Nick Turse
New York Public Radio - REWRITING HISTORY
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For your listening pleasure: I talk to Bob Garfield from WYNC’s On The Media about the Pentagon’s attempt to peddle a counterfeit history of the Vietnam War

For more, read my latest article: “Misremembering America’s Wars, 2003-2053.”

picadorbookroom:

Nick Turse, author of Kill Anything that Moves, at yesterday’s reading and discussion at the New York State Writer’s Institute.(Photo credit: Paul Grondahl, staff writer at Albany Times Union)

I would encourage all authors to jump at the chance to speak here.  A truly great experience!

picadorbookroom:

Nick Turse, author of Kill Anything that Moves, at yesterday’s reading and discussion at the New York State Writer’s Institute.

(Photo credit: Paul Grondahl, staff writer at Albany Times Union)

I would encourage all authors to jump at the chance to speak here.  A truly great experience!

 “The Oriental doesn’t put the same high price on life as does the Westerner,” [U.S. commander, General William] Westmoreland famously said. “Life is plentiful, life is cheap in the Orient.”Having spoken to survivors of massacres by United States forces at Phi Phu, Trieu Ai, My Luoc and so many other hamlets, I can say with certainty that Westmoreland’s assessment was false.Decades after the conflict ended, villagers still mourn loved ones — spouses, parents, children — slain in horrific spasms of violence. They told me, too, about what it was like to live for years under American bombs, artillery shells and helicopter gunships; about what it was like to negotiate every aspect of their lives around the “American war,” as they call it; how the war transformed the most mundane tasks — getting water from a well or relieving oneself or working in the fields or gathering vegetables for a hungry family — into life-or-death decisions; about what it was like to live under United States policies that couldn’t have been more callous or contemptuous toward human life. 
Nick Turse, “For America, Life Was Cheap in Vietnam” - NYTimes.com

 “The Oriental doesn’t put the same high price on life as does the Westerner,” [U.S. commander, General William] Westmoreland famously said. “Life is plentiful, life is cheap in the Orient.”

Having spoken to survivors of massacres by United States forces at Phi Phu, Trieu Ai, My Luoc and so many other hamlets, I can say with certainty that Westmoreland’s assessment was false.

Decades after the conflict ended, villagers still mourn loved ones — spouses, parents, children — slain in horrific spasms of violence. They told me, too, about what it was like to live for years under American bombs, artillery shells and helicopter gunships; about what it was like to negotiate every aspect of their lives around the “American war,” as they call it; how the war transformed the most mundane tasks — getting water from a well or relieving oneself or working in the fields or gathering vegetables for a hungry family — into life-or-death decisions; about what it was like to live under United States policies that couldn’t have been more callous or contemptuous toward human life.

Nick Turse, “For America, Life Was Cheap in Vietnam” - NYTimes.com

The book tour rolls on.  This Friday, come on out to Brooklyn’s legendary Book Court to see me discuss Kill Anything That Moves (just out in paperback with a new afterword) with the whip-smart and always provocative Chase Madar (who reviewed the book for The American Conservative).
When: Friday, January 17th at 7:00PM
Where:  163 Court Street (between Pacific & Dean streets)Brooklyn, USA
Details: http://bookcourt.com/events/nick-turse

The book tour rolls on.  This Friday, come on out to Brooklyn’s legendary Book Court to see me discuss Kill Anything That Moves (just out in paperback with a new afterword) with the whip-smart and always provocative Chase Madar (who reviewed the book for The American Conservative).

When: Friday, January 17th at 7:00PM

Where:  163 Court Street (between Pacific & Dean streets)
Brooklyn, USA

Details: http://bookcourt.com/events/nick-turse

If you’re in Washington, D.C. on January 7th, come on out and see me at Politics and Prose Bookstore at 7pm for a talk, Q&A, and book signing for the new paperback edition of Kill Anything that Moves.
Hope to see you there!
(via Nick Turse - Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam | Politics & Prose Bookstore)

If you’re in Washington, D.C. on January 7th, come on out and see me at Politics and Prose Bookstore at 7pm for a talk, Q&A, and book signing for the new paperback edition of Kill Anything that Moves.

Hope to see you there!

(via Nick Turse - Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam | Politics & Prose Bookstore)

If you’re in Washington, D.C. on January 7th, come on out and see me at Politics and Prose Bookstore at 7pm for a talk, Q&A, and book signing for the new paperback edition of Kill Anything that Moves.
Hope to see you there!
(via Nick Turse - Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam | Politics & Prose Bookstore)

If you’re in Washington, D.C. on January 7th, come on out and see me at Politics and Prose Bookstore at 7pm for a talk, Q&A, and book signing for the new paperback edition of Kill Anything that Moves.

Hope to see you there!

(via Nick Turse - Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam | Politics & Prose Bookstore)

Thanks for the shout out, NPR!
(via New In Paperback: ‘A Tale For The Time Being,’ ‘Wave,’ ‘Kill Anything That Moves’ : NPR)

'The Oriental doesn’t put the same high price on life as does the Westerner,' [U.S. commander, General William] Westmoreland famously said. 'Life is plentiful, life is cheap in the Orient.'

Having spoken to survivors of massacres by United States forces at Phi Phu, Trieu Ai, My Luoc and so many other hamlets, I can say with certainty that Westmoreland’s assessment was false.

Decades after the conflict ended, villagers still mourn loved ones — spouses, parents, children — slain in horrific spasms of violence. They told me, too, about what it was like to live for years under American bombs, artillery shells and helicopter gunships; about what it was like to negotiate every aspect of their lives around the “American war,” as they call it; how the war transformed the most mundane tasks — getting water from a well or relieving oneself or working in the fields or gathering vegetables for a hungry family — into life-or-death decisions; about what it was like to live under United States policies that couldn’t have been more callous or contemptuous toward human life.

Troops in the field regularly carved their unit’s initials or numbers into corpses, adorned bodies with their unit’s patch, or left a “death card”— generally either an ace of spades or a custom- printed business card claiming credit for the kill. Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry of the 198th Light Infantry Brigade, for example, left their victims with a customized ace of spades sporting the unit’s formal designation, its nickname (“Gunfighters”), a skull and crossbones, and the phrase “dealers of death.”

Buy the book:     Also available as an ebook:

Troops in the field regularly carved their unit’s initials or numbers into corpses, adorned bodies with their unit’s patch, or left a “death card”— generally either an ace of spades or a custom- printed business card claiming credit for the kill. Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry of the 198th Light Infantry Brigade, for example, left their victims with a customized ace of spades sporting the unit’s formal designation, its nickname (“Gunfighters”), a skull and crossbones, and the phrase “dealers of death.”

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Buy the book:
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Also available as an ebook:
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Two Vietnamese women struggle to salvage items from their home in Quang Tin Province after it was set on fire by members of the U.S. Army’s 1st Squadron,1st Cavalry, and allied South Vietnamese militia.
© 1970 Richard Brummett

Two Vietnamese women struggle to salvage items from their home in Quang Tin Province after it was set on fire by members of the U.S. Army’s 1st Squadron,1st Cavalry, and allied South Vietnamese militia.

© 1970 Richard Brummett