Nick Turse

newyorker:

As we near the end of another year marked by the revolutions that continue to roil the Middle East, punctuated at this year-end with the recent conflagration in Gaza, Magnum has published “Magnum Revolution: 65 Years of Fighting for Freedom,” a collection of some of the most powerful photographs of the convulsions of conflict by the agency’s renowned photographers.  Click-through for a selection.

theatlantic:

Syria’s Spray-Can Revolution

Seeing Syria’s children as passive victims of a tyrannical regime, however, underestimates their role in the revolt. If they’ve been victims, they’ve also been protagonists. Think back to how all this began. In March 2011, 10 Syrians between the ages of 9 and 15, inspired by the rebellions in Egypt and Tunisia, daubed The people want to topple the regime! on the walls of a school building in the neglected provincial city of Dara’a. The vicious reaction of the secret police, or mukhabarat — they arrested and, by some accounts, tortured the children — led to popular demonstrations; from these spiraled everything else. This isn’t been a samizdat revolution, sparked by epistles from dissident intellectuals. It was started by the spray cans of schoolchildren, and by other young people who then turned to Facebook and YouTube to get the message out.

Read more. [Image: Amr Dalsh/Reuters]

theatlantic:

Syria’s Spray-Can Revolution

Seeing Syria’s children as passive victims of a tyrannical regime, however, underestimates their role in the revolt. If they’ve been victims, they’ve also been protagonists. Think back to how all this began. In March 2011, 10 Syrians between the ages of 9 and 15, inspired by the rebellions in Egypt and Tunisia, daubed The people want to topple the regime! on the walls of a school building in the neglected provincial city of Dara’a. The vicious reaction of the secret police, or mukhabarat — they arrested and, by some accounts, tortured the children — led to popular demonstrations; from these spiraled everything else. This isn’t been a samizdat revolution, sparked by epistles from dissident intellectuals. It was started by the spray cans of schoolchildren, and by other young people who then turned to Facebook and YouTube to get the message out.

Read more. [Image: Amr Dalsh/Reuters]

“I’ll tweet that I am here in Budaiya Road, and there are no checkpoints in the area, but there are lots of riot police.” A new tweet came through before Jihan could finish composing hers. She scanned it quickly as she skillfully guided her car around a traffic circle. “Okay. The attack started,” she said. “It’s just at the next roundabout. We might be able to see it from the car.” Jihan rolled down the window. “Can you smell the tear gas?” she asked, began coughing, and immediately rolled her window up again.

Jihan and I peeled away in a friend’s jeep, looking out the back window as arcs of light from tear gas canisters and burning Molotovs streaked across the night sky.

We thought we saw a tear gas canister hit a fleeing child in the head, and when Jihan received a phone call about the injury soon afterwards, we rushed to the underground clinic.

Jihan and I had been to the protest and, at its end, were speaking to bare-chested youths holding Molotov cocktails, their faces wrapped in t-shirts. “This [Molotov] is not violence,” one of them insisted. “What’s violence is what they use against us, live bullets. We are defending ourselves. We’re not attacking. If they attack us, we respond.”

As we continued our drive, grey clouds of tear gas billowed up from village after village, Jihan constantly checking her Twitter feed and rattling off the names of areas currently under assault: “A protest in Dair has been attacked and in Tashan as well. A’ali, also the same. Now they are attacking the women in the north of Bilad.”

New tweets buzzed. “Lots of injuries, actually, a woman has been injured, I’ll show you the picture…” She turned her phone my way, allowing me to glimpse a photograph of a bloody limb.

Jihan Kazerooni and I drove past scores of armed riot police on Budaiya highway as her iPhone buzzed non-stop: phone calls, Skype calls and, incessantly, Twitter. I had wondered what the phrase “Twitter revolution” really meant when I heard it used in connection with Iran in 2009 and Egypt in 2011. Here, in the small Gulf Kingdom of Bahrain, I was beginning to grasp the concept.

I was in that country for three weeks as a part of the Witness Bahrain initiative, a group of internationals seeking to document and expose human rights abuses perpetrated by the regime against protesters and activists.

nickturse:

22 Journalists Killed in Syria

At least 18 journalists have been killed in work-related incidents in Syria during late 2011 and 2012.  Four additional deaths are currently under investigation by the Committee to Protect Journalists.  For more on these heroic women and men, see CPJ’s website.

