Nick Turse
Congratulations to my good friend Ann Jones! Investigative reporter extraordinaire Jeremy Scahill (whose film Dirty Wars recently made the Oscar Short List in the documentary category) just picked her latest book, They Were Soldiers: How the Wounded Return from America’s Wars, as his number one book of 2013! 
If you don’t already have a copy, I urge you to pick one up.  It’s a beautifully written, devastatingly poignant piece of reportage, and an instant classic on the hidden reverberations of our distant wars.  But don’t take my word for it. Listen to Scahill: “My pick for the best book of 2013 comes from Ann Jones, who shows us a side of America’s wars that we often don’t see. She embeds with the doctors who spend their lives dealing with soldiers who are grievously wounded, psychologically scarred, or killed in combat. She talks to the families of troops who speak of their inability to recognize their sons and daughters, husbands and wives, or mothers and fathers because they have come home so transformed by their experiences in war. It’s a stunning portrait of the psychological and physical effects of war, with which we so rarely reckon. Jones, the daughter of a World War I veteran, brings a real understanding of the gap between the celebrations of our vets and the reality of how they are treated when they return. ‘America’s soldiers return with enough troubles to last the rest of their lives,’ she observes. She also questions the idea that war is inevitable. ‘War is not natural,’ she writes. ‘We have to be trained for it, soldiers and citizens alike. And the “wars of choice” we were trained for, the wars these soldiers took part in, need never have been fought.’”
(via PW’s Top 10 Authors Pick Their Favorite Books of 2013)

Congratulations to my good friend Ann Jones! Investigative reporter extraordinaire Jeremy Scahill (whose film Dirty Wars recently made the Oscar Short List in the documentary category) just picked her latest book, They Were SoldiersHow the Wounded Return from America’s Wars, as his number one book of 2013!

If you don’t already have a copy, I urge you to pick one up.  It’s a beautifully written, devastatingly poignant piece of reportage, and an instant classic on the hidden reverberations of our distant wars.  But don’t take my word for it. Listen to Scahill:

“My pick for the best book of 2013 comes from Ann Jones, who shows us a side of America’s wars that we often don’t see. She embeds with the doctors who spend their lives dealing with soldiers who are grievously wounded, psychologically scarred, or killed in combat. She talks to the families of troops who speak of their inability to recognize their sons and daughters, husbands and wives, or mothers and fathers because they have come home so transformed by their experiences in war. It’s a stunning portrait of the psychological and physical effects of war, with which we so rarely reckon. Jones, the daughter of a World War I veteran, brings a real understanding of the gap between the celebrations of our vets and the reality of how they are treated when they return. ‘America’s soldiers return with enough troubles to last the rest of their lives,’ she observes. She also questions the idea that war is inevitable. ‘War is not natural,’ she writes. ‘We have to be trained for it, soldiers and citizens alike. And the “wars of choice” we were trained for, the wars these soldiers took part in, need never have been fought.’”

(via PW’s Top 10 Authors Pick Their Favorite Books of 2013)

As a prelude to Veterans Day, here’s my (somewhat truncated) review of David Finkel’s Thank You for Your Service in the San Francisco Chronicle.
Finkel has given us an important book about the toll that the Iraq War took on Americans who served there, but we still await books written with the same depth, care, empathy and literary polish as Thank You for Your Service about Iraqi women killed at American checkpoints, Iraqi men killed by local militias, Iraqi boys killed by car bombs, desperate and homeless Iraqi girls forced into prostitution, Iraqi families chased from their neighborhoods - that is, all those people who didn’t travel halfway around the world to invade, occupy and sometimes kill, but nonetheless found themselves traumatized by the war.

As a prelude to Veterans Day, here’s my (somewhat truncated) review of David Finkel’s Thank You for Your Service in the San Francisco Chronicle.

Finkel has given us an important book about the toll that the Iraq War took on Americans who served there, but we still await books written with the same depth, care, empathy and literary polish as Thank You for Your Service about Iraqi women killed at American checkpoints, Iraqi men killed by local militias, Iraqi boys killed by car bombs, desperate and homeless Iraqi girls forced into prostitution, Iraqi families chased from their neighborhoods - that is, all those people who didn’t travel halfway around the world to invade, occupy and sometimes kill, but nonetheless found themselves traumatized by the war.


As a prelude to Veterans Day, here’s my (somewhat truncated) review of David Finkel’s Thank You for Your Service in the San Francisco Chronicle.
Finkel has given us an important book about the toll that the Iraq War took on Americans who served there, but we still await books written with the same depth, care, empathy and literary polish as Thank You for Your Service about Iraqi women killed at American checkpoints, Iraqi men killed by local militias, Iraqi boys killed by car bombs, desperate and homeless Iraqi girls forced into prostitution, Iraqi families chased from their neighborhoods - that is, all those people who didn’t travel halfway around the world to invade, occupy and sometimes kill, but nonetheless found themselves traumatized by the war.

As a prelude to Veterans Day, here’s my (somewhat truncated) review of David Finkel’s Thank You for Your Service in the San Francisco Chronicle.

