Nick Turse
A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.
Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.
The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.) 
For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.

Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

A billion dollars from the federal government could go a long way toward revitalizing America’s aging infrastructure.  It could provide housing or better water and sewer systems.  It could enhance a transportation network or develop an urban waterfront.  It could provide local jobs.  It could do any or all of these things.  And, in fact, it did.  It just happened to be in the Middle East, not the United States.

The Pentagon awarded $667.2 million in contracts in 2012, and more than $1 billion during Barack Obama’s first term in office for construction projects in largely autocratic Middle Eastern nations, according to figures provided to me by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Middle East District.  (More than $178 million in similar funding is already anticipated for 2013.)

For more on the Mid-East building boom of the Obama years, check out my latest article here.


Photo: U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Adam Ereli (fourth from left) and other U.S. and Bahraini officials begin a $580 million military construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony at Mina Salman Port.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Brown/RELEASED)

Iranian ships participate in a naval parade on the last day of the  Velayat-90 war game on the Sea of Oman near the Strait of Hormuz in  southern Iran, January 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jamejamonline/Ebrahim Norouzi

Iranian ships participate in a naval parade on the last day of the Velayat-90 war game on the Sea of Oman near the Strait of Hormuz in southern Iran, January 3, 2012.
REUTERS/Jamejamonline/Ebrahim Norouzi

Protesters demonstrate at the Sohar roundabout monument in Oman’s northern city of Sohar.
Credit: Eric Bouvet/VII

Protesters demonstrate at the Sohar roundabout monument in Oman’s northern city of Sohar.

Credit: Eric Bouvet/VII

thepoliticalnotebook:

Higher education and internet connectivity across North Africa and the Middle East. See more of these lovely pencil drawn maps of the Middle East by Philippe Rekacewicz at Le Monde Diplo.

thepoliticalnotebook:

Higher education and internet connectivity across North Africa and the Middle East. See more of these lovely pencil drawn maps of the Middle East by Philippe Rekacewicz at Le Monde Diplo.

U.S. Wavers on ‘Regime Change’ in Middle East - WSJ.com
Adam Entous and Julian Barnes of the Wall Street Journal write:
"Instead of pushing for immediate regime change—as it did to varying  degrees in Egypt and now Libya—the U.S. is urging protesters from  Bahrain to Morocco to work with existing rulers toward what some  officials and diplomats are now calling ‘regime alteration.’"
Typical.
Photo: A fighter for the Libyan  rebels prepares for battle Friday against forces loyal to Col. Moammar  Gadhafi, on a day when the two sides waged a fierce battle near Tripoli.  Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Wavers on ‘Regime Change’ in Middle East - WSJ.com

Adam Entous and Julian Barnes of the Wall Street Journal write:

"Instead of pushing for immediate regime change—as it did to varying degrees in Egypt and now Libya—the U.S. is urging protesters from Bahrain to Morocco to work with existing rulers toward what some officials and diplomats are now calling ‘regime alteration.’"

Typical.

Photo: A fighter for the Libyan rebels prepares for battle Friday against forces loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi, on a day when the two sides waged a fierce battle near Tripoli.  Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images

thepoliticalnotebook:

Sohar, Oman. February 28, 2011. Omani protesters demanding jobs and reform gather at the Sohar roundabout monument. Photo Credit: Karim SahibAFP/Getty Images)

thepoliticalnotebook:

Sohar, Oman. February 28, 2011. Omani protesters demanding jobs and reform gather at the Sohar roundabout monument. Photo Credit: Karim SahibAFP/Getty Images)


The price of food is at the heart of this wave of revolutions
Peter Popham of The Independent writes:
"Nowhere is immune to this wave of rebellion because globalisation is a  fact; all the world’s markets are intricately interlinked, and woe in  one place quickly translates into fury in another. Twenty years ago,  things were more manageable. When grain production collapsed in the  Soviet Union during the 1980s and what had been one of the world’s  greatest grain exporters became a net importer, the resulting surges of  anger brought down the whole Communist system within a couple of years –  but stopped there. Today there are no such firebreaks, and thanks to  digital communications, events happen much faster."

The price of food is at the heart of this wave of revolutions

Peter Popham of The Independent writes:

"Nowhere is immune to this wave of rebellion because globalisation is a fact; all the world’s markets are intricately interlinked, and woe in one place quickly translates into fury in another. Twenty years ago, things were more manageable. When grain production collapsed in the Soviet Union during the 1980s and what had been one of the world’s greatest grain exporters became a net importer, the resulting surges of anger brought down the whole Communist system within a couple of years – but stopped there. Today there are no such firebreaks, and thanks to digital communications, events happen much faster."