Nick Turse

nickturse:

Blurbs are coming in for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam and I can’t help but share this one from Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried, Going After Cacciato, and If I Die in a Combat Zone, among others.  I’m left speechless. 

“This book is an overdue and powerfully detailed account of widespread war crimes — homicide and torture and mutilation and rape — committed by American soldiers over the course of our military engagement in Vietnam. Nick Turse’s research and reportage is based in part on the U.S. military’s own records, reports, and transcripts, many of them long hidden from public scrutiny. Kill Anything That Moves is not only a compendium of pervasive and illegal and sickening savagery toward Vietnamese civilians, but it is also a record of repetitive deceit and cover-ups on the part of high ranking officers and officials. In the end, I hope, Turse’s book will become a hard-to-avoid, hard-to-dismiss corrective to the very common belief that war crimes and tolerance for war crimes were mere anomalies during our country’s military involvement in Vietnam.” —Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried

Blurbs are coming in for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam and I can’t help but share this one from Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried, Going After Cacciato, and If I Die in a Combat Zone, among others.  I’m left speechless. 

"This book is an overdue and powerfully detailed account of widespread war crimes — homicide and torture and mutilation and rape — committed by American soldiers over the course of our military engagement in Vietnam. Nick Turse’s research and reportage is based in part on the U.S. military’s own records, reports, and transcripts, many of them long hidden from public scrutiny. Kill Anything That Moves is not only a compendium of pervasive and illegal and sickening savagery toward Vietnamese civilians, but it is also a record of repetitive deceit and cover-ups on the part of high ranking officers and officials. In the end, I hope, Turse’s book will become a hard-to-avoid, hard-to-dismiss corrective to the very common belief that war crimes and tolerance for war crimes were mere anomalies during our country’s military involvement in Vietnam.” —Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried