Nick Turse
"The Saola, a long-horned ox, was photographed by a camera in a forest in central Vietnam in September, the WWF said in a statement Wednesday…
The animal was [first] discovered in the remote areas of high mountains near the border with Laos in 1992 when a joint team of WWF and Vietnam’s forest control agency found a skull with unusual horns in a hunter’s home. The find proved to be the first large mammal new to science in more than 50 years, according to the WWF.
In Vietnam, the last sighting of a Saola in the wild was in 1998, according to Dang Dinh Nguyen, director of the Saola natural reserve in central province of Quang Nam.”
Thanks AP!
(via Rare mammal first sighted in Vietnam in years - Yahoo News)

"The Saola, a long-horned ox, was photographed by a camera in a forest in central Vietnam in September, the WWF said in a statement Wednesday…

The animal was [first] discovered in the remote areas of high mountains near the border with Laos in 1992 when a joint team of WWF and Vietnam’s forest control agency found a skull with unusual horns in a hunter’s home. The find proved to be the first large mammal new to science in more than 50 years, according to the WWF.

In Vietnam, the last sighting of a Saola in the wild was in 1998, according to Dang Dinh Nguyen, director of the Saola natural reserve in central province of Quang Nam.”

Thanks AP!

(via Rare mammal first sighted in Vietnam in years - Yahoo News)

Climate change is hitting plants and animals just as hard as us.
One of six major takeaways from the new report by the US Global Change Research Program. (via motherjones)

Of all the findings in the 2012 edition of the World Energy Outlook, the one that merits the greatest international attention is the one that received the least. Even if governments take vigorous steps to curb greenhouse gas emissions, the report concluded, the continuing increase in fossil fuel consumption will result in “a long-term average global temperature increase of 3.6 degrees C.”

This should stop everyone in their tracks. Most scientists believe that an increase of 2 degrees Celsius is about all the planet can accommodate without unimaginably catastrophic consequences: sea-level increases that will wipe out many coastal cities, persistent droughts that will destroy farmland on which hundreds of millions of people depend for their survival, the collapse of vital ecosystems, and far more. An increase of 3.6 degrees C essentially suggests the end of human civilization as we know it.

Of all the findings in the 2012 edition of the World Energy Outlook, the one that merits the greatest international attention is the one that received the least. Even if governments take vigorous steps to curb greenhouse gas emissions, the report concluded, the continuing increase in fossil fuel consumption will result in “a long-term average global temperature increase of 3.6 degrees C.”

This should stop everyone in their tracks. Most scientists believe that an increase of 2 degrees Celsius is about all the planet can accommodate without unimaginably catastrophic consequences: sea-level increases that will wipe out many coastal cities, persistent droughts that will destroy farmland on which hundreds of millions of people depend for their survival, the collapse of vital ecosystems, and far more. An increase of 3.6 degrees C essentially suggests the end of human civilization as we know it.

The concept of loss and damage is increasingly important because we have not mitigated or adapted to climate change in time: whatever we do now, there will still be losses and irreversible impacts

From a joint paper produced by the NGOs ActionAid, Germanwatch, Care International and the World Wide Fund for Nature concerning the concept of “loss and damage,” a phrase that refers to a “range of harms incurred in developing countries from the impact of climate change that cannot be avoided either through mitigation or adaptation.”  

IRIN: “When the Damage is Done”

“Heavy rains are wreaking havoc here and our only source of livelihood, rice, is threatened. The floods have washed [it all away] and are threatening to displace us. I only managed to salvage a few bags of rice when the water subsided,” Leonard Onyango, a rice farmer, told the United Nations’ IRIN news service.
Onyango is one of thousands of farmers in western Kenya, who have watched as flood waters have washed away their rice harvest and, in some cases, their homes.
“We are estimating that some 2,000 farmers have lost their crops due to the raging floods. Much of this crop had been harvested and was still in the farms being dried,” said James Samo, agricultural specialist at Kenya’s Ministry of Agriculture.
IRIN Africa | KENYA: Rice farmers lose harvest to floods

“Heavy rains are wreaking havoc here and our only source of livelihood, rice, is threatened. The floods have washed [it all away] and are threatening to displace us. I only managed to salvage a few bags of rice when the water subsided,” Leonard Onyango, a rice farmer, told the United Nations’ IRIN news service.

Onyango is one of thousands of farmers in western Kenya, who have watched as flood waters have washed away their rice harvest and, in some cases, their homes.

“We are estimating that some 2,000 farmers have lost their crops due to the raging floods. Much of this crop had been harvested and was still in the farms being dried,” said James Samo, agricultural specialist at Kenya’s Ministry of Agriculture.

IRIN Africa | KENYA: Rice farmers lose harvest to floods

I wish Sandy hadn’t happened. But it did, and there have been and will be more disasters like this. I hope that radical change arises from it. The climate has already changed. May we change to meet the challenges.
I wish Sandy hadn’t happened. But it did, and there have been and will be more disasters like this. I hope that radical change arises from it. The climate has already changed. May we change to meet the challenges.
I wish Sandy hadn’t happened. But it did, and there have been and will be more disasters like this. I hope that radical change arises from it. The climate has already changed. May we change to meet the challenges.
(via Tom Toles)

(via Tom Toles)