Nick Turse
killanythingthatmoves:

For more than a decade, pundits, historians, generals, and the chattering classes have argued about how the “Vietnam analogy” applied to Iraq and Afghanistan — and yet for all the ink (and blood) spilled, they managed to miss the one unfailing parallel between America’s wars in all three places: civilian suffering. For all the dissimilarities, botched analogies, and tortured comparisons, there has been one connecting thread in Washington’s foreign wars of the last half century that Americans have seldom found of the slightest interest: misery for local nationals. Civilian suffering is, in fact, the defining characteristic of modern war in general, even if only rarely discussed in the halls of power or the mainstream media.
In my latest TomDispatch article, I offer a set of portraits of war victims along with some staggering statistics about the levels of wartime civilian suffering in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq.  Read the full piece here.  

killanythingthatmoves:

For more than a decade, pundits, historians, generals, and the chattering classes have argued about how the “Vietnam analogy” applied to Iraq and Afghanistan — and yet for all the ink (and blood) spilled, they managed to miss the one unfailing parallel between America’s wars in all three places: civilian suffering. For all the dissimilarities, botched analogies, and tortured comparisons, there has been one connecting thread in Washington’s foreign wars of the last half century that Americans have seldom found of the slightest interest: misery for local nationals. Civilian suffering is, in fact, the defining characteristic of modern war in general, even if only rarely discussed in the halls of power or the mainstream media.

In my latest TomDispatch article, I offer a set of portraits of war victims along with some staggering statistics about the levels of wartime civilian suffering in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq.  Read the full piece here.  

 For more than a decade, pundits, historians, generals, and the chattering classes have argued about how the “Vietnam analogy” applied to Iraq and Afghanistan — and yet for all the ink (and blood) spilled, they managed to miss the one unfailing parallel between America’s wars in all three places: civilian suffering. For all the dissimilarities, botched analogies, and tortured comparisons, there has been one connecting thread in Washington’s foreign wars of the last half century that Americans have seldom found of the slightest interest: misery for local nationals. Civilian suffering is, in fact, the defining characteristic of modern war in general, even if only rarely discussed in the halls of power or the mainstream media. 
In my latest TomDispatch article, I offer a set of portraits of war victims along with some staggering statistics about the levels of wartime civilian suffering in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq.  Read the full piece here.  

For more than a decade, pundits, historians, generals, and the chattering classes have argued about how the “Vietnam analogy” applied to Iraq and Afghanistan — and yet for all the ink (and blood) spilled, they managed to miss the one unfailing parallel between America’s wars in all three places: civilian suffering. For all the dissimilarities, botched analogies, and tortured comparisons, there has been one connecting thread in Washington’s foreign wars of the last half century that Americans have seldom found of the slightest interest: misery for local nationals. Civilian suffering is, in fact, the defining characteristic of modern war in general, even if only rarely discussed in the halls of power or the mainstream media.

In my latest TomDispatch article, I offer a set of portraits of war victims along with some staggering statistics about the levels of wartime civilian suffering in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq.  Read the full piece here.  

UGANDA: Increasing support to survivors of sexual assault 
Sexual and gender-based violence “is a big problem eating the society. For long, offenders have been escaping the hands of the law because victims fail to [obtain] medical evidence,” Moses Byaruhanga, the head of the medical service in the Uganda Police Force, told the United Nations’ news service, IRIN.

UGANDA: Increasing support to survivors of sexual assault

Sexual and gender-based violence “is a big problem eating the society. For long, offenders have been escaping the hands of the law because victims fail to [obtain] medical evidence,” Moses Byaruhanga, the head of the medical service in the Uganda Police Force, told the United Nations’ news service, IRIN.

IRIN: Rethinking urban poverty
Drawing on 20 years of research, a new book, Urban Poverty in the Global South: Scale and Nature, “documents how the scale and depth of urban poverty in Africa, and much of Asia and Latin America, is greatly underestimated due to ‘inappropriate’ definitions and measurements,” according to the United Nations’ news agency, IRIN.  “Almost all official measurements of urban poverty are also made with no dialogue with those who live in poverty and who struggle to live with inadequate incomes,” according to the book’s summary.  “It is always experts’ judgment that identifies those who are ‘poor’ who may then ‘targeted’ by some program; at best, they become ‘objects’ of government policy, which may bring some improvement in conditions, but they are rarely seen as citizens with rights and legitimate demands who also have resources and capabilities that can contribute much to more effective poverty reduction programs.”

IRIN: Rethinking urban poverty

Drawing on 20 years of research, a new book, Urban Poverty in the Global South: Scale and Nature, “documents how the scale and depth of urban poverty in Africa, and much of Asia and Latin America, is greatly underestimated due to ‘inappropriate’ definitions and measurements,” according to the United Nations’ news agency, IRIN.  “Almost all official measurements of urban poverty are also made with no dialogue with those who live in poverty and who struggle to live with inadequate incomes,” according to the book’s summary.  “It is always experts’ judgment that identifies those who are ‘poor’ who may then ‘targeted’ by some program; at best, they become ‘objects’ of government policy, which may bring some improvement in conditions, but they are rarely seen as citizens with rights and legitimate demands who also have resources and capabilities that can contribute much to more effective poverty reduction programs.”

War Widows Struggle in a ‘Man’s World’ | Inter Press Service
Amantha Perera begins:
"Sita Tamang’s husband went missing sometime in 2004, two years before Nepal’s civil war came to an end. A native of Dharan, a town about 600 kilometres southeast of Kathmandu, Tamang waited seven years after his disappearance before she tried to claim compensation offered by the government after the 2006 peace deal ended this country’s bloodshed.
When she finally managed to get hold of government officials in Dharan overseeing compensation procedures, she was met with the thorny request that she ‘prove’ her marriage to the father of her three children, whom she had lived with for a decade and a half.
As was customary, Tamang and her husband had gone through the traditional marriage ceremony but had not obtained any civil documents.
In addition to taking care of her three children, including two daughters, Tamang was saddled with the added burden of seeking the required paperwork before even beginning the bureaucratic process of securing compensation.
'That is the way things are here,’ she told IPS simply. ‘Women will always have it a bit hard.’”
Read the rest here.

War Widows Struggle in a ‘Man’s World’ | Inter Press Service

begins:

"Sita Tamang’s husband went missing sometime in 2004, two years before Nepal’s civil war came to an end. A native of Dharan, a town about 600 kilometres southeast of Kathmandu, Tamang waited seven years after his disappearance before she tried to claim compensation offered by the government after the 2006 peace deal ended this country’s bloodshed.

When she finally managed to get hold of government officials in Dharan overseeing compensation procedures, she was met with the thorny request that she ‘prove’ her marriage to the father of her three children, whom she had lived with for a decade and a half.

As was customary, Tamang and her husband had gone through the traditional marriage ceremony but had not obtained any civil documents.

In addition to taking care of her three children, including two daughters, Tamang was saddled with the added burden of seeking the required paperwork before even beginning the bureaucratic process of securing compensation.

'That is the way things are here,’ she told IPS simply. ‘Women will always have it a bit hard.’”

Read the rest here.