Bank, from Oded Na’aman, Is Gaza Outside Israel? | TomDispatch
Barak wanted to end it, Lieberman demanded a ground invasion, and Netanyahu vacillated. Behind the scenes of the Forum of Three’s meetings on the Gaza operation. The American message was clear:
Adopting Egypt’s cease- fire draft was much the preferred choice — even though the principles for a cease-fire being proposed by Egypt were much closer to Hamas’ positions than to its own.
thepoliticalnotebook:

AP photographer Bernat Armangué, who took some of the most widely seen and poignant photographs of Gaza during the recent eight day conflict between Hamas and Israel, wrote in The Guardian about his experiences taking these pictures.
He said of the above photo, of a man kissing the hand of a dead relative in the morgue at Shifa Hospital in Gaza City:

This was the last picture I took that day. I spent most of the day taking photographs of Palestinian rescue workers recovering people under the rubble of homes – some of them alive, some of them dead. That day 11 members of the al-Dallu family were killed when an Israeli missile struck the two-storey home of the family in a residential area of Gaza City. Some bodies were recovered and brought to the morgue, so I went there to take some pictures. While I was there, another family came to check if it was true that one of their relatives had been killed. They cried, held his body and one of them kissed his hand while saying goodbye. It was a rare tender moment there.

Read the whole piece at The Guardian.

thepoliticalnotebook:

AP photographer Bernat Armangué, who took some of the most widely seen and poignant photographs of Gaza during the recent eight day conflict between Hamas and Israel, wrote in The Guardian about his experiences taking these pictures.

He said of the above photo, of a man kissing the hand of a dead relative in the morgue at Shifa Hospital in Gaza City:

This was the last picture I took that day. I spent most of the day taking photographs of Palestinian rescue workers recovering people under the rubble of homes – some of them alive, some of them dead. That day 11 members of the al-Dallu family were killed when an Israeli missile struck the two-storey home of the family in a residential area of Gaza City. Some bodies were recovered and brought to the morgue, so I went there to take some pictures. While I was there, another family came to check if it was true that one of their relatives had been killed. They cried, held his body and one of them kissed his hand while saying goodbye. It was a rare tender moment there.

Read the whole piece at The Guardian.

It’s very hard now, with many injured people coming every hour. Women and children outnumbered men, especially with the new wave [of attacks] targeting houses and civilian buildings
Ibrahim Jirjawi, a nurse on the orthopaedic ward at Shifa hospital in the Gaza Strip, from a report by the United Nation’s IRIN News Agency: “Gaza hospitals need more drugs”
inothernews:

MADNESS  An Israeli airstrike on a home in Gaza City killed 11 people — including children — on Sunday.  Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had warned of an “expansion” of hostilities against Palestinians for continued rocket attacks on Israel; the airstrikes have killed more than 50 residents in Gaza to date.  (Photo: Tyler Hicks / The New York Times)

inothernews:

MADNESS  An Israeli airstrike on a home in Gaza City killed 11 people — including children — on Sunday.  Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had warned of an “expansion” of hostilities against Palestinians for continued rocket attacks on Israel; the airstrikes have killed more than 50 residents in Gaza to date.  (Photo: Tyler Hicks / The New York Times)