Finkel has given us an important book about the toll that the Iraq War took on Americans who served there, but we still await books written with the same depth, care, empathy and literary polish as Thank You for Your Service about Iraqi women killed at American checkpoints, Iraqi men killed by local militias, Iraqi boys killed by car bombs, desperate and homeless Iraqi girls forced into prostitution, Iraqi families chased from their neighborhoods - that is, all those people who didn’t travel halfway around the world to invade, occupy and sometimes kill, but nonetheless found themselves traumatized by the war.

"I found myself tearing up, gagging at times, as I turned the pages." 
This generally isn’t what you like to read to begin a review of your book.  But I couldn’t be happier, more humbled, or more moved with the review of Kill Anything That Moves by wartime aid worker-turned-reporter Tom Fox in America magazine.  The piece is personal and poignant and concludes: “Kill Anything That Moves should become mandatory reading in all U.S. history classes and in classrooms where warfare is taught. But can we face the dark side of our military policies? Can we, as a nation, learn from the past? I am not optimistic. Reading this book and then passing it along could possibly pave the way. We owe this much to the ghosts of wars past and those to come.” 

"I found myself tearing up, gagging at times, as I turned the pages." 

This generally isn’t what you like to read to begin a review of your book.  But I couldn’t be happier, more humbled, or more moved with the review of Kill Anything That Moves by wartime aid worker-turned-reporter Tom Fox in America magazine.  The piece is personal and poignant and concludes: “Kill Anything That Moves should become mandatory reading in all U.S. history classes and in classrooms where warfare is taught. But can we face the dark side of our military policies? Can we, as a nation, learn from the past? I am not optimistic. Reading this book and then passing it along could possibly pave the way. We owe this much to the ghosts of wars past and those to come.” 

Nick Turse’s “Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam” is not only one of the most important books ever written about the Vietnam conflict but provides readers with an unflinching account of the nature of modern industrial warfare… Turse, finally, grasps that the trauma that plagues most combat veterans is a result not only of what they witnessed or endured, but what they did. This trauma, shame, guilt and self-revulsion push many combat veterans—whether from Vietnam, Iraq or Afghanistan—to escape into narcotic and alcoholic fogs or commit suicide. By the end of Turse’s book, you understand why.
BOOK REVIEW: Kill Anything That Moves’ - SFGate
I can’t help but share a glowing review of my new book from yesterday’s San Francisco Chronicle. Joel Whitney calls it an “indispensable new history” and continues: “Kill Anything That Moves is a paradigm-shifting, connect-the-dots history of American atrocities that reads like a thriller; it will convince those with the stomach to read it that all these decades later Americans, certainly the military brass and the White House, still haven’t drawn the right lesson from Vietnam.”  You can read the full review here.

BOOK REVIEW: Kill Anything That Moves’ - SFGate

I can’t help but share a glowing review of my new book from yesterday’s San Francisco Chronicle. Joel Whitney calls it an “indispensable new history” and continues: “Kill Anything That Moves is a paradigm-shifting, connect-the-dots history of American atrocities that reads like a thriller; it will convince those with the stomach to read it that all these decades later Americans, certainly the military brass and the White House, still haven’t drawn the right lesson from Vietnam.”  You can read the full review here.

I’m reeling from a exceptionally flattering review in BookForum by national security expert (and former military-intelligence case officer in Vietnam) Jeff Stein who calls Kill Anything that Moves “Astounding… Meticulous, extraordinary, and oddly moving.” 
(via fatal vision - bookforum.com / current issue)

I’m reeling from a exceptionally flattering review in BookForum by national security expert (and former military-intelligence case officer in Vietnam) Jeff Stein who calls Kill Anything that Moves “Astounding… Meticulous, extraordinary, and oddly moving.”

(via fatal vision - bookforum.com / current issue)

If you are faint-hearted, you might want to keep some smelling salts nearby when you read it. It’s that bad… The truth hurts. This is an important book
Vick Mickunas of the Dayton Daily News on my new book, Kill Anything that Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.  It’s rare to see a positive book review that mentions a need for smelling salts, but  Mickunas has written just such an assessment.  For the rest, see “Writer digs into dark U.S. history: slaughters in Vietnam
Sharply focused…powerful… With his urgent but highly readable style, Turse takes us through this landscape of failed policies, government mendacity and Vietnamese anguish, a familiar topography for those steeped in the many histories — the best ones by journalists — of this 1964-75 debacle. But Turse is up to something different and even more provocative: He delves into the secret history of U.S.-led atrocities. He has brought to his book an impressive trove of new research — archives explored and eyewitnesses interviewed in the United States and Vietnam. With superb narrative skill, he spotlights a troubling question: Why, with all the evidence collected by the military at the time of the war, were atrocities not prosecuted?… Will we ever come to terms with this shameful aspect of war? Turse has given us, at least, one step forward.
From today’s Washington Post, a review by John Tirman of my new book, Kill Anything that Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.
A book I read over the weekend absolutely blew my mind. It’s one of those types of books that shakes your world view about something, in this case the U.S. government’s war in Vietnam. It is an absolutely shocking book. It is entitled Kill Anything that Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam by Nick Turse.

The lede of an incredibly flattering review of my new book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam by Jacob G. Hornberger, the founder and president of The Future of Freedom Foundation.

I’m bowled over!