Nick Turse

pulitzercenter:

Protesters’ objections to the Bahrain’s government have grown to include the presence of the U.S., which bases a naval fleet on the island nation. Pulitzer Center grantee Reese Erlich writes about the tensions here.

“We want them to leave because the U.S. supports the dictatorship,” [a…

Should the US continue its trade agreement with Bahrain?

pulitzercenter:

Allegations of labor and human rights abuses since the 2011 uprising continue. Read more from Pulitzer Center grantee Reese Erlich here, and comment below.

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.) 
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.


Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

crisisgroup:

Two killed in Bahrain ‘terrorist’ explosions, authorities say | Los Angeles Times
By Emily Alpert
Two foreigners were killed and a third injured when a series of explosions rocked Bahrain, government officials said Monday, a new eruption of violence that authorities labeled as terrorist acts bent on destabilizing the divided country.
The three men, all Asians, were victims of homemade bombs, one man dying after kicking a device and another killed near a movie theater, Bahraini police told state media.
The third man, a cleaner, was reported to be in serious condition. Like many Gulf countries, Bahrain brings in a large number of foreign laborers from Asia, including many workers from Pakistan and elsewhere in South Asia.
FULL ARTICLE (Los Angeles Times)
Photo: Zeep van der Kist/Flickr

crisisgroup:

Two killed in Bahrain ‘terrorist’ explosions, authorities say | Los Angeles Times

By Emily Alpert

Two foreigners were killed and a third injured when a series of explosions rocked Bahrain, government officials said Monday, a new eruption of violence that authorities labeled as terrorist acts bent on destabilizing the divided country.

The three men, all Asians, were victims of homemade bombs, one man dying after kicking a device and another killed near a movie theater, Bahraini police told state media.

The third man, a cleaner, was reported to be in serious condition. Like many Gulf countries, Bahrain brings in a large number of foreign laborers from Asia, including many workers from Pakistan and elsewhere in South Asia.

FULL ARTICLE (Los Angeles Times)

Photo: Zeep van der Kist/Flickr

fotojournalismus:

Anti government protesters shout slogans as they try to enter al-Eker village, south of Manama, October 22, 2012. Seven people have been detained over the killing of a policeman last week in al-Eker, which police has blocked off since Friday. Wefaq, the main opposition group in Bahrain, said on Sunday that clashes had broken out near al-Eker, south of Manama, after some rights activists and medics tried to enter the village.
[Credit : Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters]

fotojournalismus:

Anti government protesters shout slogans as they try to enter al-Eker village, south of Manama, October 22, 2012. Seven people have been detained over the killing of a policeman last week in al-Eker, which police has blocked off since Friday. Wefaq, the main opposition group in Bahrain, said on Sunday that clashes had broken out near al-Eker, south of Manama, after some rights activists and medics tried to enter the village.

[Credit : Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters]

“I’ll tweet that I am here in Budaiya Road, and there are no checkpoints in the area, but there are lots of riot police.” A new tweet came through before Jihan could finish composing hers. She scanned it quickly as she skillfully guided her car around a traffic circle. “Okay. The attack started,” she said. “It’s just at the next roundabout. We might be able to see it from the car.” Jihan rolled down the window. “Can you smell the tear gas?” she asked, began coughing, and immediately rolled her window up again.

Jihan and I peeled away in a friend’s jeep, looking out the back window as arcs of light from tear gas canisters and burning Molotovs streaked across the night sky.

We thought we saw a tear gas canister hit a fleeing child in the head, and when Jihan received a phone call about the injury soon afterwards, we rushed to the underground clinic.