Nick Turse
Faced with high food prices, low income and barely a patch of arable land, hundreds of residents of Nairobi’s densely populated slums have adopted a novel form of intensive agriculture: a farm in a sack.
(via IRIN Africa | KENYA: Bag a farm)

Faced with high food prices, low income and barely a patch of arable land, hundreds of residents of Nairobi’s densely populated slums have adopted a novel form of intensive agriculture: a farm in a sack.

(via IRIN Africa | KENYA: Bag a farm)

guardian:


Nairobi, Kenya: A demonstrator rolls on the ground in celebration after he and others burned mock coffins outside parliament 

Photograph: Ben Curtis/AP

guardian:

Nairobi, Kenya: A demonstrator rolls on the ground in celebration after he and others burned mock coffins outside parliament

Photograph: Ben Curtis/AP
pulitzercenter:

Photographer Micah Albert won the People category in the National Geographic Photo Contest with the above photo of a woman in Dandora, a 30 acre landfill in Nairobi, Kenya. See more of his photos and read about the people in Dandora here.

pulitzercenter:

Photographer Micah Albert won the People category in the National Geographic Photo Contest with the above photo of a woman in Dandora, a 30 acre landfill in Nairobi, Kenya. See more of his photos and read about the people in Dandora here.

Somebody living in a slum and very poor like I am must make a choice. I can’t use 10 Kenya shillings (US$0.12) to pay for a toilet every day when that can buy me a jerrycan of water for bathing and washing my clothes

Walter Opicha, a resident of Manyatta, a sprawling slum in the western Kenya city of Kisumu, tells the United Nations’ news agency IRIN about the hard choices slum dwellers make everyday. 

Read more at: IRIN Africa | KENYA: Human waste woes in slums

For some time, I solely depended on selling vegetables around the camp. But the business was rarely profitable as clients were few. I decided to complement my vegetables business with brewing chang’aa [an illicit alcoholic beverage].

Though I know the latter is illegal, it boosts my daily income. From both businesses, I make a profit of 250 Kenyan shillings (about US$3) per day. Being the sole bread winner for my children, I have to balance the cost of food, school fees and other family needs.

For me, my children’s education is more basic a need than three meals a day. When there is money, we take tea with milk and sugar, for example. But when business is low, or needs are high, warm water is enough for our breakfast.

Cities with more than 500,000 inhabitants account for over 70% of homicides in Costa Rica, 68% in Guatemala, and 63% in El Salvador.

Crimes may be more likely to be reported in urban areas, skewing the statistics. In a study in Kenya, for example, urban inhabitants were more likely to report crimes than their rural counterparts.

In many countries, urban areas have a higher rate of violence using firearms. Fifty metropolitan areas surveyed in a recent U.S. study, representing 54% of the national population, accounted for 67% of firearms homicides.

While the size of cities does not appear to have a direct correlation with violent crime rates, a high rate of urbanization often correlates with greater violence.

Other factors that can exacerbate urban armed violence include: rates of unemployment; high proportions of youth; low levels of education; poor urban design; proliferation of firearms; and high density of informal settlements.

Key findings from Urban Armed Violence, a new report by the Small Arms Survey and the Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence and Development.
“Heavy rains are wreaking havoc here and our only source of livelihood, rice, is threatened. The floods have washed [it all away] and are threatening to displace us. I only managed to salvage a few bags of rice when the water subsided,” Leonard Onyango, a rice farmer, told the United Nations’ IRIN news service.
Onyango is one of thousands of farmers in western Kenya, who have watched as flood waters have washed away their rice harvest and, in some cases, their homes.
“We are estimating that some 2,000 farmers have lost their crops due to the raging floods. Much of this crop had been harvested and was still in the farms being dried,” said James Samo, agricultural specialist at Kenya’s Ministry of Agriculture.
IRIN Africa | KENYA: Rice farmers lose harvest to floods

“Heavy rains are wreaking havoc here and our only source of livelihood, rice, is threatened. The floods have washed [it all away] and are threatening to displace us. I only managed to salvage a few bags of rice when the water subsided,” Leonard Onyango, a rice farmer, told the United Nations’ IRIN news service.

Onyango is one of thousands of farmers in western Kenya, who have watched as flood waters have washed away their rice harvest and, in some cases, their homes.

“We are estimating that some 2,000 farmers have lost their crops due to the raging floods. Much of this crop had been harvested and was still in the farms being dried,” said James Samo, agricultural specialist at Kenya’s Ministry of Agriculture.

IRIN Africa | KENYA: Rice farmers lose harvest to floods

Secret Wars, Secret Bases, and the Pentagon’s “New Spice Route” in Africa

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the Pentagon has set up bases all over Africa, in places like Nzara, South Sudan; Manda Bay, Kenya; and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.  In my latest article, I’ve tried to map out these American outposts and the shadow supply network, which the military privately calls “the New Spice Route,” that has been created to service them.  The Pentagon told me that its operations in Africa were small and limited in nature.  My research suggests otherwise.  Check out the full story here. 

Photos: U.S. aircraft, including fighter-bombers, at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.  Thanks Google!

Secret Wars, Secret Bases, and the Pentagon’s “New Spice Route” in Africa

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the Pentagon has set up bases all over Africa, in places like Nzara, South Sudan; Manda Bay, Kenya; and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.  In my latest article, I’ve tried to map out these American outposts and the shadow supply network, which the military privately calls “the New Spice Route,” that has been created to service them.  The Pentagon told me that its operations in Africa were small and limited in nature.  My research suggests otherwise.  Check out the full story here. 

Photos: U.S. aircraft, including fighter-bombers, at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.  Thanks Google!

Secret Wars, Secret Bases, and the Pentagon’s “New Spice Route” in Africa

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the Pentagon has set up bases all over Africa, in places like Nzara, South Sudan; Manda Bay, Kenya; and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.  In my latest article, I’ve tried to map out these American outposts and the shadow supply network, which the military privately calls “the New Spice Route,” that has been created to service them.  The Pentagon told me that its operations in Africa were small and limited in nature.  My research suggests otherwise.  Check out the full story here. 

Photos: U.S. aircraft, including fighter-bombers, at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.  Thanks Google!