Nick Turse
killanythingthatmoves:

For more than a decade, pundits, historians, generals, and the chattering classes have argued about how the “Vietnam analogy” applied to Iraq and Afghanistan — and yet for all the ink (and blood) spilled, they managed to miss the one unfailing parallel between America’s wars in all three places: civilian suffering. For all the dissimilarities, botched analogies, and tortured comparisons, there has been one connecting thread in Washington’s foreign wars of the last half century that Americans have seldom found of the slightest interest: misery for local nationals. Civilian suffering is, in fact, the defining characteristic of modern war in general, even if only rarely discussed in the halls of power or the mainstream media.
In my latest TomDispatch article, I offer a set of portraits of war victims along with some staggering statistics about the levels of wartime civilian suffering in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq.  Read the full piece here.  

killanythingthatmoves:

For more than a decade, pundits, historians, generals, and the chattering classes have argued about how the “Vietnam analogy” applied to Iraq and Afghanistan — and yet for all the ink (and blood) spilled, they managed to miss the one unfailing parallel between America’s wars in all three places: civilian suffering. For all the dissimilarities, botched analogies, and tortured comparisons, there has been one connecting thread in Washington’s foreign wars of the last half century that Americans have seldom found of the slightest interest: misery for local nationals. Civilian suffering is, in fact, the defining characteristic of modern war in general, even if only rarely discussed in the halls of power or the mainstream media.

In my latest TomDispatch article, I offer a set of portraits of war victims along with some staggering statistics about the levels of wartime civilian suffering in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq.  Read the full piece here.  

 For more than a decade, pundits, historians, generals, and the chattering classes have argued about how the “Vietnam analogy” applied to Iraq and Afghanistan — and yet for all the ink (and blood) spilled, they managed to miss the one unfailing parallel between America’s wars in all three places: civilian suffering. For all the dissimilarities, botched analogies, and tortured comparisons, there has been one connecting thread in Washington’s foreign wars of the last half century that Americans have seldom found of the slightest interest: misery for local nationals. Civilian suffering is, in fact, the defining characteristic of modern war in general, even if only rarely discussed in the halls of power or the mainstream media. 
In my latest TomDispatch article, I offer a set of portraits of war victims along with some staggering statistics about the levels of wartime civilian suffering in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq.  Read the full piece here.  

For more than a decade, pundits, historians, generals, and the chattering classes have argued about how the “Vietnam analogy” applied to Iraq and Afghanistan — and yet for all the ink (and blood) spilled, they managed to miss the one unfailing parallel between America’s wars in all three places: civilian suffering. For all the dissimilarities, botched analogies, and tortured comparisons, there has been one connecting thread in Washington’s foreign wars of the last half century that Americans have seldom found of the slightest interest: misery for local nationals. Civilian suffering is, in fact, the defining characteristic of modern war in general, even if only rarely discussed in the halls of power or the mainstream media.

In my latest TomDispatch article, I offer a set of portraits of war victims along with some staggering statistics about the levels of wartime civilian suffering in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq.  Read the full piece here.  

Faces of the Syrian Revolution

The Battle of Aleppo

PHOTOGRAPHED BY: Ricardo Garcia Vilanova/Corbis

Faces of the Syrian Revolution

The Battle of Aleppo

PHOTOGRAPHED BY: Ricardo Garcia Vilanova/Corbis
reuters:

U.S. authorities have given cash compensation to the families of Afghans killed in a shooting rampage allegedly carried out by an American soldier in Kandahar province, a family member and a tribal elder said on Sunday.
The families received around $50,000 for each person killed and about $10,000 for each wounded in the shootings in two villages in Panjwai district earlier this month. Afghan officials say 16 people, including nine children and women, were killed in the attacks.
“We were invited by the foreign and Afghan officials in Panjwai yesterday and they said this money is an assistance from Obama,” Haji Jan Agha, who said he lost his cousins, told Reuters, referring to U.S. President Barack Obama.
Read more: Afghan gun massacre families paid compensation

reuters:

U.S. authorities have given cash compensation to the families of Afghans killed in a shooting rampage allegedly carried out by an American soldier in Kandahar province, a family member and a tribal elder said on Sunday.

