Nick Turse
Did you know the U.S. military had a secret compound in the African nation of Mali? 
Read the full story here.

Did you know the U.S. military had a secret compound in the African nation of Mali? 

Read the full story here.

Killings, disappearances in Mali’s climate of suspicion 
A new report from the U.N.’s news agency, IRIN, begins: “Seyo Sangho’s husband was arrested by Malian army soldiers at the central market in Konna in central Mali… after getting into an argument with another man. ‘I haven’t seen him since,’ she says. ‘That was 10 days ago.’”
For the full article, click here.

Killings, disappearances in Mali’s climate of suspicion

A new report from the U.N.’s news agency, IRIN, begins: “Seyo Sangho’s husband was arrested by Malian army soldiers at the central market in Konna in central Mali… after getting into an argument with another man. ‘I haven’t seen him since,’ she says. ‘That was 10 days ago.’”

For the full article, click here.

U.S. Plans Base for Surveillance Drones in Africa - NYTimes.com
This “new drone base in northwest Africa would join a constellation of small airstrips in recent years on the continent, including in Ethiopia, for surveillance missions flown by drones or turboprop planes designed to look like civilian aircraft,” writes Eric Schmitt in today’s New York Times.  He continues: “If the base is approved, the most likely location for it would be in Niger, a largely desert nation on the eastern border of Mali. The American military’s Africa Command, or Africom, is also discussing options for the base with other countries in the region, including Burkina Faso, officials said.”

U.S. Plans Base for Surveillance Drones in Africa - NYTimes.com

This “new drone base in northwest Africa would join a constellation of small airstrips in recent years on the continent, including in Ethiopia, for surveillance missions flown by drones or turboprop planes designed to look like civilian aircraft,” writes Eric Schmitt in today’s New York Times.  He continues: “If the base is approved, the most likely location for it would be in Niger, a largely desert nation on the eastern border of Mali. The American military’s Africa Command, or Africom, is also discussing options for the base with other countries in the region, including Burkina Faso, officials said.”

Civilians return to battle-scarred Malian town of Diabaly 
The United Nations’ news service, IRIN, reports on the return of civilians to the Malian town of Diabaly following its capture by Islamist forces and subsequent air strikes by French forces.
“I no longer recognize Diabaly. Everywhere you look there are burnt-out cars and tanks, destroyed buildings, the stadium has been completely destroyed, frontless shops have been looted,” resident Mariam Sissoko told IRIN.

Civilians return to battle-scarred Malian town of Diabaly

The United Nations’ news service, IRIN, reports on the return of civilians to the Malian town of Diabaly following its capture by Islamist forces and subsequent air strikes by French forces.

“I no longer recognize Diabaly. Everywhere you look there are burnt-out cars and tanks, destroyed buildings, the stadium has been completely destroyed, frontless shops have been looted,” resident Mariam Sissoko told IRIN.

An understated but devastating article by the always insightful Walter Pincus!

As French military air strikes continued for the sixth day, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) estimates that at least 30,000 Malians have fled their homes, according to a report by the U.N.’s news agency, IRIN.
(via IRIN Africa | Fear, rumour and relief as air strikes continue in Mali |

As French military air strikes continued for the sixth day, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) estimates that at least 30,000 Malians have fled their homes, according to a report by the U.N.’s news agency, IRIN.

(via IRIN Africa | Fear, rumour and relief as air strikes continue in Mali |

Secret Wars, Secret Bases, and the Pentagon’s “New Spice Route” in Africa

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the Pentagon has set up bases all over Africa, in places like Nzara, South Sudan; Manda Bay, Kenya; and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.  In my latest article, I’ve tried to map out these American outposts and the shadow supply network, which the military privately calls “the New Spice Route,” that has been created to service them.  The Pentagon told me that its operations in Africa were small and limited in nature.  My research suggests otherwise.  Check out the full story here. 

Photos: U.S. aircraft, including fighter-bombers, at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.  Thanks Google!

Secret Wars, Secret Bases, and the Pentagon’s “New Spice Route” in Africa

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the Pentagon has set up bases all over Africa, in places like Nzara, South Sudan; Manda Bay, Kenya; and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.  In my latest article, I’ve tried to map out these American outposts and the shadow supply network, which the military privately calls “the New Spice Route,” that has been created to service them.  The Pentagon told me that its operations in Africa were small and limited in nature.  My research suggests otherwise.  Check out the full story here. 

Photos: U.S. aircraft, including fighter-bombers, at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.  Thanks Google!

Secret Wars, Secret Bases, and the Pentagon’s “New Spice Route” in Africa

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the Pentagon has set up bases all over Africa, in places like Nzara, South Sudan; Manda Bay, Kenya; and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.  In my latest article, I’ve tried to map out these American outposts and the shadow supply network, which the military privately calls “the New Spice Route,” that has been created to service them.  The Pentagon told me that its operations in Africa were small and limited in nature.  My research suggests otherwise.  Check out the full story here. 

Photos: U.S. aircraft, including fighter-bombers, at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.  Thanks Google!

Secret Wars, Secret Bases, and the Pentagon’s “New Spice Route” in Africa

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the Pentagon has set up bases all over Africa, in places like Nzara, South Sudan; Manda Bay, Kenya; and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.  In my latest article, I’ve tried to map out these American outposts and the shadow supply network, which the military privately calls “the New Spice Route,” that has been created to service them.  The Pentagon told me that its operations in Africa were small and limited in nature.  My research suggests otherwise.  Check out the full story here. 

Photos: U.S. aircraft, including fighter-bombers, at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.  Thanks Google!