Nick Turse

Press freedom rankings from the Newseum and Freedom House

The most free?  Finland, Norway and Sweden.  The least?  North Korea.  Where does the U.S. rank?  Find out here at the Newseum’s website.

As Marie Colvin Is Laid To Rest, News Organizations Assess The Dangers Of Reporting From Inside Syria (Capital New York)

The Associated Press’ George Esper — one of the most tenacious reporters on the planet and the star of too many Vietnam War correspondents’ “scoop stories” to count — has died. He was 79.

RIP

newsweek:

futurejournalismproject:

NY Police Restrict Press Access say News Orgs
Twelve news organizations joined the New York Times in criticizing the New York Police Department for its treatment of journalists covering the Occupy Wall Street Movement and other newsworthy events.
In a joint letter Wednesday they write (PDF):

There have been other reports of police officers using a variety of tactics ranging from inappropriate orders directed at some journalists to physical interference with others, who were covering newsworthy sites and events. Indeed, as recently as this Monday it was reported (attached) that at another OWS demonstration, police “officers blocked the lens of a newspaper photographer attempting to document the arrests.” As a result, a number of press entities feel that more needs to be done if we are to resolve these issues in an amicable manner.

According to The Atlantic Wire:
The police’s interference with the press extends past Occupy protests, the organizations say. An inspector threatened New York Daily News photographer David Handschuh at last year’s Macy’s Day parade, the National Press Photographers Association writes, and another Daily News reporter had his press credentials pulled while covering a fire in December, Capital New York reported.
In response, Deputy Commissioner Paul Brown told The Atlantic Wire that 1,600 new officers have received media training with an emphasis on 1st Amendment Protections.
Image: Co-signatures of a New York Times letter to the the NYPD. Via Capital New York (PDF).

nwk tumblr co-signs.

newsweek:

futurejournalismproject:

NY Police Restrict Press Access say News Orgs

Twelve news organizations joined the New York Times in criticizing the New York Police Department for its treatment of journalists covering the Occupy Wall Street Movement and other newsworthy events.

In a joint letter Wednesday they write (PDF):

There have been other reports of police officers using a variety of tactics ranging from inappropriate orders directed at some journalists to physical interference with others, who were covering newsworthy sites and events. Indeed, as recently as this Monday it was reported (attached) that at another OWS demonstration, police “officers blocked the lens of a newspaper photographer attempting to document the arrests.” As a result, a number of press entities feel that more needs to be done if we are to resolve these issues in an amicable manner.

According to The Atlantic Wire:

The police’s interference with the press extends past Occupy protests, the organizations say. An inspector threatened New York Daily News photographer David Handschuh at last year’s Macy’s Day parade, the National Press Photographers Association writes, and another Daily News reporter had his press credentials pulled while covering a fire in December, Capital New York reported.

In response, Deputy Commissioner Paul Brown told The Atlantic Wire that 1,600 new officers have received media training with an emphasis on 1st Amendment Protections.

Image: Co-signatures of a New York Times letter to the the NYPD. Via Capital New York (PDF).

nwk tumblr co-signs.

Joe Pompeo at Capital New York explores the origin of the most famous headline in New York City tabloid history: “Headless Body In Topless Bar.”
It appeared on the front page of the New York Post (see above) in 1983 after a gunman killed the owner of a strip club in Queens and then forced one of the patrons to cut off the victim’s head.

Joe Pompeo at Capital New York explores the origin of the most famous headline in New York City tabloid history: “Headless Body In Topless Bar.”

It appeared on the front page of the New York Post (see above) in 1983 after a gunman killed the owner of a strip club in Queens and then forced one of the patrons to cut off the victim’s head.

Joe Pompeo at Capital New York explores the origin of the most famous headline in New York City tabloid history: “Headless Body In Topless Bar.”
It appeared on the front page of the New York Post (see above) in 1983 after a gunman killed the owner of a strip club in Queens and then forced one of the patrons to cut off the victim’s head.

Joe Pompeo at Capital New York explores the origin of the most famous headline in New York City tabloid history: “Headless Body In Topless Bar.”

It appeared on the front page of the New York Post (see above) in 1983 after a gunman killed the owner of a strip club in Queens and then forced one of the patrons to cut off the victim’s head.

Janet Paskin opines on condition I’ve puzzled over and am afflicted by.  Why does print still retain the allure it does and when will it end?

If not for Eric Alterman’s smart new Columbia Journalism Review piece, “The Girl Who Loved Journalists,” I might have been too ashamed to admit that as I watched David Fincher’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (as with the three previous Swedish film adaptations of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy), I spent an inordinate amount of time marveling at the research skills of the “Girl,”  Lisbeth Salander, and the somewhat peripheral issues of journalism that are addressed in the movie.
As Salander unraveled murders in no time flat, I thought back to how long it took me to do the research to expose long-secret massacres and other mass killings of civilians or the number of secret U.S. drone bases or how the Pentagon arms Mid-East despots and sighed more than once.
But it seems I’m not alone in focusing on the journalism. As Alterman astutely observes:

The trilogy’s plot… frequently turns on matters of journalistic propriety of the  kind that are rarely discussed outside badly lit newsroom cafeterias and  gloomy university seminar rooms. We see Mikael and Erica [Berger, Blomkvist’s lover, best friend, and editor] struggle with  love and danger, but also with questions of proper sourcing in a  magazine article versus a book, a little magazine versus a powerful (and  compromised) newspaper. We see the drudgery of research, of  interviewing sources, and building a story one detail at a time; of  trying to figure out who’s lying and why, how to publish what one knows  without giving away what one doesn’t, and then how to manipulate the  numbskullery of television to build the biggest echo chamber possible  for one’s work.

Alterman’s piece is filled with other intelligent observations about the power of money in journalism and how most of us who report don’t have much of it.  I could go on, but you’d be better off reading the whole article here.

If not for Eric Alterman’s smart new Columbia Journalism Review piece, “The Girl Who Loved Journalists,” I might have been too ashamed to admit that as I watched David Fincher’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (as with the three previous Swedish film adaptations of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy), I spent an inordinate amount of time marveling at the research skills of the “Girl,” Lisbeth Salander, and the somewhat peripheral issues of journalism that are addressed in the movie.

As Salander unraveled murders in no time flat, I thought back to how long it took me to do the research to expose long-secret massacres and other mass killings of civilians or the number of secret U.S. drone bases or how the Pentagon arms Mid-East despots and sighed more than once.

But it seems I’m not alone in focusing on the journalism. As Alterman astutely observes:

The trilogy’s plot… frequently turns on matters of journalistic propriety of the kind that are rarely discussed outside badly lit newsroom cafeterias and gloomy university seminar rooms. We see Mikael and Erica [Berger, Blomkvist’s lover, best friend, and editor] struggle with love and danger, but also with questions of proper sourcing in a magazine article versus a book, a little magazine versus a powerful (and compromised) newspaper. We see the drudgery of research, of interviewing sources, and building a story one detail at a time; of trying to figure out who’s lying and why, how to publish what one knows without giving away what one doesn’t, and then how to manipulate the numbskullery of television to build the biggest echo chamber possible for one’s work.

Alterman’s piece is filled with other intelligent observations about the power of money in journalism and how most of us who report don’t have much of it.  I could go on, but you’d be better off reading the whole article here.