Nick Turse
In this Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012 photo, Syrian residents walk on a street among the debris of buildings shattered by heavy shelling in Tarik Al-Bab neighborhood, southeast of Aleppo City. 
(AP Photo/Narciso Contreras).

In this Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012 photo, Syrian residents walk on a street among the debris of buildings shattered by heavy shelling in Tarik Al-Bab neighborhood, southeast of Aleppo City.

(AP Photo/Narciso Contreras).

LIFE magazine captioned this as an “American twin-jet F-4C Phantom heading toward tiny riverside village known to be an important Vietcong site to bomb it during Vietnam War.”  The problem of course is that all these villages that were “Vietcong strongholds”were filled with civilians — women, children, old men — who lost homes, limbs, and lives to American rockets.
 Photographer:    Larry Burrows, 1966

LIFE magazine captioned this as an “American twin-jet F-4C Phantom heading toward tiny riverside village known to be an important Vietcong site to bomb it during Vietnam War.”  The problem of course is that all these villages that were “Vietcong strongholds”were filled with civilians — women, children, old men — who lost homes, limbs, and lives to American rockets.


Photographer:    Larry Burrows, 1966

LIFE magazine captioned this as “American F-4C Phantom jet firing rockets into small village known to be an important Vietcong stronghold during the Vietnam War.”  The problem of course is that these villages that were “Vietcong strongholds”were also filled with civilians — women, children, old men — who lost homes, limbs, and lives to American rockets and bombs.
Location:    Vietnam Date taken:    1966 Photographer:    Larry Burrows

LIFE magazine captioned this as “American F-4C Phantom jet firing rockets into small village known to be an important Vietcong stronghold during the Vietnam War.”  The problem of course is that these villages that were “Vietcong strongholds”were also filled with civilians — women, children, old men — who lost homes, limbs, and lives to American rockets and bombs.

Location:    Vietnam
Date taken:    1966
Photographer:    Larry Burrows

 Air War In Vietnam
LIFE magazine captioned this as “Thatched huts suspected of housing Viet Cong burn after they were napalm bombed by American planes during the Vietnam War.”  “Thatched huts” in villages sometimes housed “Viet Cong,” but almost always also housed women, children, and old men.
 Location:    Vietnam Date taken:    1966 Photographer:    Larry Burrows

Air War In Vietnam

LIFE magazine captioned this as “Thatched huts suspected of housing Viet Cong burn after they were napalm bombed by American planes during the Vietnam War.”  “Thatched huts” in villages sometimes housed “Viet Cong,” but almost always also housed women, children, and old men.


Location:    Vietnam
Date taken:    1966
Photographer:    Larry Burrows

In this Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 photo, an apartment shattered by tank shelling is viewed at the top level of one house building in Karmal Jabl neighborhood after several days of intense clashes between rebel fighters and the Syrian army in Aleppo City. 
(AP Photo/Narciso Contreras)

In this Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 photo, an apartment shattered by tank shelling is viewed at the top level of one house building in Karmal Jabl neighborhood after several days of intense clashes between rebel fighters and the Syrian army in Aleppo City.

(AP Photo/Narciso Contreras)

globalpost:

Central African Republic rebels halted their advance toward the nation’s capital and agreed to talks on Wednesday.

The Seleka rebel fighters, who have captured large swathes of the country and threatened to oust President Francois Bozize, said they would not attack the capital city of Bangui, according to Reuters.

PHOTOS: Central African Republic rebels agree to talks as troops from Chad block advance

nickturse:

By the mid-1970s,Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s time-sharing system, Octopus, was the world’s most powerful research computer facility. It included four CDC 7600s (each with the power of 5,000 UNIVACs, about 10 million operations per second) and two CDC STARs. The computers were time-shared by users at more than 1,000 remote workstations around the Laboratory, many connected to television monitor display systems.
Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr

nickturse:

By the mid-1970s,Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s time-sharing system, Octopus, was the world’s most powerful research computer facility. It included four CDC 7600s (each with the power of 5,000 UNIVACs, about 10 million operations per second) and two CDC STARs. The computers were time-shared by users at more than 1,000 remote workstations around the Laboratory, many connected to television monitor display systems.

Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr

nickturse:

The National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center was formed in 1974 under the name Controlled Thermonuclear Research Center to meet the significant computational demands national magnetic fusion research being done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In 1983 the center’s role was expanded to include the full range of national energy research programs. The name later changed to the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) and moved to Berkeley. The center first ran on CDC-7600 machines. In 1978, the Center acquired one of the first Cray I’s, followed by a series of ever more powerful Crays.
Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr

nickturse:

The National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center was formed in 1974 under the name Controlled Thermonuclear Research Center to meet the significant computational demands national magnetic fusion research being done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In 1983 the center’s role was expanded to include the full range of national energy research programs. The name later changed to the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) and moved to Berkeley. The center first ran on CDC-7600 machines. In 1978, the Center acquired one of the first Cray I’s, followed by a series of ever more powerful Crays.

Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr

The National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center’s computer room atLawrence Livermore National Laboratory shows a line of Cray machines, the X-MP in front and Cray 1’s in back. The first X-MPs arrived at the Lab in 1984.
Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr

The National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center’s computer room atLawrence Livermore National Laboratory shows a line of Cray machines, the X-MP in front and Cray 1’s in back. The first X-MPs arrived at the Lab in 1984.

Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr

By the mid-1970s,Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s time-sharing system, Octopus, was the world’s most powerful research computer facility. It included four CDC 7600s (each with the power of 5,000 UNIVACs, about 10 million operations per second) and two CDC STARs. The computers were time-shared by users at more than 1,000 remote workstations around the Laboratory, many connected to television monitor display systems.
Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr

By the mid-1970s,Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s time-sharing system, Octopus, was the world’s most powerful research computer facility. It included four CDC 7600s (each with the power of 5,000 UNIVACs, about 10 million operations per second) and two CDC STARs. The computers were time-shared by users at more than 1,000 remote workstations around the Laboratory, many connected to television monitor display systems.

Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Flickr