Nick Turse
Between 2007 and 2012, six patients accused an employee at California’s Porterville Developmental Center – an institution which houses 425 men and women with cerebral palsy, mental retardation and other disorders — of violence, including rape, choking and battery.  He has never faced criminal charges.
(via Beating at developmental center goes unpunished after years of delays | The Center for Investigative Reporting)

Between 2007 and 2012, six patients accused an employee at California’s Porterville Developmental Center – an institution which houses 425 men and women with cerebral palsy, mental retardation and other disorders — of violence, including rape, choking and battery.  He has never faced criminal charges.

(via Beating at developmental center goes unpunished after years of delays | The Center for Investigative Reporting)

newyorker:

Women and Violence in El Salvador, a slide show: http://nyr.kr/Q8mN46

BBC News - Delhi gang-rape victim dies in hospital in Singapore
"She had suffered from severe organ failure following serious injuries to her body and brain. She was courageous in fighting for her life for so long against the odds but the trauma to her body was too severe for her to overcome," a statement released by Mount Elizabeth Hospital chief executive Kelvin Loh said.

BBC News - Delhi gang-rape victim dies in hospital in Singapore

"She had suffered from severe organ failure following serious injuries to her body and brain. She was courageous in fighting for her life for so long against the odds but the trauma to her body was too severe for her to overcome," a statement released by Mount Elizabeth Hospital chief executive Kelvin Loh said.

gettyimages:

Protesters Demonstrate Against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi
An Egyptian protester picks up a live tear gas round fired by riot police during demonstrations against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi near Tahrir Square on November 28, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt.
Demonstrations have been held after a week of tension and violent protest in response to Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi having awarded himself new constitutional powers, which many believe have been pushed through by the Muslim Brotherhood without inclusive consultation with other members of Egypt’s cabinet and political leadership.
Photo by Ed Giles/Getty Images

gettyimages:

Protesters Demonstrate Against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi

An Egyptian protester picks up a live tear gas round fired by riot police during demonstrations against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi near Tahrir Square on November 28, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt.

Demonstrations have been held after a week of tension and violent protest in response to Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi having awarded himself new constitutional powers, which many believe have been pushed through by the Muslim Brotherhood without inclusive consultation with other members of Egypt’s cabinet and political leadership.

Photo by Ed Giles/Getty Images

"Human rights activists in Brazil mobilised Wednesday to draw attention to the fact that half a million people have been murdered in this South American country in the past 10 years,” writes Fabiola Ortiz of Inter Press Service.
"On Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, 500,000 beans were scattered on the national flag and on 40-metre-long strips of red carpet, in a protest organised by the local NGO Rio de Paz.
"Hundreds of passersby stopped to gaze at the symbolic rivers of blood, which ran up to a wooden cross and a sign reading: ‘Brazil: half a million murders in 10 years. SHAME.’”

"Human rights activists in Brazil mobilised Wednesday to draw attention to the fact that half a million people have been murdered in this South American country in the past 10 years,” writes

"On Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, 500,000 beans were scattered on the national flag and on 40-metre-long strips of red carpet, in a protest organised by the local NGO Rio de Paz.

"Hundreds of passersby stopped to gaze at the symbolic rivers of blood, which ran up to a wooden cross and a sign reading: ‘Brazil: half a million murders in 10 years. SHAME.’”

Cities with more than 500,000 inhabitants account for over 70% of homicides in Costa Rica, 68% in Guatemala, and 63% in El Salvador.

Crimes may be more likely to be reported in urban areas, skewing the statistics. In a study in Kenya, for example, urban inhabitants were more likely to report crimes than their rural counterparts.

In many countries, urban areas have a higher rate of violence using firearms. Fifty metropolitan areas surveyed in a recent U.S. study, representing 54% of the national population, accounted for 67% of firearms homicides.

While the size of cities does not appear to have a direct correlation with violent crime rates, a high rate of urbanization often correlates with greater violence.

Other factors that can exacerbate urban armed violence include: rates of unemployment; high proportions of youth; low levels of education; poor urban design; proliferation of firearms; and high density of informal settlements.

