Nick Turse
tamturse:

#Hoboken waterfront #NYC #EmpireState

tamturse:

#Hoboken waterfront #NYC #EmpireState

Several Southern African countries are dealing with the effects of flooding following heavy rains over much of the region in the past week.
(via IRIN Africa | Widespread flooding hits Southern Africa 

Several Southern African countries are dealing with the effects of flooding following heavy rains over much of the region in the past week.

(via IRIN Africa | Widespread flooding hits Southern Africa 

Somebody living in a slum and very poor like I am must make a choice. I can’t use 10 Kenya shillings (US$0.12) to pay for a toilet every day when that can buy me a jerrycan of water for bathing and washing my clothes

Walter Opicha, a resident of Manyatta, a sprawling slum in the western Kenya city of Kisumu, tells the United Nations’ news agency IRIN about the hard choices slum dwellers make everyday. 

Read more at: IRIN Africa | KENYA: Human waste woes in slums

pulitzercenter:

How long will it take for 75% of Nigeria to have access to safe drinking water?
The minister of water resources in Nigeria says it will happen by 2015.
But estimates from WHO/UNICEF differ – by 25 years.

pulitzercenter:

How long will it take for 75% of Nigeria to have access to safe drinking water?

The minister of water resources in Nigeria says it will happen by 2015.

But estimates from WHO/UNICEF differ – by 25 years.

kqedscience:

The same view of Mount Everest, 88 years apart, affords a striking contrast - and a much diminished glacier.
David Breashears says: “Eighty-six years after Mallory took that photograph, I sat in the exact spot where he had snapped his iconic picture. Pulling out his photo, I was stunned by the changes that had swept over this region. The wide river of ice had retreated more than half a mile, leaving a field of separated ice pinnacles melting into the rocky ground. In the distance, the ice streams on Everest’s flank also had shrunk, exposing more of the mountain’s dark face.”

kqedscience:

The same view of Mount Everest, 88 years apart, affords a striking contrast - and a much diminished glacier.

David Breashears says: “Eighty-six years after Mallory took that photograph, I sat in the exact spot where he had snapped his iconic picture. Pulling out his photo, I was stunned by the changes that had swept over this region. The wide river of ice had retreated more than half a mile, leaving a field of separated ice pinnacles melting into the rocky ground. In the distance, the ice streams on Everest’s flank also had shrunk, exposing more of the mountain’s dark face.”

climateadaptation:

Dammit. How did I miss this? I’m on every climate list and journalist group known to humankind. Note, even Hawaii is on this map. More soon.
mohandasgandhi:

U.S. Declares the Largest Natural Disaster Area Ever Due to Drought
The blistering summer and ongoing drought conditions have the prompted the U.S. Agriculture Department to declare a federal disaster area in more than 1,000 counties covering 26 states. That’s almost one-third of all the counties in the United States, making it the largest distaster declaration ever made by the USDA. 
The declaration covers almost every state in the southern halfof the continental U.S., from South Carolina in the East to California in the West. It’s also includes Colorado and Wyoming (which have been hit by devatasting wildfires) and Illinois, Indiana, Kansas and Nebraska in the Midwest. However, it does not include Iowa, which is the largest grain and corn producer in the U.S.
The USDA’s latest crop report is projecting a 12 percent decrease in the corn harvest this year, which would still be the third-largest haul on record. Despite the negative outlook, grain prices remains quite low, according to CNBC.
The ruling allows farmers in those affected counties to apply for low-interest loans and face reduced penalties for grazing on protected lands. The USDA says the loans will only amount to around $4 million, but is one of the few “limited tools” the department has available to help farmers. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has asked for a complete re-authorization of all existing agriculture programs, including crop insurance, that can be used to support struggling farms.
About 53 percent of the country is facing “moderate to extreme drought” so far this summer.

climateadaptation:

Dammit. How did I miss this? I’m on every climate list and journalist group known to humankind. Note, even Hawaii is on this map. More soon.

mohandasgandhi:

U.S. Declares the Largest Natural Disaster Area Ever Due to Drought

The blistering summer and ongoing drought conditions have the prompted the U.S. Agriculture Department to declare a federal disaster area in more than 1,000 counties covering 26 states. That’s almost one-third of all the counties in the United States, making it the largest distaster declaration ever made by the USDA. 

