Nick Turse
As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan
My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan

My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan
My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan

My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

A view of my idyllic workspace at George’s Bar at the Logali House in Juba where I wrote much of my latest article on the desperate situation at a UN camp for internally displaced persons in Malakal, South Sudan
Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year. Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared. “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me. 

A view of my idyllic workspace at George’s Bar at the Logali House in Juba where I wrote much of my latest article on the desperate situation at a UN camp for internally displaced persons in Malakal, South Sudan

Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year. Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared. “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me. 

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan
My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan

My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan
My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan

My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan
My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan

My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan
My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

As a Man-Made Famine Looms, Christmas Comes Early to South Sudan

My latest reporting from South Sudan takes you from a Christmas-in-July party at the U.S. Embassy in Juba to a dismal, muddy UN camp deep in the countryside outside Malakal. Already, 3.9 million South Sudanese are facing catastrophic food insecurity and 50,000 children may die of malnutrition by the end of the year.  Right now, experts in Juba are crunching numbers to decide if and when famine can be declared.  “Half the kids may already be dead by the time famine is actually declared,” one UNICEF official told me.

doctorswithoutborders:

South Sudan: “What We Are Facing Is An Extremely Serious Situation”
About 100,000 refugees fleeing the fighting in the Sudanese state of Blue Nile have taken refuge in Maban County in South Sudan. In the camp of Batil, home to 34,000 people, malnutrition is increasing. More than 1,000 children have been admitted to Doctors Without Borders’ nutritional programs, and the number continues to rise as the humanitarian response struggles to keep up with the needs.
Photo:A child is examined for symptoms of malnutrition at Jamam refugee camp in Upper Nile State. South Sudan 2012 © Robin Meldrum/MSF

doctorswithoutborders:

South Sudan: “What We Are Facing Is An Extremely Serious Situation”

About 100,000 refugees fleeing the fighting in the Sudanese state of Blue Nile have taken refuge in Maban County in South Sudan. In the camp of Batil, home to 34,000 people, malnutrition is increasing. More than 1,000 children have been admitted to Doctors Without Borders’ nutritional programs, and the number continues to rise as the humanitarian response struggles to keep up with the needs.

Photo:A child is examined for symptoms of malnutrition at Jamam refugee camp in Upper Nile State.
South Sudan 2012 © Robin Meldrum/MSF

Secret Wars, Secret Bases, and the Pentagon’s “New Spice Route” in Africa

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the Pentagon has set up bases all over Africa, in places like Nzara, South Sudan; Manda Bay, Kenya; and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.  In my latest article, I’ve tried to map out these American outposts and the shadow supply network, which the military privately calls “the New Spice Route,” that has been created to service them.  The Pentagon told me that its operations in Africa were small and limited in nature.  My research suggests otherwise.  Check out the full story here. 

Photos: U.S. aircraft, including fighter-bombers, at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.  Thanks Google!

Secret Wars, Secret Bases, and the Pentagon’s “New Spice Route” in Africa

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the Pentagon has set up bases all over Africa, in places like Nzara, South Sudan; Manda Bay, Kenya; and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.  In my latest article, I’ve tried to map out these American outposts and the shadow supply network, which the military privately calls “the New Spice Route,” that has been created to service them.  The Pentagon told me that its operations in Africa were small and limited in nature.  My research suggests otherwise.  Check out the full story here. 

Photos: U.S. aircraft, including fighter-bombers, at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.  Thanks Google!