The families received around $50,000 for each person killed and about $10,000 for each wounded in the shootings in two villages in Panjwai district earlier this month. Afghan officials say 16 people, including nine children and women, were killed in the attacks.

“We were invited by the foreign and Afghan officials in Panjwai yesterday and they said this money is an assistance from Obama,” Haji Jan Agha, who said he lost his cousins, told Reuters, referring to U.S. President Barack Obama.

Read more: Afghan gun massacre families paid compensation

A new study finds U.S. Special Operations Forces are targeting Afghan civilians in violation of the laws of war.

“All I heard was gunfire, screaming and crying. People were begging for mercy. Those who were shooting said nothing - they just fired and fired. Those attacking us were Gbagbo’s militia and Liberians Gbagbo deployed in the country.”

— 18 year old Ivorian man to the UN’s IRIN news agency

A new article by IRIN offers this snapshot of the life of civilians trapped in the path of war.  In this case, it’s the story of 55-year old man and his family from Libya, but swap in different names and it could be any war zone…

"I realized that Ajdabiya wasn’t safe when missiles started to be fired from several different points," said 55-year-old Omar El Zourganei, a science teacher who was born in Ajdabiya.
 
He first left the city three weeks ago for the southern town of Jalu, which lies near `hamada’ scrubland and low sand dunes. “Jalu seemed safe to me, so with my wife and children in the car, we drove there,” he told IRIN. “We didn’t know anyone so we knocked on the door of a local family and they agreed to house us.”

Soon Jalu was overwhelmed with more than 1,000 people from Ajdabiya seeking safe places to sleep.

“Then shelling began in Jalu, so we returned to Ajdabiya,” he said. “A week later, the bombing got heavy and we decided to leave for Benghazi. But it hasn’t been easy. I have four sons fighting on the frontline and I worry about them.”

At least 25 people — including women and children — have been killed in a US drone strike in the Pakistani tribal region of North Waziristan, Pakistani security officials told the BBC.

Chris Hondros: How He Got that Picture : CJR
From Columbia Journalism Review:
As the world knows by now, the photographers Chris Hondros and Tim  Hetherington were killed on April 20 in Misurata, Libya. Hetherington  was the better known of the two for his documentary, Restrepo.  But we have a special feeling for Hondros, whom we got to meet when he  took part in a CJR panel discussion. In late 2006, for our forty-fifth  anniversary issue, the magazine ran an extended oral history, which  later became a book, Reporting Iraq, an oral history of the war  by the journalists who covered it. It included photos, and every time we  laid our potential choices out we were drawn to Hondros’s work. They  had a recognizable humanity and an almost-beautiful light, even when  they depicted the worst. One photo we chose was taken moments after a  family car had been accidently shot up at a checkpoint. We see a soldier  and a blood-covered little girl who had just lost her parents, not an  image you can quickly get out of your head. When Judith Matloff  interviewed Hondros for our history, we found the backstory of that  photo so compelling that we used it to end the book. Here is the result  of that interview, Chris Hondros on how he got that picture…
photo credit: Chris Hondros/Getty

Chris Hondros: How He Got that Picture : CJR

From Columbia Journalism Review:

As the world knows by now, the photographers Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington were killed on April 20 in Misurata, Libya. Hetherington was the better known of the two for his documentary, Restrepo. But we have a special feeling for Hondros, whom we got to meet when he took part in a CJR panel discussion. In late 2006, for our forty-fifth anniversary issue, the magazine ran an extended oral history, which later became a book, Reporting Iraq, an oral history of the war by the journalists who covered it. It included photos, and every time we laid our potential choices out we were drawn to Hondros’s work. They had a recognizable humanity and an almost-beautiful light, even when they depicted the worst. One photo we chose was taken moments after a family car had been accidently shot up at a checkpoint. We see a soldier and a blood-covered little girl who had just lost her parents, not an image you can quickly get out of your head. When Judith Matloff interviewed Hondros for our history, we found the backstory of that photo so compelling that we used it to end the book. Here is the result of that interview, Chris Hondros on how he got that picture…

photo credit: Chris Hondros/Getty