Nick Turse
One measure of how complicated Egyptian politics has become is that hardly anyone was surprised by the outcome of the constitutional referendum in late December. Amid the largest anti-government protests since the 2011 revolution, and following defections from his own cabinet and supporters, President Mohamed Morsi orchestrated a 64 percent approval vote for a new constitution. It had been hastily drawn up by his political allies and subjected to withering criticism; and there was low voter turnout and widespread indications of tampering. Nonetheless, the result seemed to show that, for all the millions of Egyptians who have lost patience with the new leadership, there are many others who continue to crave stability, even if the price is another authoritarian government.
Yasmine El Rashidi, Egypt: Whose Constitution? (via nybooks)
gettyimages:

Protesters Demonstrate Against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi
An Egyptian protester picks up a live tear gas round fired by riot police during demonstrations against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi near Tahrir Square on November 28, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt.
Demonstrations have been held after a week of tension and violent protest in response to Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi having awarded himself new constitutional powers, which many believe have been pushed through by the Muslim Brotherhood without inclusive consultation with other members of Egypt’s cabinet and political leadership.
Photo by Ed Giles/Getty Images

gettyimages:

Protesters Demonstrate Against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi

An Egyptian protester picks up a live tear gas round fired by riot police during demonstrations against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi near Tahrir Square on November 28, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt.

Demonstrations have been held after a week of tension and violent protest in response to Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi having awarded himself new constitutional powers, which many believe have been pushed through by the Muslim Brotherhood without inclusive consultation with other members of Egypt’s cabinet and political leadership.

Photo by Ed Giles/Getty Images

globalpost:

From Cairo, GlobalPost’s Erin Cunningham said the protests have remained relatively calm. “No major developments around the protests tonight so far. They’re happening, and they’re big. But no clashes,” she wrote on Tuesday night.

She added: “Protestors did tear down at least part of the concrete wall the presidential Republican Guard built several days ago in defense of the palace. They broke through the security cordon this evening (as they’ve done several times), but they did not storm the palace.”

Read more: Gunmen attack Tahrir Square as Cairo braces for rival protests