Nick Turse
(via IRIN Asia | Little help for UXO victims in Laos | Laos | Conflict | Security)

Around 25 percent of villages in Laos are contaminated by unexploded ordnance (UXOs), mainly from US bombing missions between 1964 and 1973, according to the Lao National Unexploded Ordnance Programme, and while UXO casualties have fallen sharply in recent years there is little support for UXO victims.

(via IRIN Asia | Little help for UXO victims in Laos | Laos | Conflict | Security)

Around 25 percent of villages in Laos are contaminated by unexploded ordnance (UXOs), mainly from US bombing missions between 1964 and 1973, according to the Lao National Unexploded Ordnance Programme, and while UXO casualties have fallen sharply in recent years there is little support for UXO victims.

Faced with high food prices, low income and barely a patch of arable land, hundreds of residents of Nairobi’s densely populated slums have adopted a novel form of intensive agriculture: a farm in a sack.
(via IRIN Africa | KENYA: Bag a farm)

Faced with high food prices, low income and barely a patch of arable land, hundreds of residents of Nairobi’s densely populated slums have adopted a novel form of intensive agriculture: a farm in a sack.

(via IRIN Africa | KENYA: Bag a farm)

I heard some noise when the plane bombed people, and immediately people were running away, and then I saw a boy had been bombed and died.

Shops were burning up and everyone was scared of the plane.

The boy used to go to school and play with the other small boys in the football field.

His father told him to go with three other boys and buy some shoes. He was still holding the shoes when he died. He was only a teenager.

The main bomb fell on that shop, and then fire spread to two other shops.

That plane came to kill people. It wasn’t targeting the army, as if you want to get them you bomb the front lines.

Now I fear being here. The day that there was bombardment, all the reeds of of my fence collapsed around my house. Children were there. It was only God who could know if somebody was going to survive.

I am scared of being in my home but I have nowhere else to go.

There was a lot of fear when troops withdrew from Heglig. There a lot of military around here now [there is a barracks and airstrip a few kilometres away] and I’m scared that the enemy might come into the town, because they are not seeing enough soldiers in the front line.

Most of my neighbours have already fled. Two households next to me, five opposite, and others even down the other side.

 “No Sleep Till Benghazi”
Photo of rebel fighters in central Benghazi courtesy of IRIN

“No Sleep Till Benghazi”

Photo of rebel fighters in central Benghazi courtesy of IRIN

Most Bedouins from Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula never think to register their marriages. A palm leaf from the father of the bride to the groom is enough to mark the union; families and tribal elders stand witness to the ceremony.

But not having a marriage certificate, or ID card, has many disadvantages. Without proper papers you are cut off from government services. Talal Rashid, 42, has no papers and struggles to get health care for his wife, and education for his children.

Landmine danger persists in Somalia 
"Thousands of landmines and other unexploded ordnance (UXO) scattered in parts of Somalia over past decades of conflict are emerging as a threat to the relative security now being enjoyed there, with inadequate demining expertise posing a challenge, say officials." 
For more, read the full IRIN article here.

Landmine danger persists in Somalia

"Thousands of landmines and other unexploded ordnance (UXO) scattered in parts of Somalia over past decades of conflict are emerging as a threat to the relative security now being enjoyed there, with inadequate demining expertise posing a challenge, say officials." 

For more, read the full IRIN article here.

Killings, disappearances in Mali’s climate of suspicion 
A new report from the U.N.’s news agency, IRIN, begins: “Seyo Sangho’s husband was arrested by Malian army soldiers at the central market in Konna in central Mali… after getting into an argument with another man. ‘I haven’t seen him since,’ she says. ‘That was 10 days ago.’”
For the full article, click here.

Killings, disappearances in Mali’s climate of suspicion

A new report from the U.N.’s news agency, IRIN, begins: “Seyo Sangho’s husband was arrested by Malian army soldiers at the central market in Konna in central Mali… after getting into an argument with another man. ‘I haven’t seen him since,’ she says. ‘That was 10 days ago.’”

For the full article, click here.

Civilians return to battle-scarred Malian town of Diabaly 
The United Nations’ news service, IRIN, reports on the return of civilians to the Malian town of Diabaly following its capture by Islamist forces and subsequent air strikes by French forces.
“I no longer recognize Diabaly. Everywhere you look there are burnt-out cars and tanks, destroyed buildings, the stadium has been completely destroyed, frontless shops have been looted,” resident Mariam Sissoko told IRIN.

Civilians return to battle-scarred Malian town of Diabaly

The United Nations’ news service, IRIN, reports on the return of civilians to the Malian town of Diabaly following its capture by Islamist forces and subsequent air strikes by French forces.

“I no longer recognize Diabaly. Everywhere you look there are burnt-out cars and tanks, destroyed buildings, the stadium has been completely destroyed, frontless shops have been looted,” resident Mariam Sissoko told IRIN.

Several Southern African countries are dealing with the effects of flooding following heavy rains over much of the region in the past week.
(via IRIN Africa | Widespread flooding hits Southern Africa 

Several Southern African countries are dealing with the effects of flooding following heavy rains over much of the region in the past week.

(via IRIN Africa | Widespread flooding hits Southern Africa 

The United Nations’ news agency, IRIN, reports on desperate circumstances in the Mbéra refugee camp in eastern Mauritania which is home to 55,000 Malians.  Just under one in five children “is malnourished, and 4.6 percent are severely malnourished - two to three times the national average, according to a just-released November survey by NGO Médecins sans Frontières (MSF).” Children under five “are dying mainly from a combination of malnutrition and malaria, respiratory infections and diarrhoea, according to MSF head in Mauritania Karl Nawezi, who describes the situation as ‘alarming and unacceptable’”.
For the full story (which you’re unlikely to to read about on the front page of any western paper, much less see on the nightly news) go to: IRIN Africa | MAURITANIA: Refugees face “alarming” malnutrition, mortality rates

The United Nations’ news agency, IRIN, reports on desperate circumstances in the Mbéra refugee camp in eastern Mauritania which is home to 55,000 Malians.  Just under one in five children “is malnourished, and 4.6 percent are severely malnourished - two to three times the national average, according to a just-released November survey by NGO Médecins sans Frontières (MSF).”

Children under five “are dying mainly from a combination of malnutrition and malaria, respiratory infections and diarrhoea, according to MSF head in Mauritania Karl Nawezi, who describes the situation as ‘alarming and unacceptable’”.

For the full story (which you’re unlikely to to read about on the front page of any western paper, much less see on the nightly news) go to: IRIN Africa | MAURITANIA: Refugees face “alarming” malnutrition, mortality rates