Mika Yamamoto, Japan Press
August 20, 2012, in Aleppo, Syria

Ali Abbas, SANA
August 11, 2012, in Damascus, Syria

Hatem Abu Yehia, Al-Ikhbariya
August 10, 2012, in Al-Tal, Syria

Mohammad Shamma, Al-Ikhbariya
June 27, 2012, in Doursha, Syria

Sami Abu Amin, Al-Ikhbariya
June 27, 2012, in Doursha, Syria

Ahmed al-Assam, Freelance
May 28, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Bassel al-Shahade, Freelance
May 28, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Ahmed Adnan al-Ashlaq, Shaam News Network
May 27, 2012, in Damascus, Syria

Lawrence Fahmy al-Naimi, Shaam News Network
May 27, 2012, in Damascus, Syria

Ammar Mohamed Suhail Zado, Shaam News Network
May 27, 2012, in Damascus, Syria

Anas al-Tarsha, Freelance
February 24, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Rémi Ochlik, Freelance
February 22, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Marie Colvin, Sunday Times
February 22, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Rami al-Sayed, Freelance
February 21, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Mazhar Tayyara, Freelance
February 4, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Gilles Jacquier, France 2
January 11, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Basil al-Sayed, Freelance
December 27, 2011, in Homs, Syria

Ferzat Jarban, Freelance
November 19 or 20, 2011, in Al-Qasir, Syria

Bara’a Yusuf al-Bushi, Freelance
August 11, 2012, in Al Tal, Syria

Falah Taha, Freelance
July 14, 2012, in or near Damascus, Syria

Ali Juburi al-Kaabi, Al-Zawraa
July 14, 2012, in Jaramana, Syria

Shukri Abu al-Burghul, Al-Thawra and Radio Damascus
January 3, 2012, in Damascus, Syria

thepeoplesrecord:

Clashes have broken out as tens of thousands of students and their supporters demanded improvements to Chile’s public education system in the streets of Santiago on August 28. Police used tear gas and water cannons to disperse the most radical protesters.

thepeoplesrecord:

Clashes have broken out as tens of thousands of students and their supporters demanded improvements to Chile’s public education system in the streets of Santiago on August 28. Police used tear gas and water cannons to disperse the most radical protesters.

22 Journalists Killed in Syria


At least 18 journalists have been killed in work-related incidents in Syria during late 2011 and 2012.  Four additional deaths are currently under investigation by the Committee to Protect Journalists.  For more on these heroic women and men, see CPJ’s website.

Mika Yamamoto, Japan Press
August 20, 2012, in Aleppo, Syria

Ali Abbas, SANA
August 11, 2012, in Damascus, Syria

Hatem Abu Yehia, Al-Ikhbariya
August 10, 2012, in Al-Tal, Syria

Mohammad Shamma, Al-Ikhbariya
June 27, 2012, in Doursha, Syria

Sami Abu Amin, Al-Ikhbariya
June 27, 2012, in Doursha, Syria

Ahmed al-Assam, Freelance
May 28, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Bassel al-Shahade, Freelance
May 28, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Ahmed Adnan al-Ashlaq, Shaam News Network
May 27, 2012, in Damascus, Syria

Lawrence Fahmy al-Naimi, Shaam News Network
May 27, 2012, in Damascus, Syria

Ammar Mohamed Suhail Zado, Shaam News Network
May 27, 2012, in Damascus, Syria

Anas al-Tarsha, Freelance
February 24, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Rémi Ochlik, Freelance
February 22, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Marie Colvin, Sunday Times
February 22, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Rami al-Sayed, Freelance
February 21, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Mazhar Tayyara, Freelance
February 4, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Gilles Jacquier, France 2
January 11, 2012, in Homs, Syria

Basil al-Sayed, Freelance
December 27, 2011, in Homs, Syria

Ferzat Jarban, Freelance
November 19 or 20, 2011, in Al-Qasir, Syria

Bara’a Yusuf al-Bushi, Freelance
August 11, 2012, in Al Tal, Syria

Falah Taha, Freelance
July 14, 2012, in or near Damascus, Syria

Ali Juburi al-Kaabi, Al-Zawraa
July 14, 2012, in Jaramana, Syria

Shukri Abu al-Burghul, Al-Thawra and Radio Damascus
January 3, 2012, in Damascus, Syria