Nick Turse
What is Operation New Normal and why won’t the U.S. military talk about it?
In my latest investigation of shadowy U.S. military missions in Africa, I try to figure out just that. The article begins:
“What is Operation New Normal? It’s a question without an answer, a riddle the U.S. military refuses to solve. It’s a secret operation in Africa that no one knows anything about. Except that someone does. His name is Lieutenant Colonel Robert E. Lee Magee. He lives and breathes Operation New Normal. But he doesn’t want to breath paint fumes or talk to me, so you can’t know anything about it.
Confused? Stay with me.
“Whatever Operation New Normal may be pales in comparison to the real “new normal” for U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM). The lower-cased variant is bold and muscular. It’s an expeditionary force on a war footing. To the men involved, it’s a story of growth and expansion, new battlefields, ‘combat,’ and ‘war.’ It’s the culmination of years of construction, ingratiation, and interventions, the fruits of wide-eyed expansion and dismal policy failures, the backing of proxies to fight America’s battles, while increasing U.S. personnel and firepower in and around the continent. It is, to quote an officer with AFRICOM, the blossoming of a ‘war-fighting combatant command.’ And unlike Operation New Normal, it’s finally heading for a media outlet near you.”
Read the entire article here: Nick Turse, How “Benghazi” Birthed the New Normal in Africa | TomDispatch

What is Operation New Normal and why won’t the U.S. military talk about it?

In my latest investigation of shadowy U.S. military missions in Africa, I try to figure out just that. The article begins:

“What is Operation New Normal? It’s a question without an answer, a riddle the U.S. military refuses to solve. It’s a secret operation in Africa that no one knows anything about. Except that someone does. His name is Lieutenant Colonel Robert E. Lee Magee. He lives and breathes Operation New Normal. But he doesn’t want to breath paint fumes or talk to me, so you can’t know anything about it.

Confused? Stay with me.

“Whatever Operation New Normal may be pales in comparison to the real “new normal” for U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM). The lower-cased variant is bold and muscular. It’s an expeditionary force on a war footing. To the men involved, it’s a story of growth and expansion, new battlefields, ‘combat,’ and ‘war.’ It’s the culmination of years of construction, ingratiation, and interventions, the fruits of wide-eyed expansion and dismal policy failures, the backing of proxies to fight America’s battles, while increasing U.S. personnel and firepower in and around the continent. It is, to quote an officer with AFRICOM, the blossoming of a ‘war-fighting combatant command.’ And unlike Operation New Normal, it’s finally heading for a media outlet near you.”

Read the entire article here: Nick Turse, How “Benghazi” Birthed the New Normal in Africa | TomDispatch

centerforinvestigativereporting:

The United States is the world’s biggest economy and the leading exporter of wheat, corn, beef and many other commodities. It also has the most unequal wealth distribution of all major developed countries. Economic woes in the U.S. have led to one in seven Americans to rely on food assistance.
Get more information on world food statistics from the U.S. and countries around the world in our interactive map.

centerforinvestigativereporting:

The United States is the world’s biggest economy and the leading exporter of wheat, corn, beef and many other commodities. It also has the most unequal wealth distribution of all major developed countries. Economic woes in the U.S. have led to one in seven Americans to rely on food assistance.

Get more information on world food statistics from the U.S. and countries around the world in our interactive map.

Writing about the Guardian’s brilliant work on the News Corp scandal, the Columbia Journalism Review's Dean Starkman writes: “It’s a testament to investigative reporting—expensive, time-consuming, risky, stressful—at newspapers. If you think investigations aren’t under pressure at institutional news organizations, you’ve probably been caught on the news hamster wheel yourself.”
(via The News Corp. Scandal is a Triumph for Investigative Reporting : CJR)
photo credit: This image has been posted to Flickr by the copyright holder, the World Economic Forum

Writing about the Guardian’s brilliant work on the News Corp scandal, the Columbia Journalism Review's Dean Starkman writes: “It’s a testament to investigative reporting—expensive, time-consuming, risky, stressful—at newspapers. If you think investigations aren’t under pressure at institutional news organizations, you’ve probably been caught on the news hamster wheel yourself.”

(via The News Corp. Scandal is a Triumph for Investigative Reporting : CJR)

photo credit: This image has been posted to Flickr by the copyright holder, the World Economic Forum

Last year, ProPublica won the first Pulitzer Prize ever awarded to an online news organization. This year, the independent newsroom won the first prize ever awarded for stories not published in print.

Congrats ProPublica!

NPR, PBS Put Millions Into Investigative Reporting
From a new AP report on one of the few “sunny” stories about always expensive, but exceptionally vital investigative reporting.  In a sad irony, however, this link to the AP story will take you to the Huffington Post who ought to be putting more of its big bucks into paying writers and reporters, investigative and otherwise.  But I digress…
"NPR, PBS and local public broadcast stations around the country are  hiring more journalists and pumping millions of dollars into  investigative news to make up for what they see as a lack of  deep-digging coverage by their for-profit counterparts.
…
'Where the marketplace is unable to serve, that's the role  of public media,' PBS President and CEO Paula Kerger said last year at a  summit on the future of media at the Federal Communications Commission. 'PBS exists to serve the people, not to sell them.'”

NPR, PBS Put Millions Into Investigative Reporting

From a new AP report on one of the few “sunny” stories about always expensive, but exceptionally vital investigative reporting.  In a sad irony, however, this link to the AP story will take you to the Huffington
Post who ought to be putting more of its big bucks into paying writers and reporters, investigative and otherwise.  But I digress…

"NPR, PBS and local public broadcast stations around the country are hiring more journalists and pumping millions of dollars into investigative news to make up for what they see as a lack of deep-digging coverage by their for-profit counterparts.

'Where the marketplace is unable to serve, that's the role of public media,' PBS President and CEO Paula Kerger said last year at a summit on the future of media at the Federal Communications Commission. 'PBS exists to serve the people, not to sell them.'”