Nick Turse
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campaignmoney:

1,014,484: That’s how many times television ads from President Barack Obama, Republican nominee Mitt Romney and other groups involved in the Nov. 6 election have aired during the general election campaign, according to Kantar Media’s CMAG.
The totals include spots that ran on national network, national cable and local broadcast stations between April 10, when Romney effectively became the Republican nominee, and Oct. 22, the most recent date for which CMAG data are available. The CMAG data don’t include ads that ran on local cable.
(Bloomberg)

campaignmoney:

1,014,484: That’s how many times television ads from President Barack Obama, Republican nominee Mitt Romney and other groups involved in the Nov. 6 election have aired during the general election campaign, according to Kantar Media’s CMAG.

The totals include spots that ran on national network, national cable and local broadcast stations between April 10, when Romney effectively became the Republican nominee, and Oct. 22, the most recent date for which CMAG data are available. The CMAG data don’t include ads that ran on local cable.

(Bloomberg)

reagan-was-a-horrible-president:

Further Gaffes from the Romney Video…

reagan-was-a-horrible-president:

Further Gaffes from the Romney Video…

newyorker:

John Cassidy breaks down the order of events in Cairo, Libya, and the U.S. over the past 24 hours, and considers how they might affect the Romney and Obama’s campaigns: http://nyr.kr/OHoY02

There will be plenty of time to discuss the rights and wrongs. But before getting into all that, I thought it might be worth setting down how the past twenty-four hours unfolded. With events taking place in three countries, on two continents, there has been a lot of confusion about who said what when. Here’s a quick timeline I put together from the Web. As far as I can see, Romney doesn’t come out of it looking any better….

Mitt Romney’s speech at the Republican National Convention in Tampa last week received a lower score than any presidential candidate’s convention speech since the poll starting asking the question in 1996, according to the polling firm Gallup.

campaignmoney:

During a rally with Mitt Romney at a coal mine in Ohio earlier this month, “The Pepper Pike company that owns the Century Mine told workers that attending the Aug. 14 Romney event would be both mandatory and unpaid.”

The mine was shut down for the day, the workers were not paid and employees…

thenewrepublic:

Why the Republican Party can’t renounce Sheldon Adelson.
In 2008, Sen. John McCain returned $50,000 when questions arose about how its donor had scored a defense contract. In February, President Obama returned more than $200,000 donated by several men linked to drug and assassination allegations in Mexico. These decisions reflected the basic calculation that it is worth more, politically, not to be tainted by questionable funds than to have the money to spend. Given the comparatively paltry sums, they were no-brainers.
But what about when many, many millions of dollars are at stake? What about when the donor is Sheldon Adelson, and he has given or pledged to give more than $70 million (!) to Republican groups this cycle? When he was put front-and-center at Mitt Romney’s speech in Jerusalem, and when Rep. Paul Ryan is headed to a fundraiser at the Adelson-owned Venetian three days after being announced as the vice-presidential nominee? What happens when a donor is, in effect, too big to fail? (Disclosure: I totally lost some money at the Venetian’s blackjack tables three years ago. It’s not the source of my agitation.)
Marc Tracy — “Sheldon Adelson: No One Man Should Have All That Power”

thenewrepublic:

Why the Republican Party can’t renounce Sheldon Adelson.

In 2008, Sen. John McCain returned $50,000 when questions arose about how its donor had scored a defense contract. In February, President Obama returned more than $200,000 donated by several men linked to drug and assassination allegations in Mexico. These decisions reflected the basic calculation that it is worth more, politically, not to be tainted by questionable funds than to have the money to spend. Given the comparatively paltry sums, they were no-brainers.

But what about when many, many millions of dollars are at stake? What about when the donor is Sheldon Adelson, and he has given or pledged to give more than $70 million (!) to Republican groups this cycle? When he was put front-and-center at Mitt Romney’s speech in Jerusalem, and when Rep. Paul Ryan is headed to a fundraiser at the Adelson-owned Venetian three days after being announced as the vice-presidential nominee? What happens when a donor is, in effect, too big to fail? (Disclosure: I totally lost some money at the Venetian’s blackjack tables three years ago. It’s not the source of my agitation.)

Marc Tracy — Sheldon Adelson: No One Man Should Have All That Power

Most interestingly, during our investigation, Republican nominee for US President Mitt Romney has been scrutinized recently for his abnormal increase in new followers (@mittromney), indicating that these followers had been purchased in the same way as the Dealers/Abuser scenario from our study. We do note that these followers could have been purchased by either himself, his associates or by his opponents. Particularly, on July 21st, 2012, his follower number went from 673,002 to 789,924, representing a gain of 116,922 or 17%. As this story picked up momentum, we quickly pulled his newest followers since the big breakout, (resulting in 152,966 new Twitter accounts), and can disclose several interesting statistics of these followers.

Statistics of Romney’s newest 152,966 Twitter followers(between Jul 21st and Jul 26th 2012):

- The number of Romney’s followers increased 17% (or 116,922) on a single day Jul 21, 2012, going from 673,002 to 789,924.

- 25% of these followers are less than 3 weeks old (created after July 17th 2012), 80% of them are less than 3 months old

- 23% or about 1/4 of these followers have no tweet

- 10% of these account has already been suspended by Twitter

An analysis of Twitter’s black market economy, including @mittromney’s new legion of fake followers. (via ensignau)
newyorker:


…as the New York Times put it in a banner front-page headline today, by putting Ryan on the ticket, Romney is “pushing fiscal issues to the forefront.” But if that kind of clarifying, substantive debate is in fact to materialize, Ryan (and Romney) will need to be a lot more explicit, and a lot more honest, about what their budget proposals would actually do to the U.S. government.
That may sound a bit strange, since so many stories about Ryan emphasize how serious and wonky he is, and insist that, unlike most politicians, he’s actually willing to talk in detail about the policies he’s advocating. Yet the reality of Ryan’s approach is actually very different…

Click-through to continue reading James Surowiecki on Paul Ryan’s budget games: http://nyr.kr/MQ2SMG

newyorker:

…as the New York Times put it in a banner front-page headline today, by putting Ryan on the ticket, Romney is “pushing fiscal issues to the forefront.” But if that kind of clarifying, substantive debate is in fact to materialize, Ryan (and Romney) will need to be a lot more explicit, and a lot more honest, about what their budget proposals would actually do to the U.S. government.

That may sound a bit strange, since so many stories about Ryan emphasize how serious and wonky he is, and insist that, unlike most politicians, he’s actually willing to talk in detail about the policies he’s advocating. Yet the reality of Ryan’s approach is actually very different…

Click-through to continue reading James Surowiecki on Paul Ryan’s budget games: http://nyr.kr/MQ2SMG