Nick Turse

It was bound to happen one of these days.  I was taking one of my periodic strolls through The Strand’s outdoor bargain book carts and there it was — my first book, The Complex.  Oh, the ignominy!  Out on the street, asking price $2. 

Since I’ve long since overcome the shame of shameless promotion, I removed it from the shelf and gave it prominent placement (see second photo).  I wondered if it might be a little desperate but you cannot argue with success.  When I walked back 5 minutes later, there was no sign of the book anywhere.

nickturse:

For my second installment of finds from the 48-cent “bargain bin” of NYC’s Strand Book Store, I offer this fantastic Orwell volume. 
When he’s at his best, it’s damn hard to find a better writer than the word-artist formerly known as Eric Arthur Blair.  Clear, concise, powerful sentences elegantly woven together — that’s Orwell.  As a writer, it’s always humbling to read him.  But this collection also has unpublished material, like private letters to friends.  And guess what?  The prose is downright pedestrian.  It almost makes you feel better, until you realize that Orwell must have agonized over word choice, sentence construction and edited himself like mad.  So if your sentences are clunkier and are filled with extraneous words and over-worn phrases, it means you must just be lazier than ol’ George was.  Sigh.    
Published by Penguin in 1970, this volume was — due to copyright restrictions — not available for sale in the U.S.  (It retailed for $2.15 in Canada and $1.70 in New Zealand.)  While you may not be able to find this particular volume much anymore, you can find plenty of Orwell selections at The Strand and elsewhere.
If you find yourself in the mood, check out The Strand’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above.  For more on Orwell, check out this page from the BBC.

nickturse:

For my second installment of finds from the 48-cent “bargain bin” of NYC’s Strand Book Store, I offer this fantastic Orwell volume. 

When he’s at his best, it’s damn hard to find a better writer than the word-artist formerly known as Eric Arthur Blair.  Clear, concise, powerful sentences elegantly woven together — that’s Orwell.  As a writer, it’s always humbling to read him.  But this collection also has unpublished material, like private letters to friends.  And guess what?  The prose is downright pedestrian.  It almost makes you feel better, until you realize that Orwell must have agonized over word choice, sentence construction and edited himself like mad.  So if your sentences are clunkier and are filled with extraneous words and over-worn phrases, it means you must just be lazier than ol’ George was.  Sigh.    

Published by Penguin in 1970, this volume was — due to copyright restrictions — not available for sale in the U.S.  (It retailed for $2.15 in Canada and $1.70 in New Zealand.)  While you may not be able to find this particular volume much anymore, you can find plenty of Orwell selections at The Strand and elsewhere.

If you find yourself in the mood, check out The Strand’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above.  For more on Orwell, check out this page from the BBC.

For my second installment of finds from the 48-cent “bargain bin” of NYC’s Strand Book Store, I offer this fantastic Orwell volume.
When he’s at his best, it’s damn hard to find a better writer than the word-artist formerly known as Eric Arthur Blair.  Clear, concise, powerful sentences elegantly woven together — that’s Orwell.  As a writer, it’s always humbling to read him.  But this collection also has unpublished material, like private letters to friends.  And guess what?  The prose is downright pedestrian.  It almost makes you feel better, until you realize that Orwell must have agonized over word choice, sentence construction and edited himself like mad.  So if your sentences are clunkier and are filled with extraneous words and over-worn phrases, it means you must just be lazier than ol’ George was.  Sigh.    
Published by Penguin in 1970, this volume was — due to copyright restrictions — not available for sale in the U.S.  (It retailed for $2.15 in Canada and $1.70 in New Zealand.)  While you may not be able to find this particular edition much anymore, you can find plenty of Orwell selections at The Strand and elsewhere.
If you find yourself in the mood, check out The Strand’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above.  For more on Orwell, check out this page from the BBC.

For my second installment of finds from the 48-cent “bargain bin” of NYC’s Strand Book Store, I offer this fantastic Orwell volume.

When he’s at his best, it’s damn hard to find a better writer than the word-artist formerly known as Eric Arthur Blair.  Clear, concise, powerful sentences elegantly woven together — that’s Orwell.  As a writer, it’s always humbling to read him.  But this collection also has unpublished material, like private letters to friends.  And guess what?  The prose is downright pedestrian.  It almost makes you feel better, until you realize that Orwell must have agonized over word choice, sentence construction and edited himself like mad.  So if your sentences are clunkier and are filled with extraneous words and over-worn phrases, it means you must just be lazier than ol’ George was.  Sigh.    

