Nick Turse
America’s Non-Stop Military Ops in Africa
The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.
Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”? (via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

America’s Non-Stop Military Ops in Africa

The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.

Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”?

(via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

Mick Deane 
Sky News
Killed on August 14, 2013, in Cairo, Egypt 
Sky News cameraman Mick Deane was shot and killed as Egyptian security forces stormed a sit-in demonstration at Rabaa Adawiya, in Nasr City, Cairo, on the morning of Wednesday, Aug, 14. The demonstrators were supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood. Around 149 people were killed in clashes in the capital and ensuing violence around the country, the Egyptian Health Ministry said, according to news reports. The Muslim Brotherhood said the death toll was much higher.

Deane, 61, had worked for Sky for 15 years, based in Washington, D.C., and then Jerusalem, the network reported. He had been covering the clashes in Egypt with Sky’s Middle East correspondent, Sam Kiley. None of the other team members were hurt, the broadcaster said.

The BBC reported that Deane was born in Hannover, Germany. The Washington Post said he was the husband of former Post reporter Daniela Deane and that the couple have two sons.
(via Mick Deane - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)

Mick Deane

Sky News

Killed on August 14, 2013, in Cairo, Egypt

Sky News cameraman Mick Deane was shot and killed as Egyptian security forces stormed a sit-in demonstration at Rabaa Adawiya, in Nasr City, Cairo, on the morning of Wednesday, Aug, 14. The demonstrators were supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood. Around 149 people were killed in clashes in the capital and ensuing violence around the country, the Egyptian Health Ministry said, according to news reports. The Muslim Brotherhood said the death toll was much higher.

Deane, 61, had worked for Sky for 15 years, based in Washington, D.C., and then Jerusalem, the network reported. He had been covering the clashes in Egypt with Sky’s Middle East correspondent, Sam Kiley. None of the other team members were hurt, the broadcaster said.

The BBC reported that Deane was born in Hannover, Germany. The Washington Post said he was the husband of former Post reporter Daniela Deane and that the couple have two sons.

(via Mick Deane - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)

Mohamed Mohamud 
Universal TV
Killed on October 26, 2013, in Mogadishu, Somalia 
Unidentified gunmen shot Universal TV reporter Mohamed Mohamud, 26, outside of his home on October 22, 2013, in Wadajir district of the capital, Mogadishu, local journalists told CPJ. He was shot six times in the neck, chest, and shoulder as he drove to work, the journalists said. Mohamed, also known as “Tima’ade,” died of internal bleeding around 10:30 p.m on October 26.

Mohamed was an outspoken reporter who often covered social and security issues in Mogadishu, local journalists said. It’s not clear who carried out the attack, although a Twitter account claiming to represent the Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab claimed responsibility for the shooting. Local journalists could not pinpoint one particular report by the U.K.-based, privately owned broadcaster that may have led to the attack, but said Mohamed had received text message threats in the past by suspected Al-Shabaab militiamen.

Mohamed is survived by a wife and daughter.
(via Mohamed Mohamud - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)

Mohamed Mohamud

Universal TV

Killed on October 26, 2013, in Mogadishu, Somalia

Unidentified gunmen shot Universal TV reporter Mohamed Mohamud, 26, outside of his home on October 22, 2013, in Wadajir district of the capital, Mogadishu, local journalists told CPJ. He was shot six times in the neck, chest, and shoulder as he drove to work, the journalists said. Mohamed, also known as “Tima’ade,” died of internal bleeding around 10:30 p.m on October 26.

Mohamed was an outspoken reporter who often covered social and security issues in Mogadishu, local journalists said. It’s not clear who carried out the attack, although a Twitter account claiming to represent the Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab claimed responsibility for the shooting. Local journalists could not pinpoint one particular report by the U.K.-based, privately owned broadcaster that may have led to the attack, but said Mohamed had received text message threats in the past by suspected Al-Shabaab militiamen.

Mohamed is survived by a wife and daughter.

(via Mohamed Mohamud - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)

Molhem Barakat
Freelance journalist
Killed on December 20, 2013, in Aleppo, Syria
Barakat, a freelance photographer who published with Reuters, was killed during a rebel assault on Kindi Hospital, a regime position in the northern city of Aleppo, The Associated Press reported. Reuters said he had submitted dozens of photos since he started working with the agency in May 2013.

