Nick Turse
tamturse:

Fiery Sunrise 1 on Flickr.
A beautiful sunrise over Manhattan

tamturse:

Fiery Sunrise 1 on Flickr.

A beautiful sunrise over Manhattan

tamturse:

Fiery Sunrise 1 on Flickr.
A beautiful sunrise over Manhattan

tamturse:

Fiery Sunrise 1 on Flickr.

A beautiful sunrise over Manhattan

Kowloon, You Ma Tei, Temple Street Night Market, Hong Kong, China
© Atlantide Phototravel/Corbis


(NT — One of my favorite cities and one of the most beautiful at night!)

Kowloon, You Ma Tei, Temple Street Night Market, Hong Kong, China

© Atlantide Phototravel/Corbis
(NT — One of my favorite cities and one of the most beautiful at night!)
In East Asia alone - in one of the most disaster-stricken areas worldwide - the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) estimates the number of people living in urban flood plains may reach 67 million by 2060.
Some 3.3 billion people (more than half of the world’s population) live in urban areas, a figure which is expected to rise to five billion by 2030. Ninety-five percent of this growth is taking place in countries least able to afford the cost of expansion.
Somebody living in a slum and very poor like I am must make a choice. I can’t use 10 Kenya shillings (US$0.12) to pay for a toilet every day when that can buy me a jerrycan of water for bathing and washing my clothes

Walter Opicha, a resident of Manyatta, a sprawling slum in the western Kenya city of Kisumu, tells the United Nations’ news agency IRIN about the hard choices slum dwellers make everyday. 

Read more at: IRIN Africa | KENYA: Human waste woes in slums

nickturse:


On Friday, December 21, 2012, R trains resumed service through the Montague Tube, which connects Brooklyn Heights with Lower Manhattan after more than a month of around-the-clock work in one of the most storm-ravaged sections of the MTA transit system.
In this photo, an R train waits to depart Whitehall St. Station.
Click here for more information.
Photo: MTA New York City Transit / Marc Hermann.

nickturse:

On Friday, December 21, 2012, R trains resumed service through the Montague Tube, which connects Brooklyn Heights with Lower Manhattan after more than a month of around-the-clock work in one of the most storm-ravaged sections of the MTA transit system.

In this photo, an R train waits to depart Whitehall St. Station.

Click here for more information.

Photo: MTA New York City Transit / Marc Hermann.


On Friday, December 21, 2012, R trains resumed service through the Montague Tube, which connects Brooklyn Heights with Lower Manhattan after more than a month of around-the-clock work in one of the most storm-ravaged sections of the MTA transit system.
In this photo, an R train waits to depart Whitehall St. Station.
Click here for more information.
Photo: MTA New York City Transit / Marc Hermann.

On Friday, December 21, 2012, R trains resumed service through the Montague Tube, which connects Brooklyn Heights with Lower Manhattan after more than a month of around-the-clock work in one of the most storm-ravaged sections of the MTA transit system.

In this photo, an R train waits to depart Whitehall St. Station.

Click here for more information.

Photo: MTA New York City Transit / Marc Hermann.

Cities with more than 500,000 inhabitants account for over 70% of homicides in Costa Rica, 68% in Guatemala, and 63% in El Salvador.

Crimes may be more likely to be reported in urban areas, skewing the statistics. In a study in Kenya, for example, urban inhabitants were more likely to report crimes than their rural counterparts.

In many countries, urban areas have a higher rate of violence using firearms. Fifty metropolitan areas surveyed in a recent U.S. study, representing 54% of the national population, accounted for 67% of firearms homicides.

While the size of cities does not appear to have a direct correlation with violent crime rates, a high rate of urbanization often correlates with greater violence.

Other factors that can exacerbate urban armed violence include: rates of unemployment; high proportions of youth; low levels of education; poor urban design; proliferation of firearms; and high density of informal settlements.

Key findings from Urban Armed Violence, a new report by the Small Arms Survey and the Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence and Development.
lbjlibrary:

December 14, 1965. The Outside Task Force on Urban Affairs and Housing, tasked by LBJ to investigate the causes of the riots in Watts, submits its report to the President. Their statement of “the urban problem”: 

“-the great dimensions of unmet housing needs: some 7 million urban families live in homes of such disrepair as to violate housing code standards of major cities.
-the growth of population: 2 million new units of housing are needed each year for the foreseeable future—an increase in the volume of production 25% greater than has ever been achieved before.
-the chronic inability of the country to provide low income housing of adequate quality at a reasonable price…
-the special problem of the poor and the Negro unable to move freely from racial ghettos and subject to heavy exploitation in the costs they pay for the  necessities of life: 3 our of 10 slum houses are now occupied by Negroes, and at high rent levels the proportion of Negro families living in substandard housing is six times greater than that of white families. 
-the inability of metropolitan areas to deal with the movement of people and goods, in particular the failure to provide adequate mass transportation for families who do not own an automobile or where use of private vehicles is unnecessary  uneconomical, or socially undesirable. 
-increasing pressures on municiple costs…
-unnecessary and unwarranted restrictions for the suburban American as well—expressed in uniformity in housing choices, excessive costs of community facilities and services, gross deficiencies in recreation and leisure time opportunities. 
—for all metropolitan residents, urban and suburban alike, unnecessary costs imposed by lengthy journeys to work, growing dangers from water and air pollution.”

Report, “Outside 1965 Task Force on Urban Affairs and Housing”, 12/14/1965, Task Force Reports, Box 3. LBJ Library. Map: Los Angeles Metro, today. 

lbjlibrary:

December 14, 1965. The Outside Task Force on Urban Affairs and Housing, tasked by LBJ to investigate the causes of the riots in Watts, submits its report to the President. Their statement of “the urban problem”: 

-the great dimensions of unmet housing needs: some 7 million urban families live in homes of such disrepair as to violate housing code standards of major cities.

-the growth of population: 2 million new units of housing are needed each year for the foreseeable future—an increase in the volume of production 25% greater than has ever been achieved before.

-the chronic inability of the country to provide low income housing of adequate quality at a reasonable price

-the special problem of the poor and the Negro unable to move freely from racial ghettos and subject to heavy exploitation in the costs they pay for the  necessities of life: 3 our of 10 slum houses are now occupied by Negroes, and at high rent levels the proportion of Negro families living in substandard housing is six times greater than that of white families. 

-the inability of metropolitan areas to deal with the movement of people and goods, in particular the failure to provide adequate mass transportation for families who do not own an automobile or where use of private vehicles is unnecessary  uneconomical, or socially undesirable. 

-increasing pressures on municiple costs

-unnecessary and unwarranted restrictions for the suburban American as well—expressed in uniformity in housing choices, excessive costs of community facilities and services, gross deficiencies in recreation and leisure time opportunities. 

for all metropolitan residents, urban and suburban alike, unnecessary costs imposed by lengthy journeys to work, growing dangers from water and air pollution.”

Report, “Outside 1965 Task Force on Urban Affairs and Housing”, 12/14/1965, Task Force Reports, Box 3. LBJ Library. Map: Los Angeles Metro, today.