Nick Turse
A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.) 
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.


Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

newyorker:


…as the New York Times put it in a banner front-page headline today, by putting Ryan on the ticket, Romney is “pushing fiscal issues to the forefront.” But if that kind of clarifying, substantive debate is in fact to materialize, Ryan (and Romney) will need to be a lot more explicit, and a lot more honest, about what their budget proposals would actually do to the U.S. government.
That may sound a bit strange, since so many stories about Ryan emphasize how serious and wonky he is, and insist that, unlike most politicians, he’s actually willing to talk in detail about the policies he’s advocating. Yet the reality of Ryan’s approach is actually very different…

Click-through to continue reading James Surowiecki on Paul Ryan’s budget games: http://nyr.kr/MQ2SMG

newyorker:

…as the New York Times put it in a banner front-page headline today, by putting Ryan on the ticket, Romney is “pushing fiscal issues to the forefront.” But if that kind of clarifying, substantive debate is in fact to materialize, Ryan (and Romney) will need to be a lot more explicit, and a lot more honest, about what their budget proposals would actually do to the U.S. government.

That may sound a bit strange, since so many stories about Ryan emphasize how serious and wonky he is, and insist that, unlike most politicians, he’s actually willing to talk in detail about the policies he’s advocating. Yet the reality of Ryan’s approach is actually very different…

Click-through to continue reading James Surowiecki on Paul Ryan’s budget games: http://nyr.kr/MQ2SMG

motherjones:

Inmates in stateside federal prisons only cost 3 percent of that.

Hey, Congress: Still looking for budget cuts?

thealyonashow:

Fireside: Pentagon’s Black Budget

Among the constant political banter about the need to cut spending we have now learned, thanks to blogs like Wired’s Danger Room, that within the Pentagon’s budget, is about 56 billion dollars worth of secret, classified items that are trying to remain in the shadows tucked away from public knowledge.