Nick Turse
The BBC reports that Britain’s High Court “has rejected an attempt by a Pakistani man to force the UK government to reveal if it is providing intelligence for US drone strikes.” 
For the full story see BBC News: “High Court blocks US drone intelligence case”

The BBC reports that Britain’s High Court “has rejected an attempt by a Pakistani man to force the UK government to reveal if it is providing intelligence for US drone strikes.”

For the full story see BBC News: “High Court blocks US drone intelligence case”

reuters:

Twitter is appealing a judge’s decision requiring the social media company to turn over an Occupy Wall Street protester’s tweets and account information to Manhattan prosecutors.

In June, Criminal Court Judge Matthew Sciarrino ruled that releasing Malcolm Harris’s tweets would not violate his privacy, since he had posted them on a public website.

Harris, a Brooklyn-based writer, was arrested with hundreds of other Occupy members during a mass march across the Brooklyn Bridge last fall.

The case has focused attention on a number of murky legal questions surrounding the use of social media, including whether users own the content they post publicly and whether companies like Twitter can prevent authorities from using that information to prosecute social media users.

READ ON: Twitter appeals ruling to hand over Occupy protester’s tweets

joshsternberg:

Linda Greenhouse breaks down the Affordable Health Care Act’s opponent’s view:

Journalistic convention requires that when there are two identifiable sides to a story, each side gets its say, in neutral fashion, without the writer’s thumb on the scale. This rule presents a challenge when one side of a controversy obviously lacks merit. But mainstream journalism has learned to navigate those challenges, choosing evolution over “intelligent design,” for example, and treating climate change naysayers as cranks.

Court cases are trickier. It’s one thing to engage in prediction that flows from analysis: which side is most likely to win? It’s quite another to let readers in on the fact that one side’s argument is so manifestly weak that it doesn’t deserve to win. Journalistic accounts of court cases, at least in advance of a definitive ruling, understandably tend to take the safe course and treat the arguments on both sides with equal dignity. So it’s perhaps not surprising that just about half the public apparently believes that the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate is unconstitutional.

Free of convention, and fresh from reading the main briefs in the case to be argued before the Supreme Court next week, I’m here to tell you: that belief is simply wrong. The constitutional challenge to the law’s requirement for people to buy health insurance — specifically, the argument that the mandate exceeds Congress’s power under the Commerce Clause — is rhetorically powerful but analytically so weak that it dissolves on close inspection. There’s just no there there.

motherjones:

Important story you may have missed: Adam Serwer explains what Monday’s Boston terror case verdict case means for civil liberties:

[B[y convicting Mehanna of material support for terrorism based on his  online activities, the prosecution may have established a path through  which the government can throw people in prison on terrorism charges for  expressing abhorrent opinions, even if the individual in question has  no direct ties to a terrorist organization.

Full story here.

motherjones:

Important story you may have missed: Adam Serwer explains what Monday’s Boston terror case verdict case means for civil liberties:

[B[y convicting Mehanna of material support for terrorism based on his online activities, the prosecution may have established a path through which the government can throw people in prison on terrorism charges for expressing abhorrent opinions, even if the individual in question has no direct ties to a terrorist organization.

Full story here.