Nick Turse

storyboard:

Wall Dogs: The Midair Muralists Who Paint New York

It’s 8am in Soho, the thermometer reads just above freezing, and the sky is bleak. Taxis splash down the streets; New Yorkers stride with their heads down, leaping over puddles, carelessly bumping into each other. Everyone wants to get out of the cold, out of the rain, into the warmth.

Ten stories above — on a long, skinny platform hanging from the facade of a building at Canal and Mercer in downtown Manhattan — it’s a different story. Climbers’ ropes secured around their torsos, Jason Coatney and Armando Balmaceda stand in a melange of open paint cans and brushes. These two muralists of Colossal Media, the largest hand-painted advertising company in America, are heavily layered in sweatshirts and raincoats. But in this industry, c’est la vie. Paintbrushes in their fingerless-gloved hands, earbuds in their ears — “I like to start out with Miles Davis in the morning,” Coatney smiles, his breath visible in the frigid air — they begin yet another workday in the sky.

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storyboard:

Muhammad Ali Goes to Mars: The Lost Interview

It was in the summer of 1966 when a star-struck 17-year-old set out to interview his idol: Muhammad Ali. Twenty miles from the South Side of Chicago, in Glencoe, Ill., Michael Aisner was calling repeatedly to the gym where the boxing champ was training. Finally, a man named Mr. Shabazz — Jeremiah Shabazz, perhaps? The man who introduced Ali to Islam? — picked up.

“Where are you from?” Shabazz asked the boy.

“I’m from WNTH, a high school radio station,” Aisner said.

“The champ doesn’t have time to talk,” he told him.

Aisner called back two days later. And then two days after that.

“Can I interview the champ?” he asked again.

Finally, Shabazz relented.

“Ok,” he said. “The champ will meet you.”

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tea-and-misanthropy:

thedailywhat:

Posted Without Comment of the Day: [brooklynmutt]

it isn’t like this is a new video or anything, but god, it still makes me feel so uncomfortable to watch. mitt romney is so smarmy from the get-go, making a big deal about sitting down to talk with a vietnam war veteran and then immediately launching into talking about himself and his own life before actually letting the man talk. and that’s before he even gets to all the marriage bigotry talk. gross.

thirteenny:

In this 1968 interview produced for THIRTEEN, Muhammad Ali discusses his boxing career, opposition to the Vietnam War, and commitment to the Nation of Islam.

THIRTEEN, the flagship station of PBS, turns 50 this year. Explore our archive and be a part of the effort to keep THIRTEEN going strong: http://www.thirteen.org/thirteen-fifty-years/ 

Timelapse Video of a Massive Wall Drawing at the Brooklyn Museum

Watch two days of meticulous drawing by Santi Moix sped up to less than two minutes.

Timelapse Video of a Massive Wall Drawing at the Brooklyn Museum

Watch two days of meticulous drawing by Santi Moix sped up to less than two minutes.

Timelapse Video of a Massive Wall Drawing at the Brooklyn Museum

Watch two days of meticulous drawing by Santi Moix sped up to less than two minutes.

theatlantic:

A Tilt-Shift Video of Rio de Janeiro’s Carnival

“I wanted to look my best for Rio,” wrote the famous Italian aviator Francesco de Pinedo in his travelogues, “There she lay, fragrant and colorful, voluptuously reclining beside the sea.” Le Corbusier echoed similar gendered reflections of the city when he likened Rio de Janiero’s “dancing” landscape of lush islands and sculpted peaks to the bodies of women. What prompted these “poetic” formulations was the bird’s eye spectacle newly afforded by the airplane, which offered privileged encounters with the city inaccessible to all but the brave and daring. Even with the introduction and integration of Google Maps into contemporary culture, these same encounters remain exclusive to experience of flight, in the sense that the airplane is the only medium in which one may truly inhabit the oblique.

Read more. [Video: Jarbas Agnelli]