Nick Turse
Angry Over U.S. Surveillance, Tech Giants Bolster Defenses
The New York Times reports that reports that the tech giants are taking a series of anti-NSA counter-measures.  Specifically:
“Google has spent months and millions of dollars encrypting email, search queries and other information flowing among its data centers worldwide. Facebook’s chief executive said at a conference this fall that the government ‘blew it.’ And though it has not been announced publicly, Twitter plans to set up new types of encryption to protect messages from snoops.”

Angry Over U.S. Surveillance, Tech Giants Bolster Defenses

The New York Times reports that reports that the tech giants are taking a series of anti-NSA counter-measures.  Specifically:

Google has spent months and millions of dollars encrypting email, search queries and other information flowing among its data centers worldwide. Facebook’s chief executive said at a conference this fall that the government ‘blew it.’ And though it has not been announced publicly, Twitter plans to set up new types of encryption to protect messages from snoops.”

wnyc:

(via Map: How New York Tweeted During Hurricane Sandy | Co.Design: business innovation design)
chicagopubliclibrary:

America’s Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong
Taken from NPR:

In what may come as a pleasant surprise to people who fear the Facebook generation has given up on reading — or, at least, reading anything longer than 140 characters — a new report from the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project reveals the prominent role of books, libraries and technology in the lives of young readers, ages 16 to 29.
Kathryn Zickuhr, the study’s main author, joins NPR’s David Greene to discuss the results.

Click here to read the full article.

chicagopubliclibrary:

America’s Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong

Taken from NPR:

In what may come as a pleasant surprise to people who fear the Facebook generation has given up on reading — or, at least, reading anything longer than 140 characters — a new report from the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project reveals the prominent role of books, libraries and technology in the lives of young readers, ages 16 to 29.

Kathryn Zickuhr, the study’s main author, joins NPR’s David Greene to discuss the results.

Click here to read the full article.

bonedust:

dammit

bonedust:

dammit

newsweek:

Lots of hubbub was made these past few weeks over Mitt Romney’s mysterious spike in Twitter followers. Did he buy fakes? Was he cheating? Are his follower numbers misleading? If new site StatusPeople—which looks at an account’s followers to see which are fake, which are inactive, and which are active—is to believed, Barack Obama’s the real offender. 41% of the President’s Twitter followers are fake accounts.

Most interestingly, during our investigation, Republican nominee for US President Mitt Romney has been scrutinized recently for his abnormal increase in new followers (@mittromney), indicating that these followers had been purchased in the same way as the Dealers/Abuser scenario from our study. We do note that these followers could have been purchased by either himself, his associates or by his opponents. Particularly, on July 21st, 2012, his follower number went from 673,002 to 789,924, representing a gain of 116,922 or 17%. As this story picked up momentum, we quickly pulled his newest followers since the big breakout, (resulting in 152,966 new Twitter accounts), and can disclose several interesting statistics of these followers.

Statistics of Romney’s newest 152,966 Twitter followers(between Jul 21st and Jul 26th 2012):

- The number of Romney’s followers increased 17% (or 116,922) on a single day Jul 21, 2012, going from 673,002 to 789,924.

- 25% of these followers are less than 3 weeks old (created after July 17th 2012), 80% of them are less than 3 months old

- 23% or about 1/4 of these followers have no tweet

- 10% of these account has already been suspended by Twitter

An analysis of Twitter’s black market economy, including @mittromney’s new legion of fake followers. (via ensignau)
theatlantic:

The 17th-Century Paper Social Network 

Is this a 17th-century Twitter? Maybe. (Even before this scrap came to light, the promotional material for the play Brief Lives called Aubrey “the world’s oldest blogger.”) The scrap both does and doesn’t mirror a tweet — or a status update, or a Tumblr post, or anything on any social network. It has structural limits. It’s odd, jotted, and hasty. It brimming with scribbled social information, meaningful only to those steeped in its world.

Read more. [Image: Bodleian Library]

theatlantic:

The 17th-Century Paper Social Network 

Is this a 17th-century Twitter? Maybe. (Even before this scrap came to light, the promotional material for the play Brief Lives called Aubrey “the world’s oldest blogger.”) The scrap both does and doesn’t mirror a tweet — or a status update, or a Tumblr post, or anything on any social network. It has structural limits. It’s odd, jotted, and hasty. It brimming with scribbled social information, meaningful only to those steeped in its world.

Read more. [Image: Bodleian Library]

motherjones:

Where did all these fake followers of Mitt Romney’s Twitter account come from?
US News isn’t totally sure, but they found the guy whose picture got boosted for ‘em.

motherjones:

Where did all these fake followers of Mitt Romney’s Twitter account come from?

US News isn’t totally sure, but they found the guy whose picture got boosted for ‘em.

That plan to archive every tweet in the Library of Congress? Definitely still happening » Nieman Journalism Lab
Library spokeswoman Jennifer Gavin told Nieman Journalism Lab that the archive will eventually be available to anyone with a library card, but only at the library in Washington. “My understanding is that at this time we do not intend to make it available by web,” she said. Twitter said the tweets could be used only “for internal library use, for non-commercial research, public display by the library itself, and preservation.”

That plan to archive every tweet in the Library of Congress? Definitely still happening » Nieman Journalism Lab

Library spokeswoman Jennifer Gavin told Nieman Journalism Lab that the archive will eventually be available to anyone with a library card, but only at the library in Washington. “My understanding is that at this time we do not intend to make it available by web,” she said. Twitter said the tweets could be used only “for internal library use, for non-commercial research, public display by the library itself, and preservation.”

That plan to archive every tweet in the Library of Congress? Definitely still happening » Nieman Journalism Lab
Library spokeswoman Jennifer Gavin told Nieman Journalism Lab that the archive will eventually be available to anyone with a library card, but only at the library in Washington. “My understanding is that at this time we do not intend to make it available by web,” she said. Twitter said the tweets could be used only “for internal library use, for non-commercial research, public display by the library itself, and preservation.”

That plan to archive every tweet in the Library of Congress? Definitely still happening » Nieman Journalism Lab

Library spokeswoman Jennifer Gavin told Nieman Journalism Lab that the archive will eventually be available to anyone with a library card, but only at the library in Washington. “My understanding is that at this time we do not intend to make it available by web,” she said. Twitter said the tweets could be used only “for internal library use, for non-commercial research, public display by the library itself, and preservation.”