Nick Turse
Women shout slogans as they protest against the suicide of Amina al-Filali, 16 who was forced to marry the man who raped her outside parlament in Rabat on March 17, 2012. They called for changes to a penal code that allows a rapist to stay out of jail if he marries his victim with the consent of her parents. Sign reads ” Rape me, Marry me, My life is futile, I am Moroccan”. Getty

Women shout slogans as they protest against the suicide of Amina al-Filali, 16 who was forced to marry the man who raped her outside parlament in Rabat on March 17, 2012. They called for changes to a penal code that allows a rapist to stay out of jail if he marries his victim with the consent of her parents. Sign reads ” Rape me, Marry me, My life is futile, I am Moroccan”. Getty

sharquaouia:

He likes his favourite toys to be in good repair. In fact, King Mohammed VI of Morocco has been known to fly his Aston Martin on a Hercules transporter to the manufacturer in Britain for a tune-up.

More than five million of his subjects live on less than $1.50 a day. But “His Majesty”, as even close family members must call him, does not have to scrimp or save, for the people’s generosity is limitless. He gets $38 million a year in public funds as “pocket money”, which he spends as he pleases, according to the authors of Le Roi Predateur (The Predator King). The book, published in Paris this month, offers a rare insight into the extraordinarily lavish domain of one of the world’s last absolute monarchs. He spends $1.4m a year on pet food and twice that on his wardrobe.

His 12 palaces are kept fully staffed, airconditioned at a steady 17C and stocked with every delicacy known to man on the off-chance Mohammed might drop in. The palaces cost taxpayers $1.5m a day to run but the king uses only four of them.

Read more

Zing. I’m not crazy about how this piece was written, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t bring up some serious issues. These figures are fucking insane. This is what happens in a country where the ruler:

a. Governs the country unchecked.

b. Is borderline worshiped by a vast majority of the illiterate and rural populations, which comprise just about 50% of all Moroccans.

Mohammad VI is above all else, a human. He is not sacred and him tracing his familial lineage to the Prophet Muhammad does not place him above the very law which he has written, but also happens to be one of its worst offenders. 

Anyways, I’ve got a pdf file of the book mentioned in the above excerpt. It’s in French. If anyone wants to check it out, let me know.

thepoliticalnotebook:

A solidarity poster en français supporting the Moroccan reform/revolutionary movement: “Long live the fight of the Moroccan people! Freedom for the revolutionary prisoners! Down with the reactionary Moroccan regime and with French imperialism! 
[via]

thepoliticalnotebook:

A solidarity poster en français supporting the Moroccan reform/revolutionary movement: “Long live the fight of the Moroccan people! Freedom for the revolutionary prisoners! Down with the reactionary Moroccan regime and with French imperialism! 

[via]

charquaouia:

February 20th Movement activists perform a song, Long Live the People, which they wrote in support of the movement and the currently detained Moroccan rapper, Mouad Belghouat (L7a9ed)

mamfakinch:

Several Moroccan protesters, demanding more jobs in the northern city of Taza, have been wounded in clashes with the police.
Police car hit one of the demonstrators during the late Wednesday protests, leaving him in critical…

charquaouia:

Graphic footage of a young student after suffering from violent police repression during a protest in Taza, Morocco today, Jan. 4.

Mamfakinch is covering the ongoing events

thepoliticalnotebook:




An Incomplete List of the Best Protest Slogans and Revolutionary Catchphrases of 2011.الشعب يريد اسقاط النظام/Asha’ab yurīd isqāt anizām 
“The people want the fall of the regime” and it’s variations (The people want the fall of the Makhzen (ruling elite in Morocco), or the Field Marshal) is probably the most classic and well-known of all the chants. Its simplicity and versatility and its place in 2011’s incredible politics make it the shoo-in for first place on this list
We are the 99%
This has been an inescapable slogan, and has resonated very powerfully with people’s experiences of economic injustice around the world, becoming a rallying cry and a point of unification for Occupiers.
ارحل/Irhal!
The command, Leave!, is directed at despots, from Ali Abdullah Saleh to Field Marshal Tantawi. Another versatile protest chant that has been heard in revolutionary music, painted on faces and walls and shouted in the streets countless times over thecourse of 2011.
يمكنك ان تدهس الورود، لكنك لا تستطيع ان تؤخر الربيع
“You can trample the roses but you cannot delay the spring” hardly has the ubiquity of “Asha’ab yurīd isqāt anizzām,” but happens to be one of my personal favorites.
Strike like an Egyptian.
An expression of admiration and solidarity, playing on “Walk like an Egyptian,” acknowledging the incredible influence of the North African revolutions.
The people are too big to fail.
The play on the famous phrase said about banks captures perfectly the intentions of the Occupiers and the potency of the Occupy movement. 
كن مع الثورة/Kun ma’ athawra
A beautiful sentiment: be with the revolution. Based on the saying “Be with Allah.”
We are the power!
One of the more popular ones heard in recent Russian protests against Putin’s governance and rigged parliamentary elections.
هو يمشي مش هنمشي/”Huwa yimshī mish hanimshī.” 
This very catchy phrase, in Egyptian dialect, means “he will leave and we will not!”
Extras: Watch the teaser clip of director Stephen Savona’s documentary “Tahrir,” featuring footage of Egyptian protest chants. And watch Egyptian singer Ramy Essam perform his song “Irhal,” featuring a number of popular chants.
(Thanks to @ArabRevRap for input on this post!)
AFP/Getty photo via.
Any slogans in particular that you felt were amazing or influential in global protests this year?

thepoliticalnotebook:

An Incomplete List of the Best Protest Slogans and Revolutionary Catchphrases of 2011.
  • الشعب يريد اسقاط النظام/Asha’ab yurīd isqāt anizām 

“The people want the fall of the regime” and it’s variations (The people want the fall of the Makhzen (ruling elite in Morocco), or the Field Marshal) is probably the most classic and well-known of all the chants. Its simplicity and versatility and its place in 2011’s incredible politics make it the shoo-in for first place on this list

  • We are the 99%

This has been an inescapable slogan, and has resonated very powerfully with people’s experiences of economic injustice around the world, becoming a rallying cry and a point of unification for Occupiers.

  • ارحل/Irhal!

The command, Leave!, is directed at despots, from Ali Abdullah Saleh to Field Marshal Tantawi. Another versatile protest chant that has been heard in revolutionary music, painted on faces and walls and shouted in the streets countless times over thecourse of 2011.

  • يمكنك ان تدهس الورود، لكنك لا تستطيع ان تؤخر الربيع

“You can trample the roses but you cannot delay the spring” hardly has the ubiquity of “Asha’ab yurīd isqāt anizzām,” but happens to be one of my personal favorites.

  • Strike like an Egyptian.

An expression of admiration and solidarity, playing on “Walk like an Egyptian,” acknowledging the incredible influence of the North African revolutions.

  • The people are too big to fail.

The play on the famous phrase said about banks captures perfectly the intentions of the Occupiers and the potency of the Occupy movement. 

  • كن مع الثورة/Kun ma’ athawra

A beautiful sentiment: be with the revolution. Based on the saying “Be with Allah.”

  • We are the power!

One of the more popular ones heard in recent Russian protests against Putin’s governance and rigged parliamentary elections.

  • هو يمشي مش هنمشي/”Huwa yimshī mish hanimshī.” 

This very catchy phrase, in Egyptian dialect, means “he will leave and we will not!”

Extras: Watch the teaser clip of director Stephen Savona’s documentary “Tahrir,” featuring footage of Egyptian protest chants. And watch Egyptian singer Ramy Essam perform his song “Irhal,” featuring a number of popular chants.

(Thanks to @ArabRevRap for input on this post!)

AFP/Getty photo via.

Any slogans in particular that you felt were amazing or influential in global protests this year?

charquaouia:

This is the first march after the Adl wal Ihsan Islamist movement announced its separation from the February 20th Movement. Many speculated this would significantly reduce the numbers and would also undermine the February 20th Movement, though it seems it has only provided more motivation and will.

Footage from Safi

Footage from Fes

Footage from Ouarzazate

Footage from Rabat

Footage from Marrakech

Check out the February 20th Movement’s Facebook page for more videos and images.

This year, as protesters from Morocco to Saudi Arabia, Jordan to Kuwait were taking to the streets in the name of democracy, the security forces of those regimes struck back by threatening, jailing or attacking them. The Pentagon was there too — offering training in counterinsurgency, intelligence gathering and small unit tactics to those militaries and others around the Greater Middle East.

In “Making Repression Our Business, The Pentagon’s Secret Training Missions in the Middle East” at the Nation Institute’s TomDispatch.com, I pull back the curtain of Pentagon secrecy to reveal what Washington is really up to in the region and how it stands at odds with President Obama’s rhetoric.

Photos: (Above) U.S. Marines mentor Moroccan soldiers during a training exercise known as “African Lion 2011.”   (Below) U.S. soldiers and members of Royal Saudi Land Forces take part in “Friendship Two,” a joint training exercise between U.S. soldiers and R in Saudi Arabia earlier this year. DoD

This year, as protesters from Morocco to Saudi Arabia, Jordan to Kuwait were taking to the streets in the name of democracy, the security forces of those regimes struck back by threatening, jailing or attacking them. The Pentagon was there too — offering training in counterinsurgency, intelligence gathering and small unit tactics to those militaries and others around the Greater Middle East.

In “Making Repression Our Business, The Pentagon’s Secret Training Missions in the Middle East” at the Nation Institute’s TomDispatch.com, I pull back the curtain of Pentagon secrecy to reveal what Washington is really up to in the region and how it stands at odds with President Obama’s rhetoric.

Photos: (Above) U.S. Marines mentor Moroccan soldiers during a training exercise known as "African Lion 2011.”  (Below) U.S. soldiers and members of Royal Saudi Land Forces take part in “Friendship Two,” a joint training exercise between U.S. soldiers and R in Saudi Arabia earlier this year. DoD