Key findings from Urban Armed Violence, a new report by the Small Arms Survey and the Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence and Development.
theatlantic:

Syria’s Spray-Can Revolution

Seeing Syria’s children as passive victims of a tyrannical regime, however, underestimates their role in the revolt. If they’ve been victims, they’ve also been protagonists. Think back to how all this began. In March 2011, 10 Syrians between the ages of 9 and 15, inspired by the rebellions in Egypt and Tunisia, daubed The people want to topple the regime! on the walls of a school building in the neglected provincial city of Dara’a. The vicious reaction of the secret police, or mukhabarat — they arrested and, by some accounts, tortured the children — led to popular demonstrations; from these spiraled everything else. This isn’t been a samizdat revolution, sparked by epistles from dissident intellectuals. It was started by the spray cans of schoolchildren, and by other young people who then turned to Facebook and YouTube to get the message out.

Read more. [Image: Amr Dalsh/Reuters]

theatlantic:

Syria’s Spray-Can Revolution

Seeing Syria’s children as passive victims of a tyrannical regime, however, underestimates their role in the revolt. If they’ve been victims, they’ve also been protagonists. Think back to how all this began. In March 2011, 10 Syrians between the ages of 9 and 15, inspired by the rebellions in Egypt and Tunisia, daubed The people want to topple the regime! on the walls of a school building in the neglected provincial city of Dara’a. The vicious reaction of the secret police, or mukhabarat — they arrested and, by some accounts, tortured the children — led to popular demonstrations; from these spiraled everything else. This isn’t been a samizdat revolution, sparked by epistles from dissident intellectuals. It was started by the spray cans of schoolchildren, and by other young people who then turned to Facebook and YouTube to get the message out.

Read more. [Image: Amr Dalsh/Reuters]

theatlantic:

The Places Where America’s Drones Are Striking, Now on Instagram

Technology has countervailing effects. We can send a battle by air to a land we have never set foot in, laying previously unimaginable distance between us and our wars. But at the same time we can see on a device in our pocket a satellite picture of these places so remote. Maybe, Bridle writes, the instant connectivity of our world can be a platform not just for faster information, but for deeper empathy for people who live a world away.

See more. [Images: Dronestagram]

crisisgroup:

Two killed in Bahrain ‘terrorist’ explosions, authorities say | Los Angeles Times
By Emily Alpert
Two foreigners were killed and a third injured when a series of explosions rocked Bahrain, government officials said Monday, a new eruption of violence that authorities labeled as terrorist acts bent on destabilizing the divided country.
The three men, all Asians, were victims of homemade bombs, one man dying after kicking a device and another killed near a movie theater, Bahraini police told state media.
The third man, a cleaner, was reported to be in serious condition. Like many Gulf countries, Bahrain brings in a large number of foreign laborers from Asia, including many workers from Pakistan and elsewhere in South Asia.
FULL ARTICLE (Los Angeles Times)
Photo: Zeep van der Kist/Flickr

crisisgroup:

Two killed in Bahrain ‘terrorist’ explosions, authorities say | Los Angeles Times

By Emily Alpert

Two foreigners were killed and a third injured when a series of explosions rocked Bahrain, government officials said Monday, a new eruption of violence that authorities labeled as terrorist acts bent on destabilizing the divided country.

The three men, all Asians, were victims of homemade bombs, one man dying after kicking a device and another killed near a movie theater, Bahraini police told state media.

The third man, a cleaner, was reported to be in serious condition. Like many Gulf countries, Bahrain brings in a large number of foreign laborers from Asia, including many workers from Pakistan and elsewhere in South Asia.

FULL ARTICLE (Los Angeles Times)

Photo: Zeep van der Kist/Flickr

civiliansuffering:

Some of the 648 Journalists murdered since 1992

Beats Covered by Victims *

5% Business

29% Corruption

20% Crime

9% Culture

15% Human Rights

45% Politics

2% Sports

23% War

(* May add up to more than 100 percent because more than one category applies in some cases.)

For more, on these heroic women and men, see Committee to Protect Journalists’ website.