The declaration covers almost every state in the southern halfof the continental U.S., from South Carolina in the East to California in the West. It’s also includes Colorado and Wyoming (which have been hit by devatasting wildfires) and Illinois, Indiana, Kansas and Nebraska in the Midwest. However, it does not include Iowa, which is the largest grain and corn producer in the U.S.

The USDA’s latest crop report is projecting a 12 percent decrease in the corn harvest this year, which would still be the third-largest haul on record. Despite the negative outlook, grain prices remains quite low, according to CNBC.

The ruling allows farmers in those affected counties to apply for low-interest loans and face reduced penalties for grazing on protected lands. The USDA says the loans will only amount to around $4 million, but is one of the few “limited tools” the department has available to help farmers. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has asked for a complete re-authorization of all existing agriculture programs, including crop insurance, that can be used to support struggling farms.

About 53 percent of the country is facing “moderate to extreme drought” so far this summer.

From TomDispatch: A powerful, piece of reporting from the front-lines of the anti-fracking movement — Ellen Cantarow, “Shale-Shocked, Fracking Gets Its Own Occupy Movement.”  
In this trailblazing effort, Cantarow interviews participants in the movement, follows developments as local bans on fracking cascade across the state and anti-fracking citizens are voted into office, and vividly describes a movement with minimal funds facing off against some of the wealthiest corporations on the planet — with amazing success.
As she writes, “Consider this, then, an environmental Occupy Wall Street. It knows no divisions of social class or political affiliation. Everyone, after all, needs clean water.”    
Read the entire article here!
photo credit: Owen Crowley/Flickr

From TomDispatch: A powerful, piece of reporting from the front-lines of the anti-fracking movement — Ellen Cantarow, “Shale-Shocked, Fracking Gets Its Own Occupy Movement.” 

In this trailblazing effort, Cantarow interviews participants in the movement, follows developments as local bans on fracking cascade across the state and anti-fracking citizens are voted into office, and vividly describes a movement with minimal funds facing off against some of the wealthiest corporations on the planet — with amazing success.

As she writes, “Consider this, then, an environmental Occupy Wall Street. It knows no divisions of social class or political affiliation. Everyone, after all, needs clean water.”   

Read the entire article here!

photo credit: Owen Crowley/Flickr

From TomDispatch tonight: A powerful, piece of reporting from the front-lines of the anti-fracking movement — Ellen Cantarow, “Shale-Shocked, Fracking Gets Its Own Occupy Movement.” 
In this trailblazing effort, Cantarow interviews participants in the movement, follows developments as local bans on fracking cascade across the state and anti-fracking citizens are voted into office, and vividly describes a movement with minimal funds facing off against some of the wealthiest corporations on the planet — with amazing success.
As she writes, “Consider this, then, an environmental Occupy Wall Street. It knows no divisions of social class or political affiliation. Everyone, after all, needs clean water.”     
Read the entire article here!
photo credit: Owen Crowley/Flickr

From TomDispatch tonight: A powerful, piece of reporting from the front-lines of the anti-fracking movement — Ellen Cantarow, “Shale-Shocked, Fracking Gets Its Own Occupy Movement.” 

In this trailblazing effort, Cantarow interviews participants in the movement, follows developments as local bans on fracking cascade across the state and anti-fracking citizens are voted into office, and vividly describes a movement with minimal funds facing off against some of the wealthiest corporations on the planet — with amazing success.

As she writes, “Consider this, then, an environmental Occupy Wall Street. It knows no divisions of social class or political affiliation. Everyone, after all, needs clean water.”    

Read the entire article here!

photo credit: Owen Crowley/Flickr

The United Nations’ IRIN news agency reports:

"According to the most recent World Report on Child Injury Prevention, by WHO and the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), drowning is the leading cause of injury and death among under-fives in both the United States and Asia, but the rate of death by drowning is some 30 times higher in Asia.

Research by the Alliance for Safe Children, a Thailand-based organization that works to reduce the number of preventable child deaths in Asia, shows 95 percent of all childhood drowning deaths occur in Asia, where two-thirds of the world’s children live.”

IRIN Global | GLOBAL: National drought policies wanted 
The United Nations’ IRIN news agency reports that few countries have sufficient policies in place to manage the impact of  droughts, according to the Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction 2011.

IRIN Global | GLOBAL: National drought policies wanted

The United Nations’ IRIN news agency reports that few countries have sufficient policies in place to manage the impact of droughts, according to the Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction 2011.