Nick Turse

Watch the US Drop 2.5 Million Tons of Bombs on Laos

Picturing the deadly legacy of America’s secret war in the world’s most bombed-out country, courtesy of Mother Jones.


Watch the US Drop 2.5 Million Tons of Bombs on Laos

Picturing the deadly legacy of America’s secret war in the world’s most bombed-out country, courtesy of Mother Jones.

I’m deeply saddened by the passing of Jonathan Schell – a thinker, writer, and truth-teller of the highest order whose extraordinary reporting from Vietnam gave us some of the most indelible works on the war.  Not one to rest on his laurels, Schell went on to write incisively on the Nixon years before producing prescient books on the risks of nuclear war and the rise of people power. 

It was one of the great honors of my life to have Jonathan Schell endorse my own book on the Vietnam War and speaking with him about that conflict is indelibly seared into mind.  His work will endure for its truth and its humanity.  My late friend Gloria Emerson, another great chronicler of the Vietnam War said it best:  “If, years from now, Americans are willing to read any books about the war, let them be The Village of Ben Suc and The Military Half by Jonathan Schell. They tell everything.”

(via IRIN Asia | Little help for UXO victims in Laos | Laos | Conflict | Security)

Around 25 percent of villages in Laos are contaminated by unexploded ordnance (UXOs), mainly from US bombing missions between 1964 and 1973, according to the Lao National Unexploded Ordnance Programme, and while UXO casualties have fallen sharply in recent years there is little support for UXO victims.

(via IRIN Asia | Little help for UXO victims in Laos | Laos | Conflict | Security)

Around 25 percent of villages in Laos are contaminated by unexploded ordnance (UXOs), mainly from US bombing missions between 1964 and 1973, according to the Lao National Unexploded Ordnance Programme, and while UXO casualties have fallen sharply in recent years there is little support for UXO victims.

New York Public Radio - REWRITING HISTORY
169 plays

For your listening pleasure: I talk to Bob Garfield from WYNC’s On The Media about the Pentagon’s attempt to peddle a counterfeit history of the Vietnam War.

For more, read my latest article: “Misremembering America’s Wars, 2003-2053.”

New York Public Radio - REWRITING HISTORY
169 plays

For your listening pleasure: I talk to Bob Garfield from WYNC’s On The Media about the Pentagon’s attempt to peddle a counterfeit history of the Vietnam War.

For more, read my latest article: “Misremembering America’s Wars, 2003-2053.”

New York Public Radio - REWRITING HISTORY
169 plays

For your listening pleasure: I talk to Bob Garfield from WYNC’s On The Media about the Pentagon’s attempt to peddle a counterfeit history of the Vietnam War

For more, read my latest article: “Misremembering America’s Wars, 2003-2053.”

 “The Oriental doesn’t put the same high price on life as does the Westerner,” [U.S. commander, General William] Westmoreland famously said. “Life is plentiful, life is cheap in the Orient.”Having spoken to survivors of massacres by United States forces at Phi Phu, Trieu Ai, My Luoc and so many other hamlets, I can say with certainty that Westmoreland’s assessment was false.Decades after the conflict ended, villagers still mourn loved ones — spouses, parents, children — slain in horrific spasms of violence. They told me, too, about what it was like to live for years under American bombs, artillery shells and helicopter gunships; about what it was like to negotiate every aspect of their lives around the “American war,” as they call it; how the war transformed the most mundane tasks — getting water from a well or relieving oneself or working in the fields or gathering vegetables for a hungry family — into life-or-death decisions; about what it was like to live under United States policies that couldn’t have been more callous or contemptuous toward human life. 
Nick Turse, “For America, Life Was Cheap in Vietnam” - NYTimes.com

 “The Oriental doesn’t put the same high price on life as does the Westerner,” [U.S. commander, General William] Westmoreland famously said. “Life is plentiful, life is cheap in the Orient.”

Having spoken to survivors of massacres by United States forces at Phi Phu, Trieu Ai, My Luoc and so many other hamlets, I can say with certainty that Westmoreland’s assessment was false.

Decades after the conflict ended, villagers still mourn loved ones — spouses, parents, children — slain in horrific spasms of violence. They told me, too, about what it was like to live for years under American bombs, artillery shells and helicopter gunships; about what it was like to negotiate every aspect of their lives around the “American war,” as they call it; how the war transformed the most mundane tasks — getting water from a well or relieving oneself or working in the fields or gathering vegetables for a hungry family — into life-or-death decisions; about what it was like to live under United States policies that couldn’t have been more callous or contemptuous toward human life.

Nick Turse, “For America, Life Was Cheap in Vietnam” - NYTimes.com

For those in the Bay Area, I’ve got two appearances coming up.

On Monday, January 27 at 7:00 pm, I’ll be speaking about Kill Anything That Moves with Oscar Villalon, editor of ZZYZVA at the iconic City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco.

The next night, January 28 at 7:30 pm, I’ll be having a conversation with Vietnam veteran and former POW Phillip Butler at the First Congregational Church in Berkeley.

Hope to see you at either or both. For more details:

http://www.citylights.com/info/?fa=event&event_id=1985

and

http://www.kpfa.org/upcoming-kpfa-sponsored-events

The book tour rolls on.  This Friday, come on out to Brooklyn’s legendary Book Court to see me discuss Kill Anything That Moves (just out in paperback with a new afterword) with the whip-smart and always provocative Chase Madar (who reviewed the book for The American Conservative).

When: Friday, January 17th at 7:00PM

Where:  163 Court Street (between Pacific & Dean streets)
Brooklyn, USA

Details: http://bookcourt.com/events/nick-turse