Nick Turse
New York Public Radio - REWRITING HISTORY
243 plays

For your listening pleasure: I talk to Bob Garfield from WYNC’s On The Media about the Pentagon’s attempt to peddle a counterfeit history of the Vietnam War.

For more, read my latest article: “Misremembering America’s Wars, 2003-2053.”

New York Public Radio - REWRITING HISTORY
243 plays

For your listening pleasure: I talk to Bob Garfield from WYNC’s On The Media about the Pentagon’s attempt to peddle a counterfeit history of the Vietnam War

For more, read my latest article: “Misremembering America’s Wars, 2003-2053.”

Embedding with the American and British armies had the disadvantage that the journalists ended up having the same experiences as the soldiers and thinking many of the same thoughts. It’s difficult not to bond with people who are important to one’s safety and with whom one shares common dangers. Armies like the embedding system in part because they can favour sympathetic reporters and exclude the more critical. For journalists, counterintuitively, it often means missing crucial parts of a war, since an experienced guerrilla commander will naturally attack wherever the enemy forces are absent or weak. Anybody embedded with the army will tend to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. In 2004 when the US Marines stormed the city of Fallujah, killing many insurgents, they were accompanied by most of Baghdad’s press corps. It was a famous and well-publicised victory, but largely ignored by the media at the time was the insurgent counter-stroke: the capture of the much larger city of Mosul in northern Iraq, from which US soldiers had withdrawn.
from a not-to-be-missed piece by Patrick Cockburn, the veteran war reporter for The Independent.  For the whole article, see Patrick Cockburn · Diary: Four Wars · London Review of Books, 10 October 2013
 “The Oriental doesn’t put the same high price on life as does the Westerner,” [U.S. commander, General William] Westmoreland famously said. “Life is plentiful, life is cheap in the Orient.”Having spoken to survivors of massacres by United States forces at Phi Phu, Trieu Ai, My Luoc and so many other hamlets, I can say with certainty that Westmoreland’s assessment was false.Decades after the conflict ended, villagers still mourn loved ones — spouses, parents, children — slain in horrific spasms of violence. They told me, too, about what it was like to live for years under American bombs, artillery shells and helicopter gunships; about what it was like to negotiate every aspect of their lives around the “American war,” as they call it; how the war transformed the most mundane tasks — getting water from a well or relieving oneself or working in the fields or gathering vegetables for a hungry family — into life-or-death decisions; about what it was like to live under United States policies that couldn’t have been more callous or contemptuous toward human life. 
Nick Turse, “For America, Life Was Cheap in Vietnam” - NYTimes.com

 “The Oriental doesn’t put the same high price on life as does the Westerner,” [U.S. commander, General William] Westmoreland famously said. “Life is plentiful, life is cheap in the Orient.”

Having spoken to survivors of massacres by United States forces at Phi Phu, Trieu Ai, My Luoc and so many other hamlets, I can say with certainty that Westmoreland’s assessment was false.

Decades after the conflict ended, villagers still mourn loved ones — spouses, parents, children — slain in horrific spasms of violence. They told me, too, about what it was like to live for years under American bombs, artillery shells and helicopter gunships; about what it was like to negotiate every aspect of their lives around the “American war,” as they call it; how the war transformed the most mundane tasks — getting water from a well or relieving oneself or working in the fields or gathering vegetables for a hungry family — into life-or-death decisions; about what it was like to live under United States policies that couldn’t have been more callous or contemptuous toward human life.

Nick Turse, “For America, Life Was Cheap in Vietnam” - NYTimes.com

Brig. Gen. Bryan T. Roberts publicly warned his troops at Fort Jackson, S.C., last spring that he and the Army had “zero tolerance for sexual harassment and sexual assault.” Here’s what the Army didn’t tell the soldiers: At the time, Roberts himself was under investigation by the military over allegations that he physically assaulted one of his mistresses on multiple occasions.
the always sharp and ever dogged Craig Whitlock from his latest deep dive into military misconduct “Military brass, behaving badly: Files detail a spate of misconduct dogging armed forces” - The Washington Post

For those in the Bay Area, I’ve got two appearances coming up.

