Nick Turse

Thousands of women are being illegally held in Iraqi prisons, where they suffer torture and other forms of abuse, including sexual assault, Human Rights Watch said Thursday. HRW said that women in Iraqi prisons — the vast majority of whom are Sunni — have reported being beaten, kicked, and slapped, given electric shocks, and raped, while others have been threatened with sexual assault, sometimes in front of male relatives.

When he raped me, I wasn’t in a position where I could have cried for help. He would have killed me. Later, if I would have reported him, they [Khmer Rouge cadres] would have killed him, but they would have also killed me
Rys Yamlas, a villager who was raped 35 years ago by a Khmer Rouge soldier and recently came forward to give public testimony about the attack.  For the full story, courtesy of IRIN, see “Khmer Rouge sexual violence survivors break silence
It still hurts, but letting the world know about my story makes me feel better.
Rys Yamlas, a villager who was raped 35 years ago by a Khmer Rouge soldier and recently came forward to give public testimony about the attack.  For the full story, courtesy of IRIN, see “Khmer Rouge sexual violence survivors break silence
A court in South Africa sentenced a man to serve two life sentences for the rape and murder of 17-year-old Anene Booysen. Her injuries were so horrific that the doctors who treated her required counseling.

A court in South Africa sentenced a man to serve two life sentences for the rape and murder of 17-year-old Anene Booysen. Her injuries were so horrific that the doctors who treated her required counseling.

I have a daughter. Both my husband and I proudly served in the Army, and we have told our daughter of our experiences. I want my daughter (and all children) to consider serving in the military. But how can I ask her to enter the military knowing that her chances of being sexually assaulted are one in three, compared to one in six in the civilian world? Women in the military are more likely to be assaulted by another servicemember than killed in combat.
Donna McAleer, a West Point graduate, army veteran, award-winning author, speaker, and member of the Defense Advisory Council on Women in the Military at The Best Defense | FOREIGN POLICY
The New Delhi rape and murder of Jyoti Singh Pandey, the 23-year-old who was studying physiotherapy so that she could better herself while helping others, and the assault on her male companion (who survived) seem to have triggered the reaction that we have needed for 100, or 1,000, or 5,000 years. May she be to women — and men — worldwide what Emmett Till, murdered by white supremacists in 1955, was to African-Americans and the then-nascent U.S. civil rights movement.

globalpost:

Reports of a man beheading his sister in an apparent honor killing in India have garnered attention recently.

On Dec. 7, 29-year-old Mehtab Alam dragged his sister out onto the street, cut off her head in one stroke and walked to a police station with her head in his hand. The Times of India said it was the first honor killing to happen in Kolkata in decades.

Read more: Man beheads sister in broad daylight in India

The horrific news came as Indians protested in favor of stronger safety measures for women, after the 23-year-old victim of a brutal gang rape died last week.

India wasn’t the only country in the news for women’s issues.

In the United States, for the first time in 18 years, Congress did not reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.

House leadership chose to let the bill expire, balking at new provisions that would extend protections to undocumented immigrants, Native Americans and LGBT individuals.

In Indonesia, the city of Lhokseumawe ruled that female passengers are only allowed to ride side-saddle.

But after all that bad news, here’s a look at what women did achieve in 2012:

A year in women: notable female achievements of 2012, from Malala to Hillary

Rape and other acts of violence, up to and including murder, as well as threats of violence, constitute the barrage some men lay down as they attempt to control some women, and fear of that violence limits most women in ways they’ve gotten so used to they hardly notice — and we hardly address.
Threats of sexual assault now seem to take place online regularly. In late 2011, British columnist Laurie Penny wrote, “An opinion, it seems, is the short skirt of the Internet. Having one and flaunting it is somehow asking an amorphous mass of almost-entirely male keyboard-bashers to tell you how they’d like to rape, kill, and urinate on you. This week, after a particularly ugly slew of threats, I decided to make just a few of those messages public on Twitter, and the response I received was overwhelming. Many could not believe the hate I received, and many more began to share their own stories of harassment, intimidation, and abuse.”
Shilpa Jamkhandikar at Reuters writes:
"If you thought the Delhi gang rape would cause a serious debate on women’s rights in India, you’d be half right. Let’s look at the other half: last December’s brutal incident seems to have put a spell on India’s politicians, holy men and otherwise educated people.
From suggesting that the rape victim should have called her rapists ‘brother’ to blaming her stars, plenty of reasons cited for the crime lay the blame on the women whom men brutalize, or portray women in ways that reveal our skewed attitude toward women and their place in our society. When given an opportunity to figure out ways to improve the  education and behavior of men, and thus try to reduce the  number of rapes that occur in India, many people revert to the  more traditional method: limit the rights of women.”
(Read the full article at: Reuters — Shilpa Jamkhandikar, “Short skirts, bad stars and chow mein: why India’s women get raped” | India Insight)

Shilpa Jamkhandikar at Reuters writes:

"If you thought the Delhi gang rape would cause a serious debate on women’s rights in India, you’d be half right. Let’s look at the other half: last December’s brutal incident seems to have put a spell on India’s politicians, holy men and otherwise educated people.

From suggesting that the rape victim should have called her rapists ‘brother’ to blaming her stars, plenty of reasons cited for the crime lay the blame on the women whom men brutalize, or portray women in ways that reveal our skewed attitude toward women and their place in our society. When given an opportunity to figure out ways to improve the  education and behavior of men, and thus try to reduce the  number of rapes that occur in India, many people revert to the  more traditional method: limit the rights of women.”

(Read the full article at: Reuters — Shilpa Jamkhandikar, “Short skirts, bad stars and chow mein: why India’s women get raped” | India Insight)