Published by Penguin in 1970, this volume was — due to copyright restrictions — not available for sale in the U.S.  (It retailed for $2.15 in Canada and $1.70 in New Zealand.)  While you may not be able to find this particular edition much anymore, you can find plenty of Orwell selections at The Strand and elsewhere.

If you find yourself in the mood, check out The Strand’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above.  For more on Orwell, check out this page from the BBC.

For my second installment of finds from the 48-cent “bargain bin” of NYC’s Strand Book Store, I offer this fantastic Orwell volume. 
When he’s at his best, it’s damn hard to find a better writer than the word-artist formerly known as Eric Arthur Blair.  Clear, concise, powerful sentences elegantly woven together — that’s Orwell.  As a writer, it’s always humbling to read him.  But this collection also has unpublished material, like private letters to friends.  And guess what?  The prose is downright pedestrian.  It almost makes you feel better, until you realize that Orwell must have agonized over word choice, sentence construction and edited himself like mad.  So if your sentences are clunkier and are filled with extraneous words and over-worn phrases, it means you must just be lazier than ol’ George was.  Sigh.    
Published by Penguin in 1970, this volume was — due to copyright restrictions — not available for sale in the U.S.  (It retailed for $2.15 in Canada and $1.70 in New Zealand.)  While you may not be able to find this particular volume much anymore, you can find plenty of Orwell selections at The Strand and elsewhere.
If you find yourself in the mood, check out The Strand’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above.  For more on Orwell, check out this page from the BBC.

For my second installment of finds from the 48-cent “bargain bin” of NYC’s Strand Book Store, I offer this fantastic Orwell volume. 

When he’s at his best, it’s damn hard to find a better writer than the word-artist formerly known as Eric Arthur Blair.  Clear, concise, powerful sentences elegantly woven together — that’s Orwell.  As a writer, it’s always humbling to read him.  But this collection also has unpublished material, like private letters to friends.  And guess what?  The prose is downright pedestrian.  It almost makes you feel better, until you realize that Orwell must have agonized over word choice, sentence construction and edited himself like mad.  So if your sentences are clunkier and are filled with extraneous words and over-worn phrases, it means you must just be lazier than ol’ George was.  Sigh.    

Published by Penguin in 1970, this volume was — due to copyright restrictions — not available for sale in the U.S.  (It retailed for $2.15 in Canada and $1.70 in New Zealand.)  While you may not be able to find this particular volume much anymore, you can find plenty of Orwell selections at The Strand and elsewhere.

If you find yourself in the mood, check out The Strand’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above.  For more on Orwell, check out this page from the BBC.

Like millions of other people, the Strand is one of my favorite bookstores in the whole wide world.  The sole survivor of close to 50 book shops on what used to be known as Manhattan’s “Book Row,” it’s one of NYC’s true gems.  If you’re in town, you simply must go.
While the 18 miles of new, used and rare books within The Strand’s walls are endlessly fascinating, I’m an even bigger fan of the “bargain bin” books outside.  On any given day, you can find a plethora of worthy texts in need of rescue on the $1 and $2 carts that line the sidewalk on East 12th Street.  The pièce de résistance, however, is the collection of 48 cent paperbacks. This one little cart has it all: hideous old novellas by no-name authors, best-sellers from a decade ago, vintage mass market masterpieces — you name it.  There’s no telling what you’ll find and it’s always — ALWAYS — worth a peek.  I’ve decided to share my 48-cent-finds from time to time on Tumblr.  Here’s one that I nabbed a few weeks back, a 1969 edition of Tom Wolfe’s The Pump House Gang, a collection of his essays on 1960s subcultures.  Dig that cover.  For good or for ill, they don’t design them like that anymore.
It looks as though The Pump House Gang may be out of print, but you can always try to search out a copy at the Strand or your local used book store. 
If you find yourself in the mood, check out Strand Book Store’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above. 

Like millions of other people, the Strand is one of my favorite bookstores in the whole wide world.  The sole survivor of close to 50 book shops on what used to be known as Manhattan’s “Book Row,” it’s one of NYC’s true gems.  If you’re in town, you simply must go.

