Nick Turse
It’s the way some men say, ‘I’m not the problem’ or that they shifted the conversation from actual corpses and victims as well as perpetrators to protecting the comfort level of bystander males. An exasperated woman remarked to me, ‘What do they want — a cookie for not hitting, raping, or threatening women?’ Women are afraid of being raped and murdered all the time and sometimes that’s more important to talk about than protecting male comfort levels. Or as someone named Jenny Chiu tweeted, ‘Sure #NotAllMen are misogynists and rapists. That’s not the point. The point is that #YesAllWomen live in fear of the ones that are.’
Rebecca Solnit’s Men Explain Things To Me is out today! Get the new feminist instant classic that the Boston Globe says “hums with power and wit" and that Entertainment Weekly calls “brilliant” for 25% off with code SOLNIT25 http://bit.ly/LVh4np

Rebecca Solnit’s Men Explain Things To Me is out today! Get the new feminist instant classic that the Boston Globe says “hums with power and wit" and that Entertainment Weekly calls “brilliant” for 25% off with code SOLNIT25 http://bit.ly/LVh4np

What is Operation New Normal and why won’t the U.S. military talk about it?
In my latest investigation of shadowy U.S. military missions in Africa, I try to figure out just that. The article begins:
“What is Operation New Normal? It’s a question without an answer, a riddle the U.S. military refuses to solve. It’s a secret operation in Africa that no one knows anything about. Except that someone does. His name is Lieutenant Colonel Robert E. Lee Magee. He lives and breathes Operation New Normal. But he doesn’t want to breath paint fumes or talk to me, so you can’t know anything about it.
Confused? Stay with me.
“Whatever Operation New Normal may be pales in comparison to the real “new normal” for U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM). The lower-cased variant is bold and muscular. It’s an expeditionary force on a war footing. To the men involved, it’s a story of growth and expansion, new battlefields, ‘combat,’ and ‘war.’ It’s the culmination of years of construction, ingratiation, and interventions, the fruits of wide-eyed expansion and dismal policy failures, the backing of proxies to fight America’s battles, while increasing U.S. personnel and firepower in and around the continent. It is, to quote an officer with AFRICOM, the blossoming of a ‘war-fighting combatant command.’ And unlike Operation New Normal, it’s finally heading for a media outlet near you.”
Read the entire article here: Nick Turse, How “Benghazi” Birthed the New Normal in Africa | TomDispatch

What is Operation New Normal and why won’t the U.S. military talk about it?

In my latest investigation of shadowy U.S. military missions in Africa, I try to figure out just that. The article begins:

“What is Operation New Normal? It’s a question without an answer, a riddle the U.S. military refuses to solve. It’s a secret operation in Africa that no one knows anything about. Except that someone does. His name is Lieutenant Colonel Robert E. Lee Magee. He lives and breathes Operation New Normal. But he doesn’t want to breath paint fumes or talk to me, so you can’t know anything about it.

Confused? Stay with me.

“Whatever Operation New Normal may be pales in comparison to the real “new normal” for U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM). The lower-cased variant is bold and muscular. It’s an expeditionary force on a war footing. To the men involved, it’s a story of growth and expansion, new battlefields, ‘combat,’ and ‘war.’ It’s the culmination of years of construction, ingratiation, and interventions, the fruits of wide-eyed expansion and dismal policy failures, the backing of proxies to fight America’s battles, while increasing U.S. personnel and firepower in and around the continent. It is, to quote an officer with AFRICOM, the blossoming of a ‘war-fighting combatant command.’ And unlike Operation New Normal, it’s finally heading for a media outlet near you.”

Read the entire article here: Nick Turse, How “Benghazi” Birthed the New Normal in Africa | TomDispatch

America’s Non-Stop Military Ops in Africa
The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.
Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”? (via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

America’s Non-Stop Military Ops in Africa

The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.

Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”?

(via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

Lion Forward Teams? Echo Casemate? Juniper Micron? In my latest piece for TomDispatch, I decode the the U.S. proxy wars in Africa, explore the “French Connection,” and offer a peek at some previously unreleased U.S. military documents that I obtained in reporting this story.
(via Tomgram: Nick Turse, American Proxy Wars in Africa | TomDispatch)

Lion Forward Teams? Echo Casemate? Juniper Micron? In my latest piece for TomDispatch, I decode the the U.S. proxy wars in Africa, explore the “French Connection,” and offer a peek at some previously unreleased U.S. military documents that I obtained in reporting this story.

(via Tomgram: Nick Turse, American Proxy Wars in Africa | TomDispatch)

Where are U.S. Special Operations forces and what are they doing?
In my latest article, I reveal — for the first time anywhere — the full extent of black ops deployments during 2013 and analyze the potential pitfalls of conducting a globalized secret war.  Without a clear picture of where the U.S. military’s covert forces are operating and what they are doing, Americans may not even recognize the consequences of and blowback from our expanding secret wars as they wash over the world.  But if history is any guide, they will be felt — from Southwest Asia to the Mahgreb, the Middle East to Central Africa, and, perhaps eventually, in the United States as well.
For the full story, see “The Special Ops Surge: America’s Secret War in 134 Countries” 

Where are U.S. Special Operations forces and what are they doing?

In my latest article, I reveal — for the first time anywhere — the full extent of black ops deployments during 2013 and analyze the potential pitfalls of conducting a globalized secret war.  Without a clear picture of where the U.S. military’s covert forces are operating and what they are doing, Americans may not even recognize the consequences of and blowback from our expanding secret wars as they wash over the world.  But if history is any guide, they will be felt — from Southwest Asia to the Mahgreb, the Middle East to Central Africa, and, perhaps eventually, in the United States as well.

For the full story, see “The Special Ops Surge: America’s Secret War in 134 Countries” 

The past guides us; the future needs us.
Martin Luther King studied Thoreau and Gandhi and put their ideas to work in the United States, while in 1952 the African National Congress and the young Nelson Mandela were collaborating with the South African Indian Congress on civil disobedience campaigns. You wish you could write Thoreau a letter about all this. He had no way of knowing that what he planted would still be bearing fruit 151 years after his death. But the past doesn’t need us. The past guides us; the future needs us.
The future for whistleblowers is grim. At a time not so far distant, when just about everything is digital, when much of the world’s Internet traffic flows directly through the United States or allied countries, or through the infrastructure of American companies abroad, when search engines can find just about anything online in fractions of a second, when the Patriot Act and secret rulings by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court make Google and similar tech giants tools of the national security state (assuming organizations like the NSA don’t simply take over the search business directly), and when the sophisticated technology can either block, alter, or delete digital material at the push of a button, the memory hole is no longer fiction.
Over the last year and a half, Wall Street hedge funds and private equity firms have quietly amassed an unprecedented rental empire, snapping up Queen Anne Victorians in Atlanta, brick-faced bungalows in Chicago, Spanish revivals in Phoenix. In total, these deep-pocketed investors have bought more than 200,000 cheap, mostly foreclosed houses in cities hardest hit by the economic meltdown. Wall Street’s foreclosure crisis, which began in late 2007 and forced more than 10 million people from their homes, has created a paradoxical problem. Millions of evicted Americans need a safe place to live, even as millions of vacant, bank-owned houses are blighting neighborhoods and spurring a rise in crime. Lucky for us, Wall Street has devised a solution: It’s going to rent these foreclosed houses back to us. In the process, it’s devised a new form of securitization that could cause this whole plan to blow up — again.
Laura Gottesdiener from her alarming new article, “The Empire Strikes Back: How Wall Street Has Turned Housing Into a Dangerous Get-Rich- Quick Scheme — Again” at TomDispatch