Nick Turse
A compound in Mali, an airfield in Niger, a string of air bases across the north of the continent and more than two years of “war” in Africa. Read my latest article to know what U.S. officials say behind closed doors about the future of U.S. ops in Africa.

A compound in Mali, an airfield in Niger, a string of air bases across the north of the continent and more than two years of “war” in Africa. Read my latest article to know what U.S. officials say behind closed doors about the future of U.S. ops in Africa.

America’s Non-Stop Military Ops in Africa
The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.
Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”? (via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

America’s Non-Stop Military Ops in Africa

The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.

Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”?

(via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

Mick Deane 
Sky News
Killed on August 14, 2013, in Cairo, Egypt 
Sky News cameraman Mick Deane was shot and killed as Egyptian security forces stormed a sit-in demonstration at Rabaa Adawiya, in Nasr City, Cairo, on the morning of Wednesday, Aug, 14. The demonstrators were supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood. Around 149 people were killed in clashes in the capital and ensuing violence around the country, the Egyptian Health Ministry said, according to news reports. The Muslim Brotherhood said the death toll was much higher.

Deane, 61, had worked for Sky for 15 years, based in Washington, D.C., and then Jerusalem, the network reported. He had been covering the clashes in Egypt with Sky’s Middle East correspondent, Sam Kiley. None of the other team members were hurt, the broadcaster said.

The BBC reported that Deane was born in Hannover, Germany. The Washington Post said he was the husband of former Post reporter Daniela Deane and that the couple have two sons.
(via Mick Deane - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)

Mick Deane

Sky News

Killed on August 14, 2013, in Cairo, Egypt

Sky News cameraman Mick Deane was shot and killed as Egyptian security forces stormed a sit-in demonstration at Rabaa Adawiya, in Nasr City, Cairo, on the morning of Wednesday, Aug, 14. The demonstrators were supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood. Around 149 people were killed in clashes in the capital and ensuing violence around the country, the Egyptian Health Ministry said, according to news reports. The Muslim Brotherhood said the death toll was much higher.

Deane, 61, had worked for Sky for 15 years, based in Washington, D.C., and then Jerusalem, the network reported. He had been covering the clashes in Egypt with Sky’s Middle East correspondent, Sam Kiley. None of the other team members were hurt, the broadcaster said.

The BBC reported that Deane was born in Hannover, Germany. The Washington Post said he was the husband of former Post reporter Daniela Deane and that the couple have two sons.

(via Mick Deane - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)

[T]he press is not supposed to be cozy with the powerful. Journalists are supposed to be a check on power, and that means not being afraid to be adversarial when needed: to dig out the truth when people don’t want us to, to state it clearly and let the chips fall where they may.

—  New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan, from Lodestars in a Murky Media World - NYTimes.com

Real journalists are not for sale, not for insider access, a free lunch or the prospect of a future book contract. The best journalism is about truth-seeking and truth-telling; it’s meant to serve the public… the press is not supposed to be cozy with the powerful. Journalists are supposed to be a check on power, and that means not being afraid to be adversarial when needed: to dig out the truth when people don’t want us to, to state it clearly and let the chips fall where they may.
New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan, from Lodestars in a Murky Media World - NYTimes.com
Mohamed Mohamud 
Universal TV
Killed on October 26, 2013, in Mogadishu, Somalia 
Unidentified gunmen shot Universal TV reporter Mohamed Mohamud, 26, outside of his home on October 22, 2013, in Wadajir district of the capital, Mogadishu, local journalists told CPJ. He was shot six times in the neck, chest, and shoulder as he drove to work, the journalists said. Mohamed, also known as “Tima’ade,” died of internal bleeding around 10:30 p.m on October 26.

Mohamed was an outspoken reporter who often covered social and security issues in Mogadishu, local journalists said. It’s not clear who carried out the attack, although a Twitter account claiming to represent the Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab claimed responsibility for the shooting. Local journalists could not pinpoint one particular report by the U.K.-based, privately owned broadcaster that may have led to the attack, but said Mohamed had received text message threats in the past by suspected Al-Shabaab militiamen.

Mohamed is survived by a wife and daughter.
(via Mohamed Mohamud - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)

Mohamed Mohamud

Universal TV

Killed on October 26, 2013, in Mogadishu, Somalia

Unidentified gunmen shot Universal TV reporter Mohamed Mohamud, 26, outside of his home on October 22, 2013, in Wadajir district of the capital, Mogadishu, local journalists told CPJ. He was shot six times in the neck, chest, and shoulder as he drove to work, the journalists said. Mohamed, also known as “Tima’ade,” died of internal bleeding around 10:30 p.m on October 26.

Mohamed was an outspoken reporter who often covered social and security issues in Mogadishu, local journalists said. It’s not clear who carried out the attack, although a Twitter account claiming to represent the Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab claimed responsibility for the shooting. Local journalists could not pinpoint one particular report by the U.K.-based, privately owned broadcaster that may have led to the attack, but said Mohamed had received text message threats in the past by suspected Al-Shabaab militiamen.

Mohamed is survived by a wife and daughter.

(via Mohamed Mohamud - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)

Embedding with the American and British armies had the disadvantage that the journalists ended up having the same experiences as the soldiers and thinking many of the same thoughts. It’s difficult not to bond with people who are important to one’s safety and with whom one shares common dangers. Armies like the embedding system in part because they can favour sympathetic reporters and exclude the more critical. For journalists, counterintuitively, it often means missing crucial parts of a war, since an experienced guerrilla commander will naturally attack wherever the enemy forces are absent or weak. Anybody embedded with the army will tend to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. In 2004 when the US Marines stormed the city of Fallujah, killing many insurgents, they were accompanied by most of Baghdad’s press corps. It was a famous and well-publicised victory, but largely ignored by the media at the time was the insurgent counter-stroke: the capture of the much larger city of Mosul in northern Iraq, from which US soldiers had withdrawn.
from a not-to-be-missed piece by Patrick Cockburn, the veteran war reporter for The Independent.  For the whole article, see Patrick Cockburn · Diary: Four Wars · London Review of Books, 10 October 2013
In online comments and over email, I was called a prostitute and the C-word. J. B. Handley, a critic of childhood vaccination and the founder of the autism group Generation Rescue, affiliated with the actress Jenny McCarthy, sent me an essay titled, “Paul Offit Rapes (intellectually) Amy Wallace and Wired Magazine.” In it, he implied that my subject had slipped me a date-rape drug. Later, an anti-vaccine website Photoshopped my head onto the body of a woman in a strapless dress who sat next to Dr. Offit at a festive dinner table. The main course? A human baby.
Amy Wallace — who in 2009 wrote a cover story for Wired magazine about the anti-vaccine movement and profiled Paul Offit, a leading proponent of vaccines for children — from Life as a Female Journalist: Hot or Not? - NYTimes.com
In online comments and over email, I was called a prostitute and the C-word. J. B. Handley, a critic of childhood vaccination and the founder of the autism group Generation Rescue, affiliated with the actress Jenny McCarthy, sent me an essay titled, “Paul Offit Rapes (intellectually) Amy Wallace and Wired Magazine.” In it, he implied that my subject had slipped me a date-rape drug. Later, an anti-vaccine website Photoshopped my head onto the body of a woman in a strapless dress who sat next to Dr. Offit at a festive dinner table. The main course? A human baby.
Amy Wallace — who in 2009 wrote a cover story for Wired magazine about the anti-vaccine movement and profiled Paul Offit, a leading proponent of vaccines for children — from Life as a Female Journalist: Hot or Not? - NYTimes.com
In online comments and over email, I was called a prostitute and the C-word. J. B. Handley, a critic of childhood vaccination and the founder of the autism group Generation Rescue, affiliated with the actress Jenny McCarthy, sent me an essay titled, “Paul Offit Rapes (intellectually) Amy Wallace and Wired Magazine.” In it, he implied that my subject had slipped me a date-rape drug. Later, an anti-vaccine website Photoshopped my head onto the body of a woman in a strapless dress who sat next to Dr. Offit at a festive dinner table. The main course? A human baby.
Amy Wallace — who in 2009 wrote a cover story for Wired magazine about the anti-vaccine movement and profiled Paul Offit, a leading proponent of vaccines for children — from Life as a Female Journalist: Hot or Not? - NYTimes.com