Nick Turse
U.S. Special Operations Forces are training hundreds of African commandos for elite counterterror units in Libya, Niger, Mauritania, and Mali (via U.S. Trains African Commandos to Fight Terrorism - NYTimes.com)
Photo: A United States Army Special Forces captain with leaders in Amaloul, Niger, one of the nations in an antiterrorism program.  Credit Peter Tinti

U.S. Special Operations Forces are training hundreds of African commandos for elite counterterror units in Libya, Niger, Mauritania, and Mali (via U.S. Trains African Commandos to Fight Terrorism - NYTimes.com)

Photo: A United States Army Special Forces captain with leaders in Amaloul, Niger, one of the nations in an antiterrorism program. Credit Peter Tinti

What is Operation New Normal and why won’t the U.S. military talk about it?
In my latest investigation of shadowy U.S. military missions in Africa, I try to figure out just that. The article begins:
“What is Operation New Normal? It’s a question without an answer, a riddle the U.S. military refuses to solve. It’s a secret operation in Africa that no one knows anything about. Except that someone does. His name is Lieutenant Colonel Robert E. Lee Magee. He lives and breathes Operation New Normal. But he doesn’t want to breath paint fumes or talk to me, so you can’t know anything about it.
Confused? Stay with me.
“Whatever Operation New Normal may be pales in comparison to the real “new normal” for U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM). The lower-cased variant is bold and muscular. It’s an expeditionary force on a war footing. To the men involved, it’s a story of growth and expansion, new battlefields, ‘combat,’ and ‘war.’ It’s the culmination of years of construction, ingratiation, and interventions, the fruits of wide-eyed expansion and dismal policy failures, the backing of proxies to fight America’s battles, while increasing U.S. personnel and firepower in and around the continent. It is, to quote an officer with AFRICOM, the blossoming of a ‘war-fighting combatant command.’ And unlike Operation New Normal, it’s finally heading for a media outlet near you.”
Read the entire article here: Nick Turse, How “Benghazi” Birthed the New Normal in Africa | TomDispatch

What is Operation New Normal and why won’t the U.S. military talk about it?

In my latest investigation of shadowy U.S. military missions in Africa, I try to figure out just that. The article begins:

“What is Operation New Normal? It’s a question without an answer, a riddle the U.S. military refuses to solve. It’s a secret operation in Africa that no one knows anything about. Except that someone does. His name is Lieutenant Colonel Robert E. Lee Magee. He lives and breathes Operation New Normal. But he doesn’t want to breath paint fumes or talk to me, so you can’t know anything about it.

Confused? Stay with me.

“Whatever Operation New Normal may be pales in comparison to the real “new normal” for U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM). The lower-cased variant is bold and muscular. It’s an expeditionary force on a war footing. To the men involved, it’s a story of growth and expansion, new battlefields, ‘combat,’ and ‘war.’ It’s the culmination of years of construction, ingratiation, and interventions, the fruits of wide-eyed expansion and dismal policy failures, the backing of proxies to fight America’s battles, while increasing U.S. personnel and firepower in and around the continent. It is, to quote an officer with AFRICOM, the blossoming of a ‘war-fighting combatant command.’ And unlike Operation New Normal, it’s finally heading for a media outlet near you.”

Read the entire article here: Nick Turse, How “Benghazi” Birthed the New Normal in Africa | TomDispatch

That is an agreement the United States ‘has with no country.’
An unnamed U.S. government official speaking to the New York Times, about Germany’s demand that the U.S. respect their laws on their territory.  U.S. and Germany Fail to Reach a Deal on Spying - NYTimes.com
A compound in Mali, an airfield in Niger, a string of air bases across the north of the continent and more than two years of “war” in Africa. Read my latest article to know what U.S. officials say behind closed doors about the future of U.S. ops in Africa.

A compound in Mali, an airfield in Niger, a string of air bases across the north of the continent and more than two years of “war” in Africa. Read my latest article to know what U.S. officials say behind closed doors about the future of U.S. ops in Africa.

Infographic of CIA Torture Techniques 

(via CIA ‘misled public about interrogation techniques’ - Yahoo News)
The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.
Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”? (via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)

The U.S. military averaged more than a mission a day in Africa in 2013 and previously unrevealed documents indicate more of the same for 2014.

Is it any wonder that the men running America’s secret ops in Africa call it “the battlefield of tomorrow, today”?

(via Nick Turse, America’s Non-Stop Ops in Africa | TomDispatch)


Watch the US Drop 2.5 Million Tons of Bombs on Laos

Picturing the deadly legacy of America’s secret war in the world’s most bombed-out country, courtesy of Mother Jones.

No further comment necessary…

The East German secret police, known as the Stasi, were an infamously intrusive secret police force. They amassed dossiers on about one quarter of the population of the country during the Communist regime. For the full story, see: You Know Who Else Collected Metadata? The Stasi - ProPublica

The East German secret police, known as the Stasi, were an infamously intrusive secret police force. They amassed dossiers on about one quarter of the population of the country during the Communist regime. For the full story, see: You Know Who Else Collected Metadata? The Stasi - ProPublica

NSA collects millions of text messages daily in ‘untargeted’ global sweep | The Guardian
The National Security Agency has collected almost 200 million text messages a day from across the globe, using them to extract data including location, contact networks and credit card details, according to top-secret documents provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and a joint investigation between the Guardian and the UK’s Channel 4 News.

NSA collects millions of text messages daily in ‘untargeted’ global sweep | The Guardian

The National Security Agency has collected almost 200 million text messages a day from across the globe, using them to extract data including location, contact networks and credit card details, according to top-secret documents provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and a joint investigation between the Guardian and the UK’s Channel 4 News.