Nick Turse
How Disaster Aid Recipients Voted on Sandy Relief 


By Al Shaw and Jeff Larson, ProPublica, Updated February 1, 2013
"Late Tuesday evening, President Obama signed the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013, which allocates $50.7 billion for Hurricane Sandy aid. Though the measure passed both the Senate and the House, many members of Congress voted no despite their own states receiving millions of dollars in federal disaster assistance in 2012.”

How Disaster Aid Recipients Voted on Sandy Relief

"Late Tuesday evening, President Obama signed the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013, which allocates $50.7 billion for Hurricane Sandy aid. Though the measure passed both the Senate and the House, many members of Congress voted no despite their own states receiving millions of dollars in federal disaster assistance in 2012.

penamerican:

Many writers were hard hit by Hurricane Sandy. We want to let you know how PEN can help. If you know a writer in need of assistance, please encourage them to apply to the PEN Writers’ Emergency Fund. In response to Hurricane Sandy, the Writers’ Fund Committee has set aside funds for…

lareviewofbooks:


A time before the city — and the nagging potential for destruction — is almost harder to imagine than a time after it. There have been attempts to resurrect in words the meadows of Harlem or waterways of Canal Street, linking them to a future long after the city is gone (I’m thinking here of books like Eric Sanderson’s beautiful Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City). But Sandy was more convincing than any book. The surge revealed the potential for pre-history’s return — flooding those parts of the city made by man, the filled up places like Battery Park City or the pestilential swamp surrounding the Gowanus Canal.

LARB’s latest dispatch from the Anthropocene: Environmental reporter David Biello reflects on our Armageddon fantasies in the wake of Super Storm Sandy, from his home near the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, NY. Authors mentioned in this essay: Walt Whitman, Eric Sanderson, Don DeLillo, Colson Whitehead and God.

lareviewofbooks:

A time before the city — and the nagging potential for destruction — is almost harder to imagine than a time after it. There have been attempts to resurrect in words the meadows of Harlem or waterways of Canal Street, linking them to a future long after the city is gone (I’m thinking here of books like Eric Sanderson’s beautiful Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City). But Sandy was more convincing than any book. The surge revealed the potential for pre-history’s return — flooding those parts of the city made by man, the filled up places like Battery Park City or the pestilential swamp surrounding the Gowanus Canal.

LARB’s latest dispatch from the Anthropocene: Environmental reporter David Biello reflects on our Armageddon fantasies in the wake of Super Storm Sandy, from his home near the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, NY. Authors mentioned in this essay: Walt Whitman, Eric Sanderson, Don DeLillo, Colson Whitehead and God.

I called my mother that Sunday, when the reports of the hurricane started coming in, splashing hysteria across twitter. I said, “Maybe it’s going to be like the blackout when you were here in 1977.” She laughed at me. “Go outside and stand in the middle of the hurricane when it hits. That’s what New York was like in the 1970s. Not during a disaster. Not during the blackout. Like, on a Tuesday afternoon.”

Here Is New York - The Rumpus.net

It’s a dangerous proposition for a writer to appropriate another author’s title — especially a famous one — so when I saw this piece under the moniker of  E. B. White’s 1949 essay, “Here is New York,” I gave it the crook eye.  No need.  This rumination on New York City by Helena Fitzgerald does it justice.  Definitely worth reading.  

inothernews:

When superstorm Sandy struck Fire Island off of Long Island’s south shore, it washed away more than 70 feet of a sand dune, revealing a shipwreck thought to be a cargo ship that dates back to just after the Civil War — or possibly a Canadian schooner that was lost in the 1920’s.  (Photo: US Coast Guard via The New York Daily News)

inothernews:

When superstorm Sandy struck Fire Island off of Long Island’s south shore, it washed away more than 70 feet of a sand dune, revealing a shipwreck thought to be a cargo ship that dates back to just after the Civil War — or possibly a Canadian schooner that was lost in the 1920’s.  (Photo: US Coast Guard via The New York Daily News)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.) 
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.


Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

Hurricane Sandy Storm Damage as seen by New Jersey Transit

Photo credit:  NJ_TRANSIT (All rights Reserved)

"I took an iPhone photo literally in my bathrobe, and within a couple of hours, it had been viewed thousands, hundreds of thousands of times."— Nick Cope
"Of the hundreds of photos that went viral as hurricane Sandy struck the east coast, Nick Cope’s was one of the first. On Monday morning, he looked out the window of his loft in Red Hook, a Brooklyn waterfront neighborhood that sits in the mouth of New York Harbor, and took a photo of the flood waters that had already risen in the streets. He posted it to Facebook and Twitter, and continued on with his day, making preparations for the coming storm. After a strong initial response from his 1,345 Facebook friends, the photo was noticed by a local TV producer. Soon enough, Cope had editors from some of the world’s largest media outlets on the phone, wanting to use his photo.” 
(from The Story Behind Hurricane Sandy’s First Viral Photo | American Photo)

"I took an iPhone photo literally in my bathrobe, and within a couple of hours, it had been viewed thousands, hundreds of thousands of times."— Nick Cope

"Of the hundreds of photos that went viral as hurricane Sandy struck the east coast, Nick Cope’s was one of the first. On Monday morning, he looked out the window of his loft in Red Hook, a Brooklyn waterfront neighborhood that sits in the mouth of New York Harbor, and took a photo of the flood waters that had already risen in the streets. He posted it to Facebook and Twitter, and continued on with his day, making preparations for the coming storm. After a strong initial response from his 1,345 Facebook friends, the photo was noticed by a local TV producer. Soon enough, Cope had editors from some of the world’s largest media outlets on the phone, wanting to use his photo.”

(from The Story Behind Hurricane Sandy’s First Viral Photo | American Photo)