Nick Turse
America’s Non-Stop Military Ops in Africa
The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.
Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”? (via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

America’s Non-Stop Military Ops in Africa

The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.

Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”?

(via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.
Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”? (via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.

Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”?

(via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

New York Public Radio - REWRITING HISTORY
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For your listening pleasure: I talk to Bob Garfield from WYNC’s On The Media about the Pentagon’s attempt to peddle a counterfeit history of the Vietnam War

For more, read my latest article: “Misremembering America’s Wars, 2003-2053.”

"Two hundred and eleven journalists are in jail around the world, the second-worst year on record since the Committee to Protect Journalists began its annual census in 1990… Turkey was the world’s leading jailer of journalists for the second year running, closely followed by Iran and China. Altogether, the three countries accounted for more than half of all reporters behind bars in 2013."

Investigating Investigative Journalism

John Oliver discovers that pretend news is the media world’s sole remaining home for intrepid investigative journalists.

On Cable News, ‘Torture’ Is a Dirty Word 
TVNewser reports on a survey of media coverage by the organization “Covering Torture  that suggests “cable news channels are far more likely to avoid the word torture in their coverage of world events, and instead use less offensive euphemisms for the practice, at least when applied to the U.S. government.”  CNN and Fox News Channel used euphemisms 78% and 79% of the time, respectively, while MSNBC was split evenly 50/50.

On Cable News, ‘Torture’ Is a Dirty Word

TVNewser reports on a survey of media coverage by the organization “Covering Torture  that suggests “cable news channels are far more likely to avoid the word torture in their coverage of world events, and instead use less offensive euphemisms for the practice, at least when applied to the U.S. government.”  CNN and Fox News Channel used euphemisms 78% and 79% of the time, respectively, while MSNBC was split evenly 50/50.

How do you pack your bag for a seven-year, 22,000-mile international reporting assignment? 
Talk about an ambitious effort!  Next month, Paul Salopek — a two-time Pulitzer winner who has covered wars from the Balkans and Somalia to Afghanistan and Iraq — will “begin a seven-year reporting assignment that will take him 22,000 miles (give or take) on foot, from Africa across Asia and the United States, ultimately ending up in Patagonia at the southern tip of South America,” according to Nieman Journalism Lab.
"The route Salopek is following is the one anthropologists believe was the first path humans took out of Africa to populate the rest of the world. He’s calling it the Out of Eden, a narrative trek that will examine the current state of the cultures Salopek visits, while also writing about their history and connection to the greater world.”

How do you pack your bag for a seven-year, 22,000-mile international reporting assignment?

Talk about an ambitious effort!  Next month, Paul Salopek — a two-time Pulitzer winner who has covered wars from the Balkans and Somalia to Afghanistan and Iraq — will “begin a seven-year reporting assignment that will take him 22,000 miles (give or take) on foot, from Africa across Asia and the United States, ultimately ending up in Patagonia at the southern tip of South America,” according to Nieman Journalism Lab.

"The route Salopek is following is the one anthropologists believe was the first path humans took out of Africa to populate the rest of the world. He’s calling it the Out of Eden, a narrative trek that will examine the current state of the cultures Salopek visits, while also writing about their history and connection to the greater world.”

"It’s been a cruel year for the fabled crew of reporters that covered the Vietnam War for The Associated Press," begins a nice remembrance by the AP of its iconic Vietnam War combat correspondents that have passed away this year. Correspondent George Esper died in February, reporter Roy Essoyan a month later, legendary photographer Horst Faas passed away in May, and renowned reporter Malcolm Browne died on Monday.  "Their deaths represent the slipping away of a generation of war reporters that brought the reality of the conflict to the living rooms of America in unprecedented detail and horrifying close-up," the AP notes.  They and their colleagues were pioneers of combat reporting and inspired so many of the great reporters that have followed in their footsteps.
Photo: Malcolm Browne with South Vietnamese troops (AP)

"It’s been a cruel year for the fabled crew of reporters that covered the Vietnam War for The Associated Press," begins a nice remembrance by the AP of its iconic Vietnam War combat correspondents that have passed away this year. Correspondent George Esper died in February, reporter Roy Essoyan a month later, legendary photographer Horst Faas passed away in May, and renowned reporter Malcolm Browne died on Monday.  "Their deaths represent the slipping away of a generation of war reporters that brought the reality of the conflict to the living rooms of America in unprecedented detail and horrifying close-up," the AP notes.  They and their colleagues were pioneers of combat reporting and inspired so many of the great reporters that have followed in their footsteps.

Photo: Malcolm Browne with South Vietnamese troops (AP)

Vietnam war reporter Malcolm Browne dies

The journalist who captured an iconic image of a burning South Vietnamese monk in 1963 has died at the age of 81, according to the BBC

He was one of the greats.  An incredible reporter in every sense.  RIP

Read more here.

Press freedom rankings from the Newseum and Freedom House

The most free?  Finland, Norway and Sweden.  The least?  North Korea.  Where does the U.S. rank?  Find out here at the Newseum’s website.