While the 18 miles of new, used and rare books within The Strand’s walls are endlessly fascinating, I’m an even bigger fan of the “bargain bin” books outside.  On any given day, you can find a plethora of worthy texts in need of rescue on the $1 and $2 carts that line the sidewalk on East 12th Street.  The pièce de résistance, however, is the collection of 48 cent paperbacks. This one little cart has it all: hideous old novellas by no-name authors, best-sellers from a decade ago, vintage mass market masterpieces — you name it.  There’s no telling what you’ll find and it’s always — ALWAYS — worth a peek.  I’ve decided to share my 48-cent-finds from time to time on Tumblr.  Here’s one that I nabbed a few weeks back, a 1969 edition of Tom Wolfe’s The Pump House Gang, a collection of his essays on 1960s subcultures.  Dig that cover.  For good or for ill, they don’t design them like that anymore.

It looks as though The Pump House Gang may be out of print, but you can always try to search out a copy at the Strand or your local used book store. 

If you find yourself in the mood, check out Strand Book Store’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above. 

Like millions of other people, the Strand is one of my favorite bookstores in the whole wide world.  The sole survivor of close to 50 book shops on what used to be known as Manhattan’s “Book Row,” it’s one of NYC’s true gems.  If you’re in town, you simply must go. 
While the 18 miles of new, used and rare books within The Strand’s walls are endlessly fascinating, I’m an even bigger fan of the “bargain bin” books outside.  On any given day, you can find a plethora of worthy texts in need of rescue on the $1 and $2 carts that line the sidewalk on East 12th Street.  The pièce de résistance, however, is the collection of 48 cent paperbacks. This one little cart has it all: hideous old novellas by no-name authors, best-sellers from a decade ago, vintage mass market masterpieces — you name it.  There’s no telling what you’ll find and it’s always — ALWAYS — worth a peek.  I’ve decided to share my 48-cent-finds from time to time on Tumblr.  Here’s one that I nabbed a few weeks back, a 1969 edition of Tom Wolfe’s The Pump House Gang, a collection of his essays on 1960s subcultures.  Dig that cover.  For good or for ill, they don’t design them like that anymore.
It looks as though The Pump House Gang may be out of print, but you can always try to search out a copy at The Strand or your local used book store. 
If you find yourself in the mood, check out Strand Book Store’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above. 

Like millions of other people, the Strand is one of my favorite bookstores in the whole wide world.  The sole survivor of close to 50 book shops on what used to be known as Manhattan’s “Book Row,” it’s one of NYC’s true gems.  If you’re in town, you simply must go. 

While the 18 miles of new, used and rare books within The Strand’s walls are endlessly fascinating, I’m an even bigger fan of the “bargain bin” books outside.  On any given day, you can find a plethora of worthy texts in need of rescue on the $1 and $2 carts that line the sidewalk on East 12th Street.  The pièce de résistance, however, is the collection of 48 cent paperbacks. This one little cart has it all: hideous old novellas by no-name authors, best-sellers from a decade ago, vintage mass market masterpieces — you name it.  There’s no telling what you’ll find and it’s always — ALWAYS — worth a peek.  I’ve decided to share my 48-cent-finds from time to time on Tumblr.  Here’s one that I nabbed a few weeks back, a 1969 edition of Tom Wolfe’s The Pump House Gang, a collection of his essays on 1960s subcultures.  Dig that cover.  For good or for ill, they don’t design them like that anymore.

It looks as though The Pump House Gang may be out of print, but you can always try to search out a copy at The Strand or your local used book store. 

If you find yourself in the mood, check out Strand Book Store’s Tumblr here or just click the pic above. 

bookmania:

Strand Books, New York. In 1927, Ben Bass opened Strand Book Store on Fourth Avenue, home of New York’s legendary Book Row. Named after the famous publishing street in London, the Strand was one of 48 bookstores on Book Row, which started in the 1890’s and ran from Union Square to Astor Place.

The best.  Nuff said.

bookmania:

Strand Books, New York. In 1927, Ben Bass opened Strand Book Store on Fourth Avenue, home of New York’s legendary Book Row. Named after the famous publishing street in London, the Strand was one of 48 bookstores on Book Row, which started in the 1890’s and ran from Union Square to Astor Place.

The best.  Nuff said.