Nick Turse
Presidential candidate Dr. Abdullah Abdullah is surrounded by supporters at a rally in Kabul.
Credit: Lynsey Addario

Presidential candidate Dr. Abdullah Abdullah is surrounded by supporters at a rally in Kabul.

Credit: Lynsey Addario

At this Kabul wedding the bride is Fershta, 18. She wears a green dress for the ceremony—a color associated with prosperity and paradise in Islamic tradition. The groom is Amin Shaheen, son of film director Salim Shaheen.
Credit: Lynsey Addario

At this Kabul wedding the bride is Fershta, 18. She wears a green dress for the ceremony—a color associated with prosperity and paradise in Islamic tradition. The groom is Amin Shaheen, son of film director Salim Shaheen.

Credit: Lynsey Addario

A male Ethiopian surgeon, center left, shows the female staff at Malalai Maternity Hospital in Kabul how to repair a fistula—an abnormal hole between the vagina and bladder or rectum that can lead to infection and incontinence. The condition often occurs during childbirth in young mothers whose pelvises are not fully developed. If the problem isn’t corrected with surgery, a woman is typically seen as bringing shame upon the family and is shunned by her husband.
Credit: Lynsey Addario

A male Ethiopian surgeon, center left, shows the female staff at Malalai Maternity Hospital in Kabul how to repair a fistula—an abnormal hole between the vagina and bladder or rectum that can lead to infection and incontinence. The condition often occurs during childbirth in young mothers whose pelvises are not fully developed. If the problem isn’t corrected with surgery, a woman is typically seen as bringing shame upon the family and is shunned by her husband.

Credit: Lynsey Addario

All village women are invited to come to health and hygiene classes taught by a traveling midwife, right. She works for a mobile clinic sponsored by the United Nations Population Fund and the international medical relief group Merlin, which brings pre- and postnatal care to women in isolated villages like this one in northeastern Badakhshan Province.
Credit: Lynsey Addario

All village women are invited to come to health and hygiene classes taught by a traveling midwife, right. She works for a mobile clinic sponsored by the United Nations Population Fund and the international medical relief group Merlin, which brings pre- and postnatal care to women in isolated villages like this one in northeastern Badakhshan Province.

Credit: Lynsey Addario

Afghan policewomen handle AMD-65 rifles at a dusty firing range outside Kabul. They are trained by carabinieri, Italian military police from the local NATO troops. Insurgents often attack the police and very few women get permission to sign up from their husband and male relatives. Yet women are welcome recruits. They can take on tasks that men cannot because of Islamic custom. The pay is about $165 a month.
Credit: Lynsey Addario

Afghan policewomen handle AMD-65 rifles at a dusty firing range outside Kabul. They are trained by carabinieri, Italian military police from the local NATO troops. Insurgents often attack the police and very few women get permission to sign up from their husband and male relatives. Yet women are welcome recruits. They can take on tasks that men cannot because of Islamic custom. The pay is about $165 a month.

Credit: Lynsey Addario

A female inmate at a Mazar-e Sharif prison has just been released, prompting Maida-Khal, 22, to cry out because she is still trapped in her cell. When Maida-Khal was 12, she was married to a man of about 70 who was paralyzed. ‘I was so young, I couldn’t carry him because he was so heavy, so his brothers would beat me,’ she recalls. When she asked for a divorce four years ago, she was imprisoned.
Credit: Lynsey Addario

A female inmate at a Mazar-e Sharif prison has just been released, prompting Maida-Khal, 22, to cry out because she is still trapped in her cell. When Maida-Khal was 12, she was married to a man of about 70 who was paralyzed. ‘I was so young, I couldn’t carry him because he was so heavy, so his brothers would beat me,’ she recalls. When she asked for a divorce four years ago, she was imprisoned.

Credit: Lynsey Addario

Two women on the side of the mountain, in burkas and without a man. In Afghanistan you seldom see an unaccompanied woman. Noor Nisa, about 18, is pregnant; her water had just broken. Her husband, whose first wife had died during childbirth, was determined to get Noor Nisa to the hospital in Faizabad, a four-hour drive from their village in Badakhshan Province. His borrowed car broke down, so he went to find another vehicle.
Credit: Lynsey Addario

Two women on the side of the mountain, in burkas and without a man. In Afghanistan you seldom see an unaccompanied woman. Noor Nisa, about 18, is pregnant; her water had just broken. Her husband, whose first wife had died during childbirth, was determined to get Noor Nisa to the hospital in Faizabad, a four-hour drive from their village in Badakhshan Province. His borrowed car broke down, so he went to find another vehicle.

Credit: Lynsey Addario



Lynsey Addario: Before She Went Missing

From the Daily Beast:

Lynsey Addario, a veteran war photographer who shot Newsweek’s recent cover on George Clooney, is among the four Western journalists who disappeared in Libya. Listen to a moving telephone account from just before she vanished.

The New York Times on Wednesday reported that four of its journalists working in Libya were missing, including Lynsey Addario, a prize-winning war photographer who has covered Afghanistan and the Middle East for more than a decade.

The American photographer, who travels nearly 300 days of the year for her work, was briefly kidnapped in 2004 while on assignment in Iraq. Participating remotely in a Daily Beast conference last week, she gave a moving telephone account of her working circumstances for a panel on Women on the Frontlines.