Nick Turse
[T]he press is not supposed to be cozy with the powerful. Journalists are supposed to be a check on power, and that means not being afraid to be adversarial when needed: to dig out the truth when people don’t want us to, to state it clearly and let the chips fall where they may.

—  New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan, from Lodestars in a Murky Media World - NYTimes.com

Real journalists are not for sale, not for insider access, a free lunch or the prospect of a future book contract. The best journalism is about truth-seeking and truth-telling; it’s meant to serve the public… the press is not supposed to be cozy with the powerful. Journalists are supposed to be a check on power, and that means not being afraid to be adversarial when needed: to dig out the truth when people don’t want us to, to state it clearly and let the chips fall where they may.
New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan, from Lodestars in a Murky Media World - NYTimes.com
Yes, Marcus. Your friends died in vain.
Jim Gourley from “The Best Defense” at Foreign Policy responding to former Navy SEAL and Lone Survivor author Marcus Luttrell who asked “We spend our whole lives training to defend this country, and then we were sent over there by this country, and you’re telling me because we were over there doing what we were told by our country that it was senseless and my guys died for nothing?”
The past guides us; the future needs us.
Martin Luther King studied Thoreau and Gandhi and put their ideas to work in the United States, while in 1952 the African National Congress and the young Nelson Mandela were collaborating with the South African Indian Congress on civil disobedience campaigns. You wish you could write Thoreau a letter about all this. He had no way of knowing that what he planted would still be bearing fruit 151 years after his death. But the past doesn’t need us. The past guides us; the future needs us.
randomhouse:


“Do not read, as children do, to amuse yourself, or like the ambitious, for the purpose of instruction. No, read in order to live.” 

                                                                           ―Gustave Flaubert

randomhouse:

“Do not read, as children do, to amuse yourself, or like the ambitious, for the purpose of instruction. No, read in order to live.” 

                                                                           ―Gustave Flaubert

Anyone who isn’t confused really doesn’t understand the situation.
Edward R. Murrow  (via journolist)
randomhouse:

Banned Books Week 2012
Have you read any of these frequently banned Judy Blume books?
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret
Blubber
Then Again, Maybe I Won’t

randomhouse:

Banned Books Week 2012

Have you read any of these frequently banned Judy Blume books?

I’m sure you have been following the dust up over government officials demanding that news organizations permit them to clear their quotes .

Frankly, I’m not sure why there is a controversy. Our policy and common sense dictate that we don’t allow public officials to edit NJ coverage.

A quotation is just as important as any other paragraph in your story. If not, you wouldn’t include it.

So how is ceding control of an interview or quote any different than letting a press secretary edit any other paragraph? The entire story? All your stories? It’s not. Don’t do it.

If a public official wants to use NJ as a platform for his/her point of view, the price of admission is a quote that is on-record, unedited and unadulterated. Proposed exceptions can be discussed case-by-case with your editor.

We can’t hold leaders accountable while allowing them to pull our punches.

‎Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires. - John Steinbeck.
(via penamerican)