The rebel assault on the hospital, which rebels said had been turned into a government barracks, began with two suicide bombers attacking the building, news reports said. The opposition Aleppo Media Center told AP that Barakat was killed in the fighting while in a nearby carpet factory. His brother, a rebel fighter, was also killed in the factory. The Aleppo Media Center later posted a picture of Barakat’s bloodied camera.
There were conflicting reports on Barakat’s age, ranging from 17 to 19. Barb Burg, Reuter’s global head of communications, told CPJ that Barakat was born on March 8, 1995, making him 18 when he began submitting photos to Reuters. The same birthdate is listed on his Facebook profile, according to a screenshot acquired by CPJ. Burg said that he was not on assignment for Reuters, but he sent photos to the agency on an ad hoc basis. 
(via Molhem Barakat - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)
Molhem Barakat

Freelance journalist

Killed on December 20, 2013, in Aleppo, Syria

Barakat, a freelance photographer who published with Reuters, was killed during a rebel assault on Kindi Hospital, a regime position in the northern city of Aleppo, The Associated Press reported. Reuters said he had submitted dozens of photos since he started working with the agency in May 2013.

The rebel assault on the hospital, which rebels said had been turned into a government barracks, began with two suicide bombers attacking the building, news reports said. The opposition Aleppo Media Center told AP that Barakat was killed in the fighting while in a nearby carpet factory. His brother, a rebel fighter, was also killed in the factory. The Aleppo Media Center later posted a picture of Barakat’s bloodied camera.

There were conflicting reports on Barakat’s age, ranging from 17 to 19. Barb Burg, Reuter’s global head of communications, told CPJ that Barakat was born on March 8, 1995, making him 18 when he began submitting photos to Reuters. The same birthdate is listed on his Facebook profile, according to a screenshot acquired by CPJ. Burg said that he was not on assignment for Reuters, but he sent photos to the agency on an ad hoc basis.

(via Molhem Barakat - Journalists Killed - Committee to Protect Journalists)

McClatchy offers this is a list of the journalists acknowledged to be missing in Syria. (Others are known to be missing, but their families have asked that details not be released.)

Austin Tice, American, missing since Aug. 13, 2012, Damascus province

Bashar al Kadumi, Jordanian, missing since Aug. 20, 2012, Aleppo

James Foley, American, missing since Nov. 22, 2012, Idlib province

Didier Francois, French, missing since June 6, 2013, Aleppo

Edouard Elias, French, missing since June 6, 2013, Aleppo

Nicolas Hénin, French, missing since June 22, Raqqa province

Pierre Torres, French, missing since June 22, Raqqa Province

Marc Marginedas, Spaniard, missing since Sept. 4, 2013, Hama province

Javier Espinosa, Spaniard, missing since Sept. 16, 2013, Raqqa province

Ricardo Garcia Vilanova, Spaniard, missing since Sept. 16, 2013, Raqqa province

Samir Kassab, Lebanese, missing since Oct. 15, 2013, Aleppo

Ishak Moctar, Mauritanian, missing since Oct. 15, 2013, Aleppo

with the U.S. Army.  For  more on this evolving turf war, see the latest from the always insightful Rajiv Chandrasekaran: “Army’s ‘Pacific Pathways’ initiative sets up turf battle with Marines” in The Washington Post

"Two hundred and eleven journalists are in jail around the world, the second-worst year on record since the Committee to Protect Journalists began its annual census in 1990… Turkey was the world’s leading jailer of journalists for the second year running, closely followed by Iran and China. Altogether, the three countries accounted for more than half of all reporters behind bars in 2013."

Scripps Howard News Service, which distributed syndicated stories to newspapers across the U.S. since World War I, plans to shut down, becoming just the latest casualty in the long-suffering media biz.

Today my helmet is a veil, and my flak jacket a hijab. Because the only way to sneak into Aleppo is by looking like a Syrian.
A rave review of Ann Jones’ new book, They Were Soldiers: How the Wounded Return from America’s Wars by David Swanson. I’m proud to have had a small role in bringing this book into being and urge you pick up a copy. It’s an absolutely amazing piece of reporting that takes you from the front lines in Afghanistan (where Jones was a 73-year-old embed) to hospitals there and in Germany, to ultimately, the USA, where veterans struggle to remake their shattered lives. Swanson calls the book “devastating” and says “Know a young person considering joining the military? Give them this book.” I couldn’t agree more! 
You can buy the book here and here.

A rave review of Ann Jones’ new book, They Were Soldiers: How the Wounded Return from America’s Wars by David Swanson. I’m proud to have had a small role in bringing this book into being and urge you pick up a copy. It’s an absolutely amazing piece of reporting that takes you from the front lines in Afghanistan (where Jones was a 73-year-old embed) to hospitals there and in Germany, to ultimately, the USA, where veterans struggle to remake their shattered lives. Swanson calls the book “devastating” and says “Know a young person considering joining the military? Give them this book.” I couldn’t agree more!

You can buy the book here and here.