Nick Turse
In a new 132-page report — Suppressing Protest: Human Rights Violations in the U.S. Response to Occupy Wall Street — members of a national consortium of law school clinics, lawyers, law professors and other legal experts “catalog 130 specific alleged incidents of excessive police force, and hundreds of additional violations, including unjustified arrests, abuse of journalists, unlawful closure of sidewalks and parks to protesters, and pervasive surveillance of peaceful activists” in New York City.  The experts note that, to date, only one police officer is known to have been disciplined for misconduct related to Occupy Wall Street protests in NYC.  Read the full report here.

In a new 132-page report — Suppressing Protest: Human Rights Violations in the U.S. Response to Occupy Wall Street — members of a national consortium of law school clinics, lawyers, law professors and other legal experts “catalog 130 specific alleged incidents of excessive police force, and hundreds of additional violations, including unjustified arrests, abuse of journalists, unlawful closure of sidewalks and parks to protesters, and pervasive surveillance of peaceful activists” in New York City.  The experts note that, to date, only one police officer is known to have been disciplined for misconduct related to Occupy Wall Street protests in NYC.  Read the full report here.

anarcho-queer:

Updated: Anonymous Leaks NYPD Footage Of Occupy’s Eviction From Zuccotti Park
Anonymous has leaked what they claim to be “hours” of footage of last year’s raid on Zuccotti Park shot by the NYPD from 14 different cameras. A short montage of the footage has been compiled together for a YouTube video, but the file available for download is 11 GB. “While it’s clear that a lot of this police footage is incomplete and has been edited, some may say even tampered with, to remove the most damning incidents (sometimes in very obvious edits),” the uploader writes, “there is still enough material to paint the picture of what really happened in Zuccotti park once the media cameras have left.”
The footage shows helmeted NYPD officers making arrests, some sort of device discharging a large amount of smoke in front of an officer, and officers wielding a saw to cut into metal that is securing a protester to a tree (some protesters used bike locks to prevent themselves from being removed from the park).
An email to the NYPD’s top press spokesman, Paul Browne, has not been returned. Previously, very little footage of the November 15th raid existed because the NYPD forced media away from Zuccotti Park. Footage of the mass arrests during the Brooklyn Bridge action taken by the department’s Tactical Assistance Response Unit was released as evidence in the subsequent trials against the demonstrators.
[UPDATE] As some keen reporters have noted, there’s a good chance this video wasn’t “leaked” by Anonymous, but rather turned over by the City during the discovery phases in the cases of individual protesters who were arrested during the raid. “I can confirm that TARU video and other video arising from the November 15th eviction was turned over to defense attorneys,” says Gideon Oliver, the president of the National Lawyers Guild—New York Chapter. “That happened some time ago.” The NLG is representing some protesters who were arrested in the raid. Oliver adds that none of the cases have gone to trial yet.

anarcho-queer:

Updated: Anonymous Leaks NYPD Footage Of Occupy’s Eviction From Zuccotti Park

Anonymous has leaked what they claim to be “hours” of footage of last year’s raid on Zuccotti Park shot by the NYPD from 14 different cameras. A short montage of the footage has been compiled together for a YouTube video, but the file available for download is 11 GB. “While it’s clear that a lot of this police footage is incomplete and has been edited, some may say even tampered with, to remove the most damning incidents (sometimes in very obvious edits),the uploader writes, “there is still enough material to paint the picture of what really happened in Zuccotti park once the media cameras have left.

The footage shows helmeted NYPD officers making arrests, some sort of device discharging a large amount of smoke in front of an officer, and officers wielding a saw to cut into metal that is securing a protester to a tree (some protesters used bike locks to prevent themselves from being removed from the park).

An email to the NYPD’s top press spokesman, Paul Browne, has not been returned. Previously, very little footage of the November 15th raid existed because the NYPD forced media away from Zuccotti Park. Footage of the mass arrests during the Brooklyn Bridge action taken by the department’s Tactical Assistance Response Unit was released as evidence in the subsequent trials against the demonstrators.

[UPDATE] As some keen reporters have noted, there’s a good chance this video wasn’t “leaked” by Anonymous, but rather turned over by the City during the discovery phases in the cases of individual protesters who were arrested during the raid. “I can confirm that TARU video and other video arising from the November 15th eviction was turned over to defense attorneys,” says Gideon Oliver, the president of the National Lawyers Guild—New York Chapter. “That happened some time ago.” The NLG is representing some protesters who were arrested in the raid. Oliver adds that none of the cases have gone to trial yet.

Mural Critical of the NYPD Buffed by the NYPD

By Bucky Turco of Animal NYC!
In a new 132-page report — Suppressing Protest: Human Rights Violations in the U.S. Response to Occupy Wall Street — members of a national consortium of law school clinics, lawyers, law professors and other legal experts “catalog 130 specific alleged incidents of excessive police force, and hundreds of additional violations, including unjustified arrests, abuse of journalists, unlawful closure of sidewalks and parks to protesters, and pervasive surveillance of peaceful activists” in New York City.  The experts note that, to date, only one police officer is known to have been disciplined for misconduct related to Occupy Wall Street protests in NYC.  Read the full report here.

In a new 132-page report — Suppressing Protest: Human Rights Violations in the U.S. Response to Occupy Wall Street — members of a national consortium of law school clinics, lawyers, law professors and other legal experts “catalog 130 specific alleged incidents of excessive police force, and hundreds of additional violations, including unjustified arrests, abuse of journalists, unlawful closure of sidewalks and parks to protesters, and pervasive surveillance of peaceful activists” in New York City.  The experts note that, to date, only one police officer is known to have been disciplined for misconduct related to Occupy Wall Street protests in NYC.  Read the full report here.

As someone who has covered the NYPD on occasion, I can attest to the department’s near-constant invocation, since 9/11/2001, of terrorism to justify any action — no matter how ridiculous.
Now, Propublica’s intrepid investigative reporter Justin Elliott discovers that the NYPD has been “overstating” its counterterrorism record.  Elliott writes:
"the department, its allies and the media have repeatedly said the department has thwarted or helped thwart 14 terrorist plots against New York since Sept 11…
Is it true?
In a word, no.”
Read the whole story at ProPublica

As someone who has covered the NYPD on occasion, I can attest to the department’s near-constant invocation, since 9/11/2001, of terrorism to justify any action — no matter how ridiculous.

Now, Propublica’s intrepid investigative reporter Justin Elliott discovers that the NYPD has been “overstating” its counterterrorism record.  Elliott writes:

"the department, its allies and the media have repeatedly said the department has thwarted or helped thwart 14 terrorist plots against New York since Sept 11…

Is it true?

In a word, no.”

Read the whole story at ProPublica

Peter Hart of FAIR (Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting) dismantles an NYPD press release, er I mean article from the current issue of Newsweek, where, he writes, “one can find another embarrassing tribute to.. New York Police Department Commissioner Ray Kelly.”  He continues: “Kelly is the ‘pugnacious police commissioner’ who ‘looks bulldog-tough even in bespoke suits.’ And consider his terror-fighting skills:

Since he took over as police commissioner in the aftermath of 9/11, Kelly’s most critical mission has been to thwart all terrorist threats against the city, and he’s aimed to do that, in some cases, even before a plot is entirely clear to the plotters themselves.

That’s right—he’s busting plots that even the plotters themselves don’t know they’re plotting.”  Read the rest here: Newsweek: In Praise of Ray Kelly, Crime-Fighting Superhero

Peter Hart of FAIR (Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting) dismantles an NYPD press release, er I mean article from the current issue of Newsweek, where, he writes, “one can find another embarrassing tribute to.. New York Police Department Commissioner Ray Kelly.”  He continues: “Kelly is the ‘pugnacious police commissioner’ who ‘looks bulldog-tough even in bespoke suits.’ And consider his terror-fighting skills:

Since he took over as police commissioner in the aftermath of 9/11, Kelly’s most critical mission has been to thwart all terrorist threats against the city, and he’s aimed to do that, in some cases, even before a plot is entirely clear to the plotters themselves.

That’s right—he’s busting plots that even the plotters themselves don’t know they’re plotting.”  Read the rest here: Newsweek: In Praise of Ray Kelly, Crime-Fighting Superhero

wnyc:

Timeline | The City’s Use of Stop-And-FriskWNYC created an interactive look back at the start of the policy, the legal challenges it has faced, as well as how the numbers have increased over time.

wnyc:

Timeline | The City’s Use of Stop-And-Frisk
WNYC created an interactive look back at the start of the policy, the legal challenges it has faced, as well as how the numbers have increased over time.

newsweek:

futurejournalismproject:

NY Police Restrict Press Access say News Orgs
Twelve news organizations joined the New York Times in criticizing the New York Police Department for its treatment of journalists covering the Occupy Wall Street Movement and other newsworthy events.
In a joint letter Wednesday they write (PDF):

There have been other reports of police officers using a variety of tactics ranging from inappropriate orders directed at some journalists to physical interference with others, who were covering newsworthy sites and events. Indeed, as recently as this Monday it was reported (attached) that at another OWS demonstration, police “officers blocked the lens of a newspaper photographer attempting to document the arrests.” As a result, a number of press entities feel that more needs to be done if we are to resolve these issues in an amicable manner.

According to The Atlantic Wire:
The police’s interference with the press extends past Occupy protests, the organizations say. An inspector threatened New York Daily News photographer David Handschuh at last year’s Macy’s Day parade, the National Press Photographers Association writes, and another Daily News reporter had his press credentials pulled while covering a fire in December, Capital New York reported.
In response, Deputy Commissioner Paul Brown told The Atlantic Wire that 1,600 new officers have received media training with an emphasis on 1st Amendment Protections.
Image: Co-signatures of a New York Times letter to the the NYPD. Via Capital New York (PDF).

nwk tumblr co-signs.

newsweek:

futurejournalismproject:

NY Police Restrict Press Access say News Orgs

Twelve news organizations joined the New York Times in criticizing the New York Police Department for its treatment of journalists covering the Occupy Wall Street Movement and other newsworthy events.

In a joint letter Wednesday they write (PDF):

There have been other reports of police officers using a variety of tactics ranging from inappropriate orders directed at some journalists to physical interference with others, who were covering newsworthy sites and events. Indeed, as recently as this Monday it was reported (attached) that at another OWS demonstration, police “officers blocked the lens of a newspaper photographer attempting to document the arrests.” As a result, a number of press entities feel that more needs to be done if we are to resolve these issues in an amicable manner.

According to The Atlantic Wire:

The police’s interference with the press extends past Occupy protests, the organizations say. An inspector threatened New York Daily News photographer David Handschuh at last year’s Macy’s Day parade, the National Press Photographers Association writes, and another Daily News reporter had his press credentials pulled while covering a fire in December, Capital New York reported.

In response, Deputy Commissioner Paul Brown told The Atlantic Wire that 1,600 new officers have received media training with an emphasis on 1st Amendment Protections.

Image: Co-signatures of a New York Times letter to the the NYPD. Via Capital New York (PDF).

nwk tumblr co-signs.

Woman Arrested for Speaking in Grand Central Terminal

On January 3, 2012, NYPD officers arrested a woman for, it seems, using the “people’s mic” tactic to inform the public about the National Defense Authorization Act.  The Daily News provides sparse coverage here.

shortformblog:

manicchill:

OWS Invests In Unmanned Surveillance Drone Dubbed The ‘Occucopter’

For years we’ve seen images of the military’s unmanned aerial vehicles aiding soldiers in combat zones, and their evolution from surveillance tools to the heavily weaponized Predator drones. Now, the Guardian reports, Occupy Wall Street livestreamer Tim Pool hopes to use that technology as an additional set of eyes on the police department.

Tim Pool, an Occupy Wall Street protester, has acquired a Parrot AR drone he amusingly calls the “occucopter”. It is a lightweight four-rotor helicopter that you can buy cheaply on Amazon and control with your iPhone. It has an onboard camera so that you can view everything on your phone that it points at. Pool has modified the software to stream live video to the internet so that we can watch the action as it unfolds. [more]

(images courtesy of Time/iPhoneZA/GeekAlerts)

Wow, Occupy just stepped up its game. Be sure to read Manic, Chill’s full piece.