On Monday, January 27 at 7:00 pm, I’ll be speaking about Kill Anything That Moves with Oscar Villalon, editor of ZZYZVA at the iconic City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco.

The next night, January 28 at 7:30 pm, I’ll be having a conversation with Vietnam veteran and former POW Phillip Butler at the First Congregational Church in Berkeley.

Hope to see you at either or both. For more details:

http://www.citylights.com/info/?fa=event&event_id=1985

and

http://www.kpfa.org/upcoming-kpfa-sponsored-events

On MSNBC’s “The Cycle” to talk about the Obama administration’s secret war in 134 countries around the world.

Without a clear picture of where the U.S. military’s covert forces are operating and what they are doing, Americans may not even recognize the consequences of our expanding secret wars as they wash over the world.  But if history is any guide, they will be felt — from Southwest Asia to the Mahgreb, the Middle East to Central Africa, and, perhaps eventually, in the United States as well.

For the full story, see “The Special Ops Surge: America’s Secret War in 134 Countries

Where are U.S. Special Operations forces and what are they doing?
In my latest article, I reveal — for the first time anywhere — the full extent of black ops deployments during 2013 and analyze the potential pitfalls of conducting a globalized secret war.  Without a clear picture of where the U.S. military’s covert forces are operating and what they are doing, Americans may not even recognize the consequences of and blowback from our expanding secret wars as they wash over the world.  But if history is any guide, they will be felt — from Southwest Asia to the Mahgreb, the Middle East to Central Africa, and, perhaps eventually, in the United States as well.
For the full story, see “The Special Ops Surge: America’s Secret War in 134 Countries” 

Where are U.S. Special Operations forces and what are they doing?

In my latest article, I reveal — for the first time anywhere — the full extent of black ops deployments during 2013 and analyze the potential pitfalls of conducting a globalized secret war.  Without a clear picture of where the U.S. military’s covert forces are operating and what they are doing, Americans may not even recognize the consequences of and blowback from our expanding secret wars as they wash over the world.  But if history is any guide, they will be felt — from Southwest Asia to the Mahgreb, the Middle East to Central Africa, and, perhaps eventually, in the United States as well.

For the full story, see “The Special Ops Surge: America’s Secret War in 134 Countries” 

Where are U.S. Special Operations forces and what are they doing?
In my latest article, I reveal — for the first time anywhere — the full extent of black ops deployments during 2013 and analyze the potential pitfalls of conducting a globalized secret war.  Without a clear picture of where the U.S. military’s covert forces are operating and what they are doing, Americans may not even recognize the consequences of and blowback from our expanding secret wars as they wash over the world.  But if history is any guide, they will be felt — from Southwest Asia to the Mahgreb, the Middle East to Central Africa, and, perhaps eventually, in the United States as well.
For the full story, see “The Special Ops Surge: America’s Secret War in 134 Countries” 

Where are U.S. Special Operations forces and what are they doing?

In my latest article, I reveal — for the first time anywhere — the full extent of black ops deployments during 2013 and analyze the potential pitfalls of conducting a globalized secret war.  Without a clear picture of where the U.S. military’s covert forces are operating and what they are doing, Americans may not even recognize the consequences of and blowback from our expanding secret wars as they wash over the world.  But if history is any guide, they will be felt — from Southwest Asia to the Mahgreb, the Middle East to Central Africa, and, perhaps eventually, in the United States as well.

For the full story, see “The Special Ops Surge: America’s Secret War in 134 Countries” 

Yes, Marcus. Your friends died in vain.
Jim Gourley from “The Best Defense” at Foreign Policy responding to former Navy SEAL and Lone Survivor author Marcus Luttrell who asked “We spend our whole lives training to defend this country, and then we were sent over there by this country, and you’re telling me because we were over there doing what we were told by our country that it was senseless and my guys died for nothing?”