Nick Turse
As Nick Turse has made clear, the Vietnam War was much worse than expected – partly because of the astonishing resolve of America’s enemies, but mainly because of the ignorance and the brute ruthlessness that beat in the heart of America’s war machine. Kill Anything That Moves should be required reading in every school, military academy and governmental office in the land. Not that it will stop us from blundering into the next war.

Bill Morris, “Why Are We Still Reading About Vietnam? Kill Anything That Moves by Nick Turse.” (via millionsmillions)

This is the review you dare not dream about because you imagine it could never happen.  To be mentioned with the likes of Neil Sheehan, David Halberstam, Seymour Hersh, Jonathan Schell, Frances FitzGeraldMichael Herr, Philip Caputo, Bobbie Ann Mason, Robert Stone, Jayne Anne Phillips, Tim O’Brien, Ward Just, and, Graham Greene!?!  I’m speechless.

Who knows the hidden history of the Vietnam War better than Daniel Ellsberg?  Not only did he observe the conflict firsthand from the field, but he read the the military’s secret documents and then allowed us all to do the same by releasing the “Pentagon Papers.”  As such, I was a little shocked by the mind-blowing blurb Ellsberg offered for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.  I’m a little overwhelmed.
“No book I have read in decades has so shaken me, as an American. Turse lays open the ground-level reality of a war that was far more atrocious than Americans at home have ever been allowed to know. He exposes official policies that encouraged ordinary American soldiers and airmen to inflict almost unimaginable horror and suffering on ordinary Vietnamese, followed by official cover-ups as tenacious as Turse’s own decade of investigative effort against them. Kill Anything That Moves is obligatory reading for Americans, because its implications for the likely scale of atrocities and civilian casualties inflicted and covered up in our latest wars are inescapable and staggering.” —Daniel Ellsberg, author of Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers

Who knows the hidden history of the Vietnam War better than Daniel Ellsberg?  Not only did he observe the conflict firsthand from the field, but he read the the military’s secret documents and then allowed us all to do the same by releasing the “Pentagon Papers.”  As such, I was a little shocked by the mind-blowing blurb Ellsberg offered for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.  I’m a little overwhelmed.

“No book I have read in decades has so shaken me, as an American. Turse lays open the ground-level reality of a war that was far more atrocious than Americans at home have ever been allowed to know. He exposes official policies that encouraged ordinary American soldiers and airmen to inflict almost unimaginable horror and suffering on ordinary Vietnamese, followed by official cover-ups as tenacious as Turse’s own decade of investigative effort against them. Kill Anything That Moves is obligatory reading for Americans, because its implications for the likely scale of atrocities and civilian casualties inflicted and covered up in our latest wars are inescapable and staggering.” —Daniel Ellsberg, author of Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers

Published in 1972, Frances FitzGerald’s Fire in the Lake won a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award, and the Bancroft Prize.  Since then, its been indispensable reading for those seeking to understand the Vietnam War.  As such, I can’t help but share FitzGerald’s blurb for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.  I’m thoroughly humbled.

“Meticulously researched, Kill Anything That Moves is the most comprehensive account to date of the war crimes committed by U.S. forces in Vietnam and the efforts made at the highest levels of the military to cover them up. It’s an important piece of history.” — Frances FitzGerald, author of Fire in the Lake: The Vietnamese and the Americans in Vietnam

Published in 1972, Frances FitzGerald’s Fire in the Lake won a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award, and the Bancroft Prize.  Since then, its been indispensable reading for those seeking to understand the Vietnam War.  As such, I can’t help but share FitzGerald’s blurb for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.  I’m thoroughly humbled. 

“Meticulously researched, Kill Anything That Moves is the most comprehensive account to date of the war crimes committed by U.S. forces in Vietnam and the efforts made at the highest levels of the military to cover them up. It’s an important piece of history.” — Frances FitzGerald, author of Fire in the Lake: The Vietnamese and the Americans in Vietnam

Another blurb for my for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam is in and I couldn’t be more pleased by what James Bradley, the man who brought us Flags of Our Fathers, has to say.  I’m truly flattered.  

“American patriots will appreciate Nick Turse’s meticulously documented book, which for the first time reveals the real war in Vietnam and explains why it has taken so long to learn the whole truth.” —James Bradley, coauthor of Flags of Our Fathers

nickturse:

Blurbs are coming in for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam and I can’t help but share this one from Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried, Going After Cacciato, and If I Die in a Combat Zone, among others.  I’m left speechless. 

“This book is an overdue and powerfully detailed account of widespread war crimes — homicide and torture and mutilation and rape — committed by American soldiers over the course of our military engagement in Vietnam. Nick Turse’s research and reportage is based in part on the U.S. military’s own records, reports, and transcripts, many of them long hidden from public scrutiny. Kill Anything That Moves is not only a compendium of pervasive and illegal and sickening savagery toward Vietnamese civilians, but it is also a record of repetitive deceit and cover-ups on the part of high ranking officers and officials. In the end, I hope, Turse’s book will become a hard-to-avoid, hard-to-dismiss corrective to the very common belief that war crimes and tolerance for war crimes were mere anomalies during our country’s military involvement in Vietnam.” —Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried

Another blurb for my for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam is in and I couldn’t be more pleased by what James Bradley, the man who brought us Flags of Our Fathers, has to say.  I’m truly flattered.  

“American patriots will appreciate Nick Turse’s meticulously documented book, which for the first time reveals the real war in Vietnam and explains why it has taken so long to learn the whole truth.” —James Bradley, coauthor of Flags of Our Fathers

Blurbs are coming in for my next book, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam and I can’t help but share this one from Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried, Going After Cacciato, and If I Die in a Combat Zone, among others.  I’m left speechless. 

"This book is an overdue and powerfully detailed account of widespread war crimes — homicide and torture and mutilation and rape — committed by American soldiers over the course of our military engagement in Vietnam. Nick Turse’s research and reportage is based in part on the U.S. military’s own records, reports, and transcripts, many of them long hidden from public scrutiny. Kill Anything That Moves is not only a compendium of pervasive and illegal and sickening savagery toward Vietnamese civilians, but it is also a record of repetitive deceit and cover-ups on the part of high ranking officers and officials. In the end, I hope, Turse’s book will become a hard-to-avoid, hard-to-dismiss corrective to the very common belief that war crimes and tolerance for war crimes were mere anomalies during our country’s military involvement in Vietnam.” —Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried