Nick Turse
motherjones:


Roundup, New York City’s most heavily used liquid herbicide, is widely considered dangerous. And it’s coming to a picnic blanket near you. 

motherjones:

Roundup, New York City’s most heavily used liquid herbicide, is widely considered dangerous. And it’s coming to a picnic blanket near you. 

“Joey lives in Kentucky with his parents and older sister. He is 11 years old. He regularly accompanies his father on hunts. He owns two shotguns and a crossbow and made his first kill—a deer—at the age of seven. He is hoping to use his crossbow during the next hunting season as he has become tired of using a gun. When he is not out hunting, Joey attends school and enjoys watching television with his pet bearded dragon lizard, Lily.”
From James Mollison’s Where Children Sleep, which collects his images from 18 countries.
For more see from the series check out Mother Jones.

Joey lives in Kentucky with his parents and older sister. He is 11 years old. He regularly accompanies his father on hunts. He owns two shotguns and a crossbow and made his first kill—a deer—at the age of seven. He is hoping to use his crossbow during the next hunting season as he has become tired of using a gun. When he is not out hunting, Joey attends school and enjoys watching television with his pet bearded dragon lizard, Lily.”

From James Mollison’s Where Children Sleep, which collects his images from 18 countries.

For more see from the series check out Mother Jones.

magnumfoundation:

Ben Lowy
MotherJones
Ben Lowy’s iLibya was featured in MotherJones as part of the MotherJones-Magnum foundation partnership. His work in Libya using an iPhone examines the scars and new hopes of the revolution-torn nation.
View the essay here.

magnumfoundation:

Ben Lowy

MotherJones

Ben Lowy’s iLibya was featured in MotherJones as part of the MotherJones-Magnum foundation partnership. His work in Libya using an iPhone examines the scars and new hopes of the revolution-torn nation.

View the essay here.

theyoungturks:

GOP strategist Jack Burkman and Mother Jones reporter James West join the Power Panel to determine whether brush fires in Colorado and flooding in Florida should be linked to climate change. “This isn’t an inside the beltway conspiracy,” West says. “The evidence has been mounting for many, many years.” But Burkman says, “Even if it is true — so what? There’s nothing we can do about it anyway.”

longreads:


Ruby Session was shaking as she read on. The year was 2007, and the letter was addressed to her son Timothy Cole. “I have been trying to locate you since 1995 to tell you I wish to confess I did in fact commit the rape Lubbock wrongly convicted you of.”
Ruby sat down, stood up. A picture of Tim in a tuxedo, taken at his junior prom, smiled from the mantle. Before his trial the prosecutor had offered him a deal to plead to lesser charges. “Mother,” Tim had said, “I am not pleading guilty to something I didn’t do.” He was sentenced to 25 years in prison. Thirteen years later, he died behind bars.
The Texas criminal-justice system has long had a harsh reputation, but it has drawn renewed scrutiny with Gov. Rick Perry’s run for president. During the past 11 years, Perry has presided over 238 executions, including the infamous case of Cameron Todd Willingham, who was put to death based on a dubious arson investigation. In a September debate, Perry famously said that he had lost no sleep over the possibility of an innocent man being executed on his watch.

“No Country for Innocent Men.” — Beth Schwartzapfel, Mother Jones
See more #longreads on the death penalty

longreads:

Ruby Session was shaking as she read on. The year was 2007, and the letter was addressed to her son Timothy Cole. “I have been trying to locate you since 1995 to tell you I wish to confess I did in fact commit the rape Lubbock wrongly convicted you of.”

Ruby sat down, stood up. A picture of Tim in a tuxedo, taken at his junior prom, smiled from the mantle. Before his trial the prosecutor had offered him a deal to plead to lesser charges. “Mother,” Tim had said, “I am not pleading guilty to something I didn’t do.” He was sentenced to 25 years in prison. Thirteen years later, he died behind bars.

The Texas criminal-justice system has long had a harsh reputation, but it has drawn renewed scrutiny with Gov. Rick Perry’s run for president. During the past 11 years, Perry has presided over 238 executions, including the infamous case of Cameron Todd Willingham, who was put to death based on a dubious arson investigation. In a September debate, Perry famously said that he had lost no sleep over the possibility of an innocent man being executed on his watch.

“No Country for Innocent Men.” — Beth Schwartzapfel, Mother Jones

See more #